TOEIC Grammar: Determiners & Pronouns

Determiners and pronouns

Point 1 Determiners Definition :

A determiner is a word that is normally used at the beginning of a noun phrase. Determiners include:

  • articles. There are two types of articles: – the definite article: the
    – the indefinite article: a/an
  • possessive adjectives
  • demonstrative adjectives


Some and any are usually followed by plural countable nouns and uncountable nouns and are used as follows:

some cars

any cars

some money

any money

         Some is used:

  • in affirmative sentences: He’s got some books from the library.
  • in offers and requests:Could I have some books, please?
    Why don’t you take some books home with you?

    Any is used:

  • in negatives (not any = no; hardly any; never any): There isn’t any reason to complain.
  • in questions: Have they got any children?
  • in affirmative sentences, any = “no matter which”, “no matter who”,“no matter what”
    You can borrow any of my books.

    Their compounds

    Their compounds, which are always singular, are:

    • someone/somebody, something, somewhere. I have something to say.
    • anyone/anybody, anything, anywhere. Does anybody have the time?
      You may invite anybody to dinner, I don’t mind.  You can invite anyone to dinner.
    • no one/nobody, nothing, nowhere. Homeless people have nowhere to go at night.
    • (everyone/everybody, everything, everywhere).
    • They can be followed by else. There’s nothing else to do.
    • What else do you want to watch?

However, you can also use “someone’s car/somebody’s coming” in contraction form to show position or just using the LV “is.”


Also, “else” is one of those words that’s very difficult to understand, simply because there’s not much of a translation into the Thai language.  Example, “what else do you want to do?” My students look at me cluelessly because they just can’t wrap their heads around it.



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