Rich Dad Poor Dad | S5 – E15 | Many Financial Problems are Caused by Keeping Up with The Joneses

No, this isn’t the Gary Vee rant. This is what Robert Kiyosaki wrote in his book decades ago.

That is why my educated dad said the Japanese valued the power of the mirror the most, for it is only when we look into it that we find truth. Fear is the main reason that people say, “Play it safe.” That goes for anything, be it sports, relationships, careers, or money. It is that same fear, the fear of ostracism, that causes people to conform to, and not question, commonly accepted opinions or popular trends: “Your home is an asset.” “Get a bill-consolidation loan, and get out of debt.” “Work harder.” “It’s a promotion.” “Someday I’ll be a vice president.” “Save money.” “When I get a raise, I’ll buy us a bigger house.” “Mutual funds are safe.”

Rich Dad Poor Dad

Rich Dad says “home is a liability.”

Poor Dad says “home is an asset.”

I remember when I drew the following diagram for my dad showing him the direction of cash flow. I also showed him the ancillary expenses that went along with owning the home. A bigger home meant bigger expenses, and the cash flow kept going out through the expense column.

Home as an asset can only be an asset if it’s real-estate. If it’s not real estate, you’re not getting rental income from it; therefore, you’re living in the house.

Also, with a mortgage comes monthly expenses such as property tax, maintenance and utilities.

Rich Dad Poor Dad

  • When it comes to houses, most people work all their lives paying for a home they never own. In other words, most people buy a new house every few years, each time incurring a new 30-year loan to pay off the previous one.
  • Even though people receive a tax deduction for interest on mortgage payments, they pay for all their other expenses with after-tax dollars, even after they pay off their mortgage.
  • My wife’s parents were shocked when the property taxes on their home increased to $1,000 a month. This was after they had retired, so the increase put a strain on their retirement budget, and they felt forced to move.
  • Houses do not always go up in value. I have friends who owe a million dollars for a home that today would sell for far less.
  • The greatest losses of all are those from missed opportunities. If all your money is tied up in your house, you may be forced to work harder because your money continues blowing
    out of the expense column, instead of adding to the asset column—the classic middle-class cash-flow pattern. If a young couple would put more money into their asset column early on, their later years would be easier. Their assets would have grown and would be available to help cover expenses. All too often, a house only serves as a vehicle for incurring a home-equity loan to pay for mounting expenses.

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