Napoleon Hill: Full Book Review – Lessons 11-15

Lesson XI: Concentration

First: At the beginning of the formation of a new habit put force and enthusiasm into your expression.  Feel what you think.  Remember that you are taking the first steps toward making the new mental path; that it is much harder at first than it will be afterwards.  Make the path as clear and as deep as you can, at the beginning, so that you can readily see it the next time you wish to follow it.

Second: Keep your attention firmly concentrated on the new path-building, and keep your mind away from the old paths, lest you incline toward them.  Forget all about the old paths, and concern yourself only with the new ones that you are building to order.

Third: Travel over your newly made paths as often as possible.  Make opportunities for doing so, without waiting for them to arise through luck or chance.  The oftener you go over the new paths the sooner will they become well worn and easily traveled.  Create plans for passing over these new habit-paths, at the very start.

Fourth: Resist the temptation to travel over the older, easier paths that you have been using in the past.  Every time you resist a temptation, the strong do you become, and the easier will it be for you to do so the next time.  But every time you yield to the temptation, the easier does it become to yield again, and the more difficult it becomes to resist the next time.  You will have a fight on at the start, and this is the critical time.  Prove your determination, persistency and will-power now, at the very beginning.

Fifth: Be sure that you have mapped out the right path, as your definite chief aim, and then go ahead without fear and without allowing yourself to doubt.  “Place your hand upon the plow, and look not backward.”  Select your goal, then make good, deep, wide, mental paths leading straight to it.

Through habit, an act repeatedly performed in the same manner has a tendency to become permanent.

If your environment is not to your liking, change it!

Lesson XII: Co-operation

First: Form the habit of doing each day the most distasteful tasks first.  This procedure will be difficult at first, but after you have formed the habit you will take pride in pitching into the hardest and most undesirable part of your work first.

Second: Place this sign in front of you where you can see it in your daily work, and put a copy in your bedroom, where it will greet you as you retire and when you arise: “do not tell them what you can do; show them!”

Third: Repeat the following words, aloud, twelve times each night before you go to sleep: “Tomorrow I will do everything that should be done, when it should be done, and as it should be done.  I will perform the most difficult tasks first because this will destroy the habit of procrastination and develop the habit of action in its place.”

Fourth: Carry out these instructions with faith in their soundness and with belief that they will develop action, in body and in mind, sufficient to enable you to realize your definite chief-aim.

Lesson XIII: Failure

Neither temporary defeat nor adversity amounts to failure in the mind of the person who looks upon it as a teacher that will teach some needed lesson.  As a matter of fact, there is a great and lasting lesson in every reverse, and in every defeat; and, usually, it is a lesson that could be learned in no other way than through defeat.

Defeat often talks to us in a “dumb language” that we do not understand.  If this were not true, we would not make the same mistakes over and over again without profiting by the lessons that they might teach us.

https://www.spreaker.com/episode/13325394 – Turning point

Lesson XIV: Tolerance

First: Intolerance is a form of ignorance which must be mastered before any form of enduring success may be attained.  It is the chief cause of all wars.  It makes enemies in business and in the professions.  It disintegrates the organized forces of society in a thousand forms, and stand, like a mighty giant, as a barrier to the abolition of war.  It dethrones reason and substitutes mob psychology in its place.

Second: Intolerance is the chief disintegrating force in the organized religions of the world, where it plays havoc with the greatest power for good there is on this earth; by breaking up that power into small sects and denominations which spend as much effort opposing each other as they do in destroying the evils of the world.

Lesson XV: The Golden Rule

 

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