Napoleon Hill: Cooperation – The Necessary Instructions For Action

Gary Vee kind of s***s on the secret, saying that “if you think you’re just going to visualize sitting in a yacht, thing again!”  He was talking on The Breakfast Club, a controversial show, and shortly after one of the speakers said, “hey, I actually believe that – but you have to follow it with action.”

See you have physical action and mental action.  You can be very active with your mind while your body is inactive.  If you believe that visualizing a billion dollars in your lap will make you obtain a billion dollars without inspired action or a burning desire, think again.

There are some men of action.  One his a dynamo and one is a balanced wheel.

The man who is a “balanced-wheel” who does nothing but compile facts, figures and statistics is just as much as a man of action as the man who goes upon the platform and sells an idea to a thousand people by the sheer power of his active personality.

A good reference is when a man, who has hated me, called for a meeting and almost my ahead.  He sat there showing statistics that were completely covering up the internal problem of the company.  He said, “your renewals are going down.”  I can sit here and justify why my renewals are going down, but the fact and matter is that one of the “top” academic teachers in the company had a 30% lower mark in renewals than me – yet I was being scrutinized heavily for students “not renewing.”

“The world pays you for what you do and not for what you know.”

This statement could be a bit misconstrued.  What the world really pays you for is what you do and what you can make others do.

A man who can make others co-operate and do effective team-work, or inspire others so that the become more active, is no less a man of action than the man who renders effective service in a more direct manner. – Napoleon Hill

The main purpose of this book and what I’m trying to convey is to help you analyze yourself and determine what your native ability.  Figuring out your definite chief-aim is the first part.

Let’s now talk about how action can be developed.

First: Form the habit of doing each day the most distasteful tasks first.  This procedure will be difficult at first, but after you have formed the habit you will take pride in pitching into the hardest and most undesirable part of your work first.

THE MUNDANE TASKS! Remember I’ve been saying this for almost two years.  Completing the most mundane tasks first and free-ing up those attention units are pivotal.  Some people like to brush it aside, but get it done, and out of the way first.

Example, if I have to write monotonously boring reports for students, bet your a$$ I’m going to do it almost immediately.  The philosophy in terms of putting something on paper for a student rather than explaining it to them face-to-face is quite unsettling.

If someone tells me to do something that I don’t want to do…but that I have to do, I’m going to hurry up and do it.

Another example is preparing for a big project.  If my colleagues say: “could you please send this, come in and talk to us about this…blah blah blah” – I’m going to do that immediately.

Second: Place this sign in front of you where you can see it in your daily work, and put a copy in your bedroom, where it will greet you as you retire and when you arise: “Do not tell them what you can do; show them!”

Third: Repeat the following words, aloud, twelve times each night just before you go to sleep: “Tomorrow I will do everything that should be done, when it should be done, and as it should be done.  I will perform the most difficult tasks first because this will destroy the habit of procrastination and develop the habit of action in its place.”

Fourth: Carry Out These Instructions with faith in their soundness and with belief that they will develop action, in body and in mind, sufficient to enable you to realize your definite chief-aim.

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