IELTS | Speaking | People & Relationships + Webinar Preview

Hello, all! I’m back with a wonderful webinar preview! So, in today’s session, we’re going to dive into adjectives and meanings, as well as relationship phrases and audios that support them. This is going to be an excellent lesson and the follow-up will be this upcoming weekend (Webinar!). So, let’s dive into some language development, introduce story-telling, grade three speaking part twos and go from there!

Language Development

Match the definitions with their adjectives

  1. ambitious
  2. nosy
  3. judgemental
  4. hard-working
  5. open-minded
  6. over-sensitive
  7. reliable
  8. self-assured
  9. stingy
  10. clever
  11. creative
  12. good fun
  13. outgoing
  • charismatic
  • benevolent
  • free-spirited
  • driven
  • energetic
  • intelligent and able to understand things easily or plan things well
  • willing to listen to and consider other people’s ideas and suggestions
  • putting a lot of effort into your work
  • saying exactly what you think without trying to be polite
  • an be trusted to work well or to behave in the way that someone wants you to
  • unwilling to spend money
  • too quick to criticize people
  • having confidence in your own abilities
  • with a strong desire to be successful, rich, or powerful
  • very friendly and likes meeting and talking to people
  • too easily offended
  • interested in things that do not concern you
  • with the ability to invent and develop original ideas, especially in the arts
  • easily irritated by things
  • enjoyable to be with because you say and do interesting or amusing things

Vocabulary: Relationship Phrases

  1. get on with somebody/get along with somebody
  2. look up to somebody
  3. be in touch with somebody
  4. fall out with somebody
  5. grow apart from somebody
  6. take after somebody
  7. grow up together/with somebody
  8. be close to somebody

a. argue and stop being friendly with somebody

b. have a good relationship

c. gradually have a less close relationship with somebody

d. be in communincation with

e. know somebody well and see or talk to them often

f. have many childhood and adolescent experiences in common with somebody

g. respect somebody

h. resemble somebody in your family (in appearance or personality)

Speaking Question 2 Evaluations

Number 1

Mom

got on and hardly ever fall out

really outgoing, always going out with friends and colleagues

good fun

look up to her because she’s so hard-working and never sits still

works long hours

could be a bit impatient

not efficient as her, take after her in that

over-sensitive, getting offended for no reason

Number 2

inseparable

so creative

new games they can play

make stories to make her laugh

amazed by open-mindedness

I wish…

unfortunately grew apart

by the time they went to uni, not in touch

sad, blame it on reliability

Example, won’t respond

Number 3

Cliche

don’t get on with inlaws

mother-in-law

nosy

always wanting to know everything

blunt

upsets her

stingy

Ex, go out for meal

never offers to pay

much better off than them

she’s clever

set up own business

gone from strength-strength

What to Expect on Webinar?

IELTS Speaking Part 2 – Webinar

  • Introduction
  • Connecting words
  • Practice Speaking (Impromptu Style)
  • Listening to your audio and critiquing it
  • Task Cards
  • Story-telling style

A Story of Empathy

I had followed up on a construction company job that I should’ve gotten after my teaching profile was sent there. I was waiting for a while and finally I messaged the lady who had interviewed me just weeks before. 

“Hey, just wanted to know about the construction company?”

…”oh, they chose another teacher.”

Hmmmm….ok. 

I get it. You sent multiple profiles, and considering it was just 2018, I didn’t have the monster resumé I do today. However, why didn’t they send just one and say “this is your trainer?”

So I took it with a grain of salt. (no big deal)

However, it happened again just a year later. 

It wasn’t just one company, either. It was four. 

“Arsenio, you free Tuesday? You free Wednesday? You free this time?”

Locations were given and I was excited, but then the whole “disappearing act” happened. 

I FINALLY asked, after the fourth company, “why do you just disappear?”

Response: “oh, the company chose another teacher.”

Considering that I’ve trained at the biggest company in all of Thailand, this didn’t make any sense. 

So, you put a brown face and four other white faces on a table at a company — IN THAILAND. What do you think is going to happen?

Lack of Empathy: “it’s business. We want them to have choices.”

Empathy: “oh, Arsenio…I get it. Maybe we should give them just one choice, you, and then they can see your four cores of credibility rather than just choosing a trainer based on color.”

Since then, I withdrew my name from the pot and they could absolutely never ask me again because I’m not someone’s experiment. I put myself first and they know I’m the #1, yet if you give Thai companies the ability to act based on skin color, they absolutely will. 

Empathy is absolutely essential in the workplace, and if you don’t lead by example, you ultimately lose trainers, and the best of them.

I’ll leave you with this: I showed up with a friend at the biggest bank in Thailand. We did a presentation, she presented me as the trainer, and the top of HR absolutely loved me. You see, she didn’t put four pieces of paper on a table, she knew that I was the number one, and since then I’ve done four workshops at that bank. 

Do you understand now?

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IELTS Speaking Webinar (June 26th at 6 pm GMT +7) | Part 2

Have you been having difficulties in improving your Speaking Part II? Not exactly sure how to answer the question? Are you lacking story-telling?

Well, it’s time to present you with this webinar!

Last year, lots of my Filipina students had always gotten the infamous 6.5 speaking band. They were never able to get a 7.0, which is required to get their license and head to America to practice nursing. After giving them structure, implementing story-telling, and practicing their reasoning….they were able to achieve these bands.

So, on June the 26th, I will host a Speaking Part II webinar at 6 pm Bangkok, Thailand time (GMT +7) and the first 3-5 attendees will have a coaching session with me!

You’ll be tested right off the back in the beginning, and then the coaching session will begin with a variety of ways of answering the question.

Sounds good, Arsenio…but how much?

$5!


That’s right. $5 gets you not only in but also access to the webinar for a lifetime.

Not able to make it? NO PROBLEM!

You can purchase the webinar later for the same price!

In saying that, message me and inquire today! Also, follow me on IG for more information!

Webinar: https://arsenioseslpodcast.podia.com/ielts-speaking-part-2-webinar

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/arsenioseslpodcast/

Arsenio’s Business English Podcast | Sales | Increasing Sales & Profiting from Greed

I had spoken to one of my students and she said, “today is probably the last week I’ll be learning with you.”

I said, “oh, hell no. What do I NOT know?”

Over the next 10 minutes, and to my amazement, I sold her a massive package to continued studying English without the middle-man.

The middle-man boosted packages for online learning — not once, not twice — but THREE TIMES! In the midst of an ongoing pandemic, he literally shot at his own foot and I profited from it.

In today’s podcast, it’s not only about going for the low-hanging fruit, but also giving learning alternatives to people who are willing to pay….but not to THEM!

It’s the Beginning of May = Patreon is OPEN!

At the beginning of each month is the best time to enroll onto my Patreon. Here’s what’s available for everyone on these specific badges.

Early Access Badge

For the Early Access Badge, you get ALL OF MY PODCASTS in advance, and considering that there are more than 30 podcasts that are scheduled between now and August, you can show your support by joining and contributing $5 a month to your favorite creator — ME!

Business English Podcast Badge

This one is priced at $30 a month and it includes a free hour of coaching (in any area of Business English + adding additional hours on would be only $25 an hour with free hours based on packages). Also, you get all the templates, vocabulary, grammar work, PDFs and everything that’s available for each lesson. This is specific for the Business English Podcast Badge. Also, you get either group/coaching or a live webinar with me each month!

TOEFL iBT

This is one of my famous badges, and although I will be making a switch to Podia to offer courses and other things (ESPECIALLY being charged at the date of your sign up instead of at the beginning of the month), this is a GREAT BADGE to TOEFL students because you get 2 free hours of coaching, 8 essay evaluations, and video recommendations. Also, you get 4 speaking evaluations a month, too. So the price tag is only $50 but you get over $200 worth of material + help!

TOEFL iTP, IELTS, TOEIC — Coming Soon

Based on recommendations and those who would like to have a membership in these areas….I will do surveys and wait for inquiries to come in.

Patreon

Follow me on IG and email me if you have inquiries!

IELTS | Listening | Diagram | IELTS Trainer: Old Water-mill

We’re back with another super special! Today I’ll be describing to you, in words, what I’m seeing. Then, you’ll be able to see how I’m able to follow the conversation because of it. This is going to be very useful for those of you who have difficulty with diagrams. So let’s get into it!

{Patreon Special} Arsenio’s Business English Podcast | Season 6: Episode 36 | Success & Change: Macro Achievement

Have you ever started something that you didn’t know would be very beneficial to humanity? I have — and it’s this podcast. When I started it just over 3 years ago, I had no idea that it would be the number 1 TOEFL, TOEIC and IELTS podcast across all big platforms. I found a niche market, provided a service, and now I have an amazingly growing community.

In today’s podcast, we’ll be discussing just that, and big achievements throughout our lives.

Patreon

IELTS | Reading | T/F/NG | Walking with Dinosaurs

We’re back! It’s been a long time since doing one of these videos, but I’m absolutely ecstatic to be bringing it to you, as always! Today, we’re going to be diving into each T/F/NG question so you guys have a more thorough understanding. So, let’s get into it!

Peter L. Falkingham and his colleagues at Manchester University are developing techniques that look set to revolutionize our understanding of how dinosaurs and other extinct animals behaved.

The media image of paleontologists who study prehistoric life is often of field workers camped in the desert in the hot sun, carefully picking away at the rock surrounding a large dinosaurs bone. But Peter Falkingham has done little of that for a while now. Instead, he devotes himself to his computer. Not because he has become inundated with paperwork, but because he is a new kind of paleontologist.

What few people may consider is that uncovering a skeleton, or discovering a new species, is where the research begins, not where it ends. What we really want to understand is how the extinct animals and plants behaved in their natural habitats. Drs Bill Sellers and Phil Manning from the University of Manchester use a ‘genetic algorithm’ — a kind of computer code that can change itself and ‘evolve’ — to explore how extinct animals like dinosaurs, and our own early ancestors, walked and stalked.

The Fossilized bones of a complete dinosaur skeleton can tell scientists a lot about the animal, but they do not make up the complete picture and the computer can try to fill the gap. The computer model is given a digitized skeleton, and the location of known muscles. The model then randomly activates the muscles. This, perhaps unsurprisingly, results almost without fail in the animal falling on its face. So the computer alters the activation pattern and tries again…. usually to a similar effect. the modeled ‘dinosaurs’ quickly ‘evolve’. If there is any improvement, the computer discards the old pattern and adopts the new one as the base for alteration. Eventually, the muscle activation pattern a stable way of moving, the best possible solution is reached, and the dinosaur can walk, run, chase or graze. Assuming natural selection evolves the best possible solution too, the modeled animal should be moving in a manner similar to its now-extinct counterpart. And indeed, using the same method for living animals (humans, emu and ostriches) similar top speeds were achieved on the computer as in reality. By comparing their cyberspace results with real measurements of living species, and Manchester team of paleontologists can be confident in the results computed showing how extinct prehistoric animals such as dinosaurs moved.

The Manchester University team has used computer simulations to produce a model of a giant meat-eating dinosaur. It is called an acrocanthosaurus which literally means ‘high spined lizard’ because of the spines which run along its backbone. It is not really known why they are there but scientists have speculated they could have supported a hump that stored fat and water reserves. There are also those who believe that the spines acted as a support for a sail. Of these, one half thinks it was used as a display and could be flushed with blood and the other half think it was used as a temperature-regulating device. It may have been a mixture of the two. The skull seems out of proportion with its thick, heavy body because it is so narrow and the jaws are delicate and fine. The feet are also worthy of note as they look surprisingly small in contrast to the animal as a whole. It has a deep broad tail and powerful leg muscles to aid locomotion. It walked on its back legs and its front legs were much shorter with powerful claws.

Falkingham himself is investigating fossilized tracks, or footprints, using computer simulations to help analyze how extinct animals moved. Modern-day trackers who study the habitats of wild animals can tell you what animal made a track, whether that animal was walking or running, sometimes even the sex of the animal. But a fossil track poses a more considerable challenge to interpret in the same way. A crucial consideration is knowing what the environment including the mud, or sediment, upon which the animal walked was like millions of years ago when the track was made. Experiments can answer these questions but the number of variables is staggering. To physically recreate each scenario with a box of mud is extremely time-consuming and difficult to repeat accurately. This is where computer simulation comes in.

Falkingham uses computational techniques to model a volume of mud and control the moisture content, consistency, and other conditions to simulate the mud of prehistoric times. A footprint is then made in the digital mud by a virtual foot. This footprint can be chopped up and viewed from any angle and stress values can be extracted and calculated from inside it. By running hundreds of these simulations simultaneously on supercomputers. Falkingham can start to understand what types of footprint would be expected if an animal moved in a certain way over a given kind of ground. Looking at the variation in the virtual tracks, researchers can make sense of fossil tracks with greater confidence.

The application of computational techniques in paleontology is becoming more prevalent every year. As computer power continues to increase, the range of problems that can be tackled and questions that can be answered will only expand.

  1. In his study of prehistoric life, Peter Falkingham rarely spends time on outdoor research these days.

The media image of paleontologists who study prehistoric life is often of field workers camped in the desert in the hot sun, carefully picking away at the rock surrounding a large dinosaurs bone. But Peter Falkingham has done little of that for a while now. Instead, he devotes himself to his computer. Not because he has become inundated with paperwork, but because he is a new kind of paleontologist.

2. Several attempts are usually needed before the computer model of a dinosaur used by Sellers and Manning manages to stay upright.

The Fossilized bones of a complete dinosaur skeleton can tell scientists a lot about the animal, but they do not make up the complete picture and the computer can try to fill the gap. The computer model is given a digitized skeleton, and the location of known muscles. The model then randomly activates the muscles. This, perhaps unsurprisingly, results almost without fail in the animal falling on its face. So the computer alters the activation pattern and tries again…. usually to a similar effect. the modeled ‘dinosaurs’ quickly ‘evolve’.

3. When the Sellers and Manning computer model was used for people, it showed them moving faster than they are physically able to.

Assuming natural selection evolves the best possible solution too, the modeled animal should be moving in a manner similar to its now-extinct counterpart. And indeed, using the same method for living animals (humans, emu and ostriches) similar top speeds were achieved on the computer as in reality.

4. Some paleontologists have expressed reservations about the conclusions reached by the Manchester team concerning the movement of dinosaurs.

There is no mention of other paleontologists; only the Manchester team.

5. An experienced tracker can analyze fossil footprints as easily as those made by live animals.

Falkingham himself is investigating fossilized tracks, or footprints, using computer simulations to help analyze how extinct animals moved. Modern-day trackers who study the habitats of wild animals can tell you what animal made a track, whether that animal was walking or running, sometimes even the sex of the animal. — THERE IS NO MENTION OF EXPERIENCED TRACKERS

6. Research carried out into the composition of prehistoric mud has been found to be inaccurate.

A crucial consideration is knowing what the environment including the mud, or sediment, upon which the animal walked was like millions of years ago when the track was made. Experiments can answer these questions but the number of variables is staggering. To physically recreate each scenario with a box of mud is extremely time-consuming and difficult to repeat accurately. This is where computer simulation comes in.

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