Business English Podcast | Investment | Episode 003 | All Levels | Retirement Planning

Business English podcast is back! And it’s back with a BANG!

I know, some of you are saying “retirement?! I’m trying to survive!” However, when your fight-or-flight system is engaged, your perception of life could also be foggy. This could be dangerous because you don’t have the end in mind/keeping your eye on the prize. When the dust is settled, dozens of countries will be trillions in debt; Disney has furloughed tens of thousands of employees; airlines have collapsed; and it continues to get worse.

People are saying “life will never be the same anymore!” Yeah, maybe it’s time for you to change your game. Perhaps it’s time for you to stop working for someone and begin working for yourself. We’re living in interesting times now with lots of downtime and time to also develop skills. So, it’s time to start thinking things through.

In the business english premium podcast, which is available down below in the link ($10 dollars a month or $100 dollars a year) you’re going to hear me discuss about retirement planning, emails from people who are looking into investment advisors, and also be able to work in potential groups and discuss different retirement products for a specific individual. And, after all that is finished, a listening!

Don’t miss out! My business English podcast is FIRE!

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RICH DAD POOR DAD | S5 – E45 | LESSON VII | OVERCOMING Arrogance

“What I know makes me money. What I don’t know loses me money. Every time I have been arrogant, I have lost money. Because when I’m arrogant, I truly believe that what I don’t know is not important,” rich dad would often tell me.

I have found that many people use arrogance to try to hide their own ignorance. It often happens when I am discussing financial statements with accountants or even other investors.

They try to bluster their way through the discussion. It is clear to me that they don’t know what they’re talking about. They’re not lying, but they are not telling the truth.

There are many people in the world of money, finances, and investments who have absolutely no idea what they’re talking about. Most people in the money industry are just spouting off sales pitches like used-car salesmen. When you know you are ignorant in a subject, start educating yourself by finding an expert in the field or a book on the subject.

RICH DAD POOR DAD | S5 – E44 | LESSON VII | OVERCOMING Bad Habits

When I decided to exit the Rat Race, it was simply a question
of “How can I afford to never work again?” And my mind began to kick out answers and solutions. The hardest part was fighting my real parents’ dogma: “We can’t afford that.” “Stop thinking only about yourself.” “Why don’t you think about others?” and other similar sentiments designed to instill guilt to suppress my “greed.”

Rich Dad Poor Dad

Too much greed, however, as anything in excess can be, is not good. But just remember what Michael Douglas said in the movie Wall Street: “Greed is good.” Rich dad said it differently: “Guilt is worse than greed, for guilt robs the body of its soul.” I think Eleanor Roosevelt said it best: “Do what you feel in your heart to be right—for you’ll be criticized anyway. You’ll be damned if you do, and damned if you don’t.”

The Story

Our lives are a reflection of our habits more than our education. After seeing the movie Conan the Barbarian, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, a friend said, “I’d love to have a body like Schwarzenegger.” Most of the guys nodded in agreement.

“I even heard he was really puny and skinny at one time,” another friend added.

“Yeah, I heard that too,” another one said. “I heard he has a habit of working out almost every day in the gym.”

“Yeah, I’ll bet he has to.”

“Nah,” said the group cynic. “I’ll bet he was born that way. Besides, let’s stop talking about Arnold and get some beers.”

This is an example of habits controlling behavior. I remember asking my rich dad about the habits of the rich. Instead of answering me outright, he wanted me to learn through example, as usual.

“When does your dad pay his bills?” rich dad asked. “The first of the month,” I said.
“Does he have anything left over?” he asked.
“Very little,” I said.

“That’s the main reason he struggles,” said rich dad. “He has
bad habits. Your dad pays everyone else first. He pays himself last, but only if he has anything left over.”

“Which he usually doesn’t,” I said. “But he has to pay his bills, doesn’t he? You’re saying he shouldn’t pay his bills?”

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RICH DAD POOR DAD | S5 – E43 | LESSON VII | OVERCOMING Laziness

Busy people are often the most lazy. We have all heard stories of a businessman who works hard to earn money. He works hard to be a good provider for his wife and children. He spends long hours at the office and brings work home on weekends. One day he comes home to an empty house. His wife has left with the kids. He knew he and his wife had problems, but rather than work to make the relationship strong, he stayed busy at work. Dismayed, his performance at work slips and he loses his job.

Today, I often meet people who are too busy to take care of their wealth. And there are people too busy to take care of their health. The cause is the same. They’re busy, and they stay busy as a way of avoiding something they do not want to face. Nobody has to tell them. Deep down they know. In fact, if you remind them, they often respond with anger or irritation.

If they aren’t busy at work or with the kids, they’re often busy watching TV, fishing, playing golf, or shopping. Yet deep down they know they are avoiding something important. That’s the most common form of laziness: laziness by staying busy.

Rich dad forbade the words, “I can’t afford it.” In my real home, that’s all I heard. Instead, rich dad required his children to say, “How can I afford it?” He believed that the words “I can’t afford it” shut down your brain. It didn’t have to think anymore. “How can I afford it?” opened up the brain and forced it to think and search for answers.

But most importantly, he felt the words, “I can’t afford it,” were
a lie. And the human spirit knows it. “The human spirit is very, very powerful,” he would say. “It knows it can do anything.” By having a lazy mind that says, “I can’t afford it,” a war breaks out inside you. Your spirit is angry, and your lazy mind must defend its lie. The spirit is screaming, “Come on. Let’s go to the gym and work out.” And the lazy mind says, “But I’m tired. I worked really hard today.” Or the human spirit says, “I’m sick and tired of being poor. Let’s get out there and get rich.” To which the lazy mind says, “Rich people are greedy. Besides it’s too much bother. It’s not safe. I might lose money. I’m working hard enough as it is. I’ve got too much to do at work anyway. Look at what I have to do tonight. My boss wants it finished by morning.”

“I can’t afford it” also causes sadness, a helplessness that leads
to despondency and often depression. “How can I afford it?” opens
up possibilities, excitement, and dreams. So rich dad was not so concerned about what we wanted to buy as long as we understood that “How can I afford it?” creates a stronger mind and a dynamic spirit.

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Rich Dad Poor Dad | S5 – E42 | Lesson VII | Overcoming Cynicism Part II

My point is that it’s those doubts and cynicism that keep most people poor and playing it safe. The real world is simply waiting for you to get rich. Only a person’s doubts keep them poor. As I said, getting out of the Rat Race is technically easy. It doesn’t take much education, but those doubts are cripplers for most people.

“Cynics never win,” said rich dad. “Unchecked doubt and fear creates a cynic.” “Cynics criticize, and winners analyze” was another of his favorite sayings. Rich dad explained that criticism blinded while analysis opened eyes. Analysis allowed winners to see that critics were blind, and to see opportunities that everyone else missed. And finding what people miss is key to any success.

Rich Dad Poor Dad

This is a story of my life. Am I playing it safe by staying here in Thailand for 7 years? Full story in podcast down below.

Real estate is a powerful investment tool for anyone seeking financial independence or freedom. It is a unique investment tool.
Yet every time I mention real estate as a vehicle, I often hear, “I don’t want to fix toilets.” That’s what Peter Lynch calls noise. That’s what
my rich dad would say is the cynic talking, someone who criticizes and does not analyze, someone who lets their doubts and fears close their mind instead of open their eyes.

So when someone says, “I don’t want to fix toilets,” I want to fire back, “What makes you think I want to?” They’re saying a toilet is more important than what they want. I talk about freedom from the Rat Race, and they focus on toilets. That is the thought pattern that keeps most people poor. They criticize instead of analyze.

“I-don’t-wants hold the key to your success,” rich dad would say. Because I, too, do not want to fix toilets, I shop hard for a property manager who does fix toilets. And by finding a great property manager who runs houses or apartments, well, my cash flow goes up. But, more importantly, a great property manager allows me to buy a lot more real estate since I don’t have to fix toilets. A great property manager is key to success in real estate. Finding a good manager is more important to me than the real estate. A great property manager often hears of great deals before real estate agents do, which makes them even more valuable.

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RICH DAD POOR DAD | S5 – E41 | LESSON VII | Overcoming Cynicism

Overcoming Cynicism

“The sky is falling! The sky is falling!” Most of us know the story of Chicken Little who ran around warning the barnyard of impending doom. We all know people who are that way. There’s a Chicken Little inside each of us.

As I stated earlier, the cynic is really a little chicken. We all get a little chicken when fear and doubt cloud our thoughts. All of us have doubts: “I’m not smart.” “I’m not good enough.” “So-and-so is better than me.” Our doubts often paralyze us. We play the “What if?” game. “What if the economy crashes right after I invest?” “What if I lose control and I can’t pay the money back?” “What if things don’t go as I planned?” Or we have friends or loved ones who will remind us of our shortcomings. They often say, “What makes you think you can do that?” “If it’s such a good idea, how come someone else hasn’t done it?” “That will never work. You don’t know what you’re talking about.” These words of doubt often get so loud that we fail to act. A horrible feeling builds in our stomach. Sometimes we can’t sleep. We fail to move forward. So we stay with what is safe, and opportunities pass us by. We watch life passing by as we sit immobilized with a cold knot in our body. We have all felt this at one time in our lives, some more than others.

When violence breaks out in a city, gun sales go up all over the country. A person dies from rare hamburger meat in the state of Washington, and the Arizona Health Department orders restaurants to have all beef cooked well-done. A drug company runs a TV commercial in February showing people catching the flu. Colds go up as well as sales of cold medicine.

Most people are poor because, when it comes to investing, the world is filled with Chicken Littles running around yelling, “The sky
is falling! The sky is falling!” And Chicken Littles are effective, because every one of us is a little chicken. It often takes great courage to not
let rumors and talk of doom and gloom affect your doubts and fears. But a savvy investor knows that the seemingly worst of times is actually the best of times to make money. When everyone else is too afraid to act, they pull the trigger and are rewarded.

RICH DAD POOR DAD | S5 – E40 | LESSON VII | Stories of Failures

In my own life, I’ve noticed that winning usually follows losing. Before I finally learned to ride a bike, I first fell down many times. I’ve never met a golfer who has never lost a golf ball. I’ve never met people who have fallen in love who have never had their heart broken. And I’ve never met someone rich who has never lost money.

Rich Dad Poor Dad
  • Riding a bike
  • Women
  • Track & Field
  • Video Games (Blitz 2003)

“Texans don’t bury their failures. They get inspired by them. They take their failures and turn them into rallying cries. Failure inspires Texans to become winners. But that formula is not just the formula for Texans. It is the formula for all winners.”

“I always tried to turn every disaster into an opportunity.” John D. Rockefeller

If you hate losing, play it safe. If losing makes you weak, play it safe. Go with balanced investments. If you’re over 25 years old and are terrified of taking risks, don’t change. Play it safe, but start early. Start accumulating your nest egg early because it will take time.

But if you have dreams of freedom—of getting out of the Rat Race—the first question to ask yourself is, “How do I respond to failure?” If failure inspires you to win, maybe you should go for it—but only maybe. If failure makes you weak or causes you to throw temper tantrums—like spoiled brats who call attorneys to file lawsuits every time something doesn’t go their way—then play it safe. Keep your daytime job. Or buy bonds or mutual funds. But remember, there is risk in those financial instruments also, even though they may appear safe.

Rich Dad Poor Dad | S5 – E39 | Lesson VII | Overcoming obstacles

Once people have studied and become financially literate, they may still face roadblocks to becoming financially independent. There are five main reasons why financially literate people may still not develop abundant asset columns that could produce a large cash flow. The five reasons are:

  1. Fear
  2. Cynicism
  3. Laziness
  4. Bad habits
  5. Arrogance

I have never met anyone who really likes losing money. And in all my years, I have never met a rich person who has never lost money. But I have met a lot of poor people who have never lost a dime— investing, that is.

The fear of losing money is real. Everyone has it. Even the rich. But it’s not having fear that is the problem. It’s how you handle fear. It’s how you handle losing. It’s how you handle failure that makes the difference in one’s life. The primary difference between a rich person and a poor person is how they manage that fear.

It’s okay to be fearful. It’s okay to be a coward when it comes to money. You can still be rich. We’re all heroes at something, and cowards at something else. My friend’s wife is an emergency-room nurse. When she sees blood, she flies into action. When I mention investing, she runs away. When I see blood, I don’t run. I pass out.

My rich dad understood phobias about money. “Some people are terrified of snakes. Some people are terrified about losing money. Both are phobias,” he would say. So his solution to the phobia of losing money was this little rhyme: “If you hate risk and worry, start early.”

Business English Podcast | Sales | Episode 001 | All Levels | Marketing, Communication, Prospecting

Welcome! If this is your first time knowing, I do have a Business English Premium podcast that’s PRETTY AMAZING. Currently right now, if you are one of the three first sign-ups on the podcast, you would get 2 free coaching hours (1 each month) with the premium. So, that’s something to surely look forward because the price tags on learning business English, soft-skills and coaching in general could be a tad pricey for some out there.

That’s number 1. Number two, this podcast features a lot of different things such as sales, investment products, supply chain and demand, corporate finance, and more. Because I’ve done a many of different projects around Bangkok with companies, I’m now implementing an array of different things into my podcast.

So, with that being said, I will talk about the five popular lead-generation magnets, as well as the importance behind marketing, communication, and prospecting. I’ve been teaching prospecting and sales to a private student here in Bangkok who runs multiple businesses and it’s so interesting to hear what her ideas are about it.

After that, you will be able to ask me questions about lead-generation magnets, which ones are useful, other ones you might add, and how successful are you at them.

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RICH DAD POOR DAD | S5 – E38 | LESSON VI | People Skills

Today, I meet ex-schoolteachers earning hundreds of thousands of dollars a year. They earn that much because they have specialized skills in their field as well as other skills. They can teach, as well as sell and market. I know of no other skills to be more important than selling and marketing. The skills of selling and marketing are difficult for most people, primarily due to their fear of rejection. The better you are at communicating, negotiating, and handling your fear of rejection, the easier life is. Just as I advised that newspaper writer who wanted to become a best-selling author, I advise anyone else today.

Rich Dad Poor Dad

Being technically specialized has its strengths as well as its weaknesses. I have friends who are geniuses, but they cannot communicate effectively with other human beings and, as a result, their earnings are pitiful.
I advise them to just spend a year learning to sell. Even if they earn nothing, their communication skills will improve. And that is priceless.

Rich Dad Poor Dad

In addition to being good learners, sellers, and marketers, we need to be good teachers as well as good students. To be truly rich, we need to be able to give as well as to receive. In cases of financial or professional struggle, there is often a lack of giving and receiving. I know many people who are poor because they are neither good students nor good teachers.

Rich Dad Poor Dad

My educated dad always said, “When I have some extra money, I’ll give it.” The problem was that there was never any extra. So he worked harder to draw more money in, rather than focus on the most important law of money: “Give, and you shall receive.” Instead, he believed in: “Receive, and then you give.”

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