Jack Canfield – Tell The Truth Faster

“When in doubt, tell the truth.” – Mark Twain

Aren’t we afraid of the consequences of making others feel uncomfortable or unworthy?

I use to work in Australia at a dental office where an assistant would complain all-day, turn customers away, have rude antics throughout the office, and was too stubborn to learn some of the most basic principles and procedures – yet they still kept her on staff.  Why?  They were afraid of firing her because they didn’t want to make her feel bad.

Telling the truth sooner is one of the most important success habits in the best world that you will ever develop.  In fact, as soon as you start asking yourself that question, “when would be the best time to tell the truth,” that’s actually the best time to do so.

Will it be uncomfortable? Probably.  Will it create lots of negative reactions from other peers and colleagues? Absolutely, but it’s the right thing to do.  Get into the habit of telling the truth faster, especially if you’re a boss because if you don’t, having employees in your business who are considered “cancer” will end up dissecting everything about your business.

I’ve seen it happen at a number a businesses across dozens of countries and it all came because a particular person was “scared” to fire someone.

Formula For Crucial Conversations – Jack Canfield

  1. To begin, determine you motivation for having the conversation, whether it’s merely to express yourself and get something off your chest – or to eventually solve a problem.
  2. Make sure to schedule enough time to have the conversation.
  3. Plan your conversation in advance by crafting a clear message that keeps you on track.  Start with the facts of what actually happened or is happening versus the story you may have made up in your HEADDD!!! How will you report the facts of the situation? Be sure to separate the actual facts from the feeling you’ve attached to the situation or the event.
  4. After reporting the facts, ask the other person, “How do you see this?” What do they think the impact is? Oftentimes we presuppose or imagine some horrible reaction or consequence without knowing what the other person’s actually experience of the situation is.
  5. Ask the other party what they would like to do to resolve the matter – if in fact you are looking for resolution.  Sometimes simply expressing yourself might be your goal.
  6. If you decide to resolve the issue, agree on and document what actions you will both take, by when you will take them, and how you will follow up with each other.

Podcast – https://www.spreaker.com/episode/9341945

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