Napoleon Hill’s Failure – Identifying Your Turning Points — Part 1 of 2

While I do not mean to convey the impression that I believe all of our acts to be controlled by causes beyond our power to direct, yet I strongly urge you to study and correctly interpret those causes which mark the most vital turning-points of your life; the points at which your efforts are diverted – from the old into new channels – in spite of all that you can do.  At least refrain from accepting any defeat as failure until you shall have had time to analyze the final result. – Napoleon Hill

This is one of the funnest things to do in analyzing where you were and where you want to go.  Remember Steve Jobs said, “you can never connect the dots looking forward, only backwards.”  This is imperative and here’s what I came about with my turning points…I’m going to separate this into two podcasts and two blogs so not saturate everyone with so much information.

First Turning-Point: Bad Money In Chanthaburi.

My first job I got only 600$ USD a month, which is about 18,000 baht.  This salary, for any native English speaker, is downright criminal.  I wasn’t at the top of my game, but I was fresh in the world of teaching.  After being ridiculously threatened, berated, constantly scrutinized and talk badly to, receiving despicable looks from the parents because I was color, piss-poor working conditions and a bunch of empty promises – I had to make a massive financial decision.  My savings was plummeting and I was going to go 60 days without pay from October-November.  What did I do? I had to do what was in the best interest of me versus what other people wanted.

Second Turning Point: 10$ To My Name – Made An Oath

After trekking down to the south of Thailand to continue my teaching, I was hit with a financial disaster.  Having agreed to a 1000$ USD amount per month (which puts me in the top 50% of Native-English teachers in Thailand) I didn’t get paid for the month of October.  In saying that, November was going to be a very difficult; if not, the most difficult financial month of my life.  After borrowing money from my department head to last me for the month, I made an oath to myself: “I will never be this broke again.”  Having only 10$ to my name was one of the scariest moments of my entire teaching career here in Thailand.  10$! I had to do two-week visa runs because I didn’t have a visa or work permit; no family willing to transfer me money; no friends around to help me out; NOTHING! After finally getting a lump sum of money, I rejoiced and I never looked back.

Third & Fourth Turning Points Are In The Podcast Down Below.

Ask yourself the question, “have I overcome financial hardships? And when I did, did I improve on my life?”

 

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