TOEFL: Part A – Part I – Incomplete Independent Clauses

For all of my students around the world tuning in to my  YouTube channel and blogs for test preparation help, here’s one on TOEFL.

I know a lot of people view my blogs for a number of things; whether it’s health related articles or personal development.  However, this particular blog is for several PhD students who have asked me to break down the TOEFL (which is widely known test for NES students who are trying to learn abroad) grammar section into small steps.

Because grammar in TOEFL is the same as ACT and SAT (or very near), I’m going to break down each category individually to help you understand the very basics in understanding Structure.

Introduction

This part of the test consists of fifteen incomplete sentences.  Some portion of each sentence has been replaced by a blank, so it’s up to you to figure out which one completes the sentence grammatically and logically.

On top of this, there are five main points tested.

Sentence Structure

  • Incomplete Independent Clauses
  • Independent Adjective clauses
  • Missing Participial Phrases
  • Missing Appositives
  • Adverb Clauses
  • Noun Clauses
  • Missing Prepositional Phrases

The other testing points consist of: word order, verbs & verbals, proper style, and word choice.

In the PDF down below I go over the basic simple, compound and complex sentence structuring along with independent clauses and a couple of examples.  I don’t want too much information overload on the first TOEFL blog, so stay updated for more coming this week. Consider this a warm-up.

TOEFL Part A – Incomplete Independent Clauses

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