Stephen Covey’s Synergistic Communication: Foreword & Classroom Synergy

Phew, another golden chapter from one of the most golden-led books in the realm of personal development.

When you communicate synergistically, you are simply opening your mind and heart and expressions to new possibilities, new alternatives, new options.

You’re not sure when you engage in synergistic communication how things will work out or what the end will look like, but you do have an inward sense of excitement and security and adventure, believing that it will be significantly better than it was before.

Boom! Now, I’m going to relate to a particular group of people who are finding it extremely hard to open their mind and heart to new possibilities — Americans.

With what I talked about yesterday in terms of what’s happening around the world, America is in desperate need of help — period.  Roseanne Barr, who was a sitcom actress, spouted and spewed some hateful remarks towards an African American.  Americans on one side said, “ohhh, that’s not racist! That’s not this! That’s not that!” completely shoving aside the fact that if they had listened empathically, and I mean with empathy, they’ve could’ve opened up a new side of themselves.  A side that’s so desperately needed in America today with the racial issues that are making waves on the nasty, WMD platforms (weapons of mass distraction).

Many people have not really experienced even a moderate degree of synergy in their family life or in other interactions.  They’ve been trained and scripted into defensive and protective communications or into believing that life or other people can’t be trusted.

And as you can see, this is why so many barriers are created in the world.

This represents one of the great tragedies and wastes in life, because so much potential remains untapped — completely undeveloped and unused.  Ineffective people live day after day with unused potential.  They experience synergy only in small, peripheral ways in their lives.

They may have memories of some unusually creative experiences, perhaps in athletics, where they were involved in a real team spirit for a period of time.  or perhaps they were in an emergency situation where people cooperated to an unusually high degree and submerged ego and pride in an effort to save someone’s life or produce a solution to a crisis.

To many, such events may seem unusual, almost out of character with life, even miraculous.  But this is not so.  These things can be produced regularly, consistently, almost daily in people’s lives.

Classroom Synergy

I’ll never forget a university class I taught in leadership philosophy and style.  We were about three weeks into a semester when, in the middle of a presentation, one person started to relate some very powerful personal experiences which were both emotional and insightful.  A spirit of humility and reverence fell upon the class — reverence toward this individual and appreciate for his courage.

We abandoned the old syllabus, the purchased textbooks and all the presentation plans, and we set up new purposes and projects and assignments.  We became so excited about what was happening that in about three more weeks, we all sensed an overwhelming desire to share what was happening with others.

We decided to write a book containing our learnings and insights on the subject of our study — principles of leadership.  Assignments were changed, new projects undertaken, new teams formed.  People worked much harder than they ever would have in the original class structure.

Out of this experience emerged an extremely unique, cohesive, and synergistic culture that did not end with the semester.

I’ve had a many of experiences like this that I have spoken about in my podcast down below.

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