Lewis Howes: Material Mask – Part II: Does Money Kill?

After accumulating so many riches over the course of years, Lewis Howes is still one of those people who drive a 1991 Cadillac. He went on to say that Tai Lopez’ viewpoint on buying luxury cars was interesting to him.  Heck, I believe anyone who buys cars over 100k$ USD is doing it to cover up what they’re lacking, if I haven’t said that already.

“Tai described the dangers of money quite well. He said, “I think that if you’re not careful, money is like a pit bull. A pit bull can save your life or it can turn around and kill you.”

If I can recall a story which Tony Robbins spoke about in his book about the richest man in Germany, Adolf Merkel.  This man was a billionaire back in his day, and after suffering a huge gamble and losing about 25% of his networth, he was absolutely finished with life.  His identity was so attached to money to the point he felt powerless, and in the ensuing days he threw himself off the building, ultimately committing suicide.

Anyone who believes money can kill them is right – based on face-value.  However, if you’re one of those people who look at money from an “enabling” standpoint, you’ll never think money “has you.”  Look at me.  Sure, I’ll be moving across town to a gorgeous condo and kick off 2018 with the most successfully sound bank account I’ve ever possessed.  But does that define who I am? Hell no.  Quite frankly, I can really give a damn about how much I make all year next year.  What I wanted most from one particular place was respect; then I was delivered racism and threats…so I got up and left because I knew there were six projects aching for my services.  Am I doing to purely because the money? ABSOLUTELY NOT! It’s the handshake after another.  Having speaking engagements in possibly Morocco and even in Bangkok (Tedx) is what I do it for.  Will I buy an Audi to look cool and contribute to the traffic congested roads in Thailand? Ludicrous!

“I suppose that’s why a lot of guys either love or hate Tai Lopez. Some see him as a hero. They want to drive nice cars. They want to be surrounded by models in their enormous mansions. They want to be able to hang out with celebrities who come over to their house. They want to be—or appear to be—the opposite of the invisible, ashamed, anonymous person they might feel themselves to be. Other guys see him as a fraud or a liar. They are convinced he’s making it all up and that he doesn’t actually have any money. They obsessively produce videos that question whether Tai rents his exotic cars or if his house is really his. If I had to guess why those doubters are so obsessed, it’s because, if Tai’s story is true, then deep down, they don’t think they would be able to do the same things Tai has done. And that kind of self-doubt, especially to a man raised in our current culture, is too crippling not to project outward onto others.”

Excerpt From: Lewis Howes. “The Mask of Masculinity.” iBooks.

There are a number of videos, Twitter accounts, and Facebook accounts depicting Tai Lopez.  Tom Bilyeu had him on Impact Theory recently, and the majority of his fans swarmed with positive comments.  On the other hand, those same people who feel that Tai is better than them began spewing rhetoric at everyone and everything about Tai.  Personally, I have no idea who Tai’s followers are, but regardless of what aisle people may be on, you do have to realize that Tai has that version of a material mask on.

I love how Lewis Howes put it.  He said, “listen to Tai is to watch his YouTube videos. And to listen to his insight is to watch him dispense it from the captain’s chair of a private jet surrounded by models in bandage dresses. Or from backstage at a concert. Or poolside at a private villa. Or in his giant Beverly Hills mansion. This extra bit of detail is like theater or a costume, and without it, it’s almost like he thinks his ideas will have less value. Or worse, they won’t matter.”

Like Lewis Howes said, all that materialism invalidates the quality of a person’s idea.



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