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Rich Dad Poor Dad | S5 – E48 | Lesson VIII | Steps to Develop Your Powers #6 Use Assets to Buy Luxuries

A friend’s child has been developing a nasty habit of burning a hole in his pocket. Just 16, he wanted his own car. The excuse: “All his friends’ parents gave their kids cars.” The child wanted to go into his savings and use it for a down payment. That was when his father called me and then came to see me.

“Do you think I should let him do it, or should I just buy him a car?”

I answered, “It might relieve the pressure in the short term, but what have you taught him in the long term? Can you use this desire to own a car and inspire your son to learn something?” Suddenly the lights went on, and he hurried home.

Two months later I ran into my friend again. “Does your son have his new car?” I asked.

“No, he doesn’t. But I gave him $3,000 for the car. I told him to use my money instead of his college money.”

“Well, that’s generous of you,” I said.
“Not really. The money came with a hitch.”

As I said earlier, if a person cannot master the power of self- discipline, it is best not to try to get rich. I say this because, although the process of developing cash flow from an asset column is easy in theory, what’s hard is the mental fortitude to direct money to the correct use. Due to external temptations, it is much easier in today’s consumer world to simply blow money out the expense column. With weak mental fortitude, that money flows into the paths of
least resistance. That is the cause of poverty and financial struggle.

Rich Dad Poor Dad

Relationships, Friendships, & Intimacy | Carla Trigo

Amazing podcast with Carla Trigo! I brought Carla on about a year ago today, and now she’s come back on to share some tips and give you guidance in terms of relationships and how to openly communicate. Because the restrictions of movement around the world, not only has domestic violence risen significantly but also divorces. Why? People are at home and they have to face what ISN’T working. In saying that, here is some bulletpoints on what we talk about with the podcast link below.

  • Not forcing friendships
  • Being spontaneous in a relationship
  • Roles within a relationship
  • Face what isn’t working
  • Essential oils and smells that arouse both men and women

Superhero Course with Mira: https://www.udemy.com/share/102VSm/

Spotify – https://open.spotify.com/show/0x39CEN5tHvfRtfZaAMTgQ

Podcast – https://www.spreaker.com/show/arsenio…

Podcast on iTunes – https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/t…

Podcast on Stitcher – https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/arse…

Podcast on SoundCloud – https://soundcloud.com/arsenio-buck/g…

YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIzp…

Facebook – The Arsenio Buck Show – Home | Facebook

Twitter – https://twitter.com/arseniobuckshow?l…

Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/thearseniob…

Website – https://thearseniobuckshow.com/

Q & A – ArsenioBuck@icloud.com

LinkedIn – https://www.linkedin.com/in/arsenio-b…

Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/thearseniobuckshow/?hl=en

The Arsenio Buck Foundation: https://thearseniobuckshow.com/?p=8676

RICH DAD POOR DAD | S5 – E45 | LESSON VII | OVERCOMING Arrogance

“What I know makes me money. What I don’t know loses me money. Every time I have been arrogant, I have lost money. Because when I’m arrogant, I truly believe that what I don’t know is not important,” rich dad would often tell me.

I have found that many people use arrogance to try to hide their own ignorance. It often happens when I am discussing financial statements with accountants or even other investors.

They try to bluster their way through the discussion. It is clear to me that they don’t know what they’re talking about. They’re not lying, but they are not telling the truth.

There are many people in the world of money, finances, and investments who have absolutely no idea what they’re talking about. Most people in the money industry are just spouting off sales pitches like used-car salesmen. When you know you are ignorant in a subject, start educating yourself by finding an expert in the field or a book on the subject.

RICH DAD POOR DAD | S5 – E41 | LESSON VII | Overcoming Cynicism

Overcoming Cynicism

“The sky is falling! The sky is falling!” Most of us know the story of Chicken Little who ran around warning the barnyard of impending doom. We all know people who are that way. There’s a Chicken Little inside each of us.

As I stated earlier, the cynic is really a little chicken. We all get a little chicken when fear and doubt cloud our thoughts. All of us have doubts: “I’m not smart.” “I’m not good enough.” “So-and-so is better than me.” Our doubts often paralyze us. We play the “What if?” game. “What if the economy crashes right after I invest?” “What if I lose control and I can’t pay the money back?” “What if things don’t go as I planned?” Or we have friends or loved ones who will remind us of our shortcomings. They often say, “What makes you think you can do that?” “If it’s such a good idea, how come someone else hasn’t done it?” “That will never work. You don’t know what you’re talking about.” These words of doubt often get so loud that we fail to act. A horrible feeling builds in our stomach. Sometimes we can’t sleep. We fail to move forward. So we stay with what is safe, and opportunities pass us by. We watch life passing by as we sit immobilized with a cold knot in our body. We have all felt this at one time in our lives, some more than others.

When violence breaks out in a city, gun sales go up all over the country. A person dies from rare hamburger meat in the state of Washington, and the Arizona Health Department orders restaurants to have all beef cooked well-done. A drug company runs a TV commercial in February showing people catching the flu. Colds go up as well as sales of cold medicine.

Most people are poor because, when it comes to investing, the world is filled with Chicken Littles running around yelling, “The sky
is falling! The sky is falling!” And Chicken Littles are effective, because every one of us is a little chicken. It often takes great courage to not
let rumors and talk of doom and gloom affect your doubts and fears. But a savvy investor knows that the seemingly worst of times is actually the best of times to make money. When everyone else is too afraid to act, they pull the trigger and are rewarded.

RICH DAD POOR DAD | S5 – E40 | LESSON VII | Stories of Failures

In my own life, I’ve noticed that winning usually follows losing. Before I finally learned to ride a bike, I first fell down many times. I’ve never met a golfer who has never lost a golf ball. I’ve never met people who have fallen in love who have never had their heart broken. And I’ve never met someone rich who has never lost money.

Rich Dad Poor Dad
  • Riding a bike
  • Women
  • Track & Field
  • Video Games (Blitz 2003)

“Texans don’t bury their failures. They get inspired by them. They take their failures and turn them into rallying cries. Failure inspires Texans to become winners. But that formula is not just the formula for Texans. It is the formula for all winners.”

“I always tried to turn every disaster into an opportunity.” John D. Rockefeller

If you hate losing, play it safe. If losing makes you weak, play it safe. Go with balanced investments. If you’re over 25 years old and are terrified of taking risks, don’t change. Play it safe, but start early. Start accumulating your nest egg early because it will take time.

But if you have dreams of freedom—of getting out of the Rat Race—the first question to ask yourself is, “How do I respond to failure?” If failure inspires you to win, maybe you should go for it—but only maybe. If failure makes you weak or causes you to throw temper tantrums—like spoiled brats who call attorneys to file lawsuits every time something doesn’t go their way—then play it safe. Keep your daytime job. Or buy bonds or mutual funds. But remember, there is risk in those financial instruments also, even though they may appear safe.

Rich Dad Poor Dad | S5 – E29 | Lesson V | Continuation of Investing

$40,000 is created in the asset column. Money is invented without being taxed. At 10 percent interest, $4,000 a year in cash flow is added to income. – Robert Kiyosaki

During this depressed market, Kim and I were able to do six of these simple transactions in our spare time. While the bulk of our money was in larger properties and the stock market, we were able to create more than $190,000 in assets (notes at 10 percent interest) in those six “buy, create, and sell” transactions. That comes to approximately $19,000
a year income, much of it sheltered through our private corporation. Much of that $19,000 a year goes to pay for our company cars, gas, trips, insurance, dinners with clients, and other things. By the time the government gets a chance to tax that income, it’s been spent on legally allowed pre-tax expenses.

Rich dad Poor Dad

During this depressed market, Kim and I were able to do six of these simple transactions in our spare time. While the bulk of our money was in larger properties and the stock market, we were able to create more than $190,000 in assets (notes at 10 percent interest) in those six “buy, create, and sell” transactions. That comes to approximately $19,000 a year income, much of it sheltered through our private corporation. Much of that $19,000 a year goes to pay for our company cars, gas, trips, insurance, dinners with clients, and other things. By the time the government gets a chance to tax that income, it’s been spent on legally allowed pre-tax expenses.

This was a simple example of how money is invented, created, and protected using financial intelligence.

Ask yourself: How long would it take to save $190,000? Would the bank pay you 10 percent interest on your money? And the promissory note is good for 30 years. I hope they never pay me the $190,000. I have to pay a tax if they pay me the principal, and besides, $19,000 paid over 30 years is a little over $500,000 in income.

I have people ask what happens if the person doesn’t pay. That does happen, and it’s good news. That $60,000 home could be taken back and re-sold for $70,000, and another $2,500 collected as a loan-processing fee. It would still be a zero-down transaction in the mind of the new buyer. And the process would go on.

The first time I sold the house, I paid back the $2,000, so technically, I have no money in the transaction. My return on investment (ROI) is infinity. It’s an example of no money making a lot of money.

In the second transaction, when re-sold, I would have put $2,000 in my pocket and re-extended the loan to 30 years. What would my ROI be if I got paid money to make money? I do not know, but it sure beats saving $100 a month, which actually starts out as $150 because it’s after- tax income for 40 years earning low interest. And again, you’re taxed on the interest. That is not too intelligent. It may be safe, but it’s not smart.

A few years later, as the Phoenix real estate market strengthened, those houses we sold for $60,000 became worth $110,000. Foreclosure opportunities were still available, but became rare. It cost a valuable asset, my time, to go out looking for them. Thousands of buyers were looking for the few available deals. The market had changed. It was time to move on and look for other opportunities to put in the asset column.

“You can’t do that here.” “That is against the law.” “You’re lying.”
I hear those comments much more often than “Can you show me how to do that?” The math is simple. You do not need algebra or calculus. And the escrow company handles the legal transaction and the servicing of the payments. I have no roofs to fix or toilets to unplug because the owners do that. It’s their house. Occasionally someone does not pay. And that is wonderful because there are late fees, or they move out and the property is sold again.

Rich Dad Poor Dad | S5 – E23 | Lesson IV | The History of Taxes & The Power of Corporations

I remember in school being told the story of Robin Hood and
his Merry Men. My teacher thought it was a wonderful story of a romantic hero who robbed from the rich and gave to the poor. My rich dad did not see Robin Hood as a hero. He called Robin Hood a crook.

Robin Hood may be long gone, but his followers live on. I often still hear people say, “Why don’t the rich pay for it?” or “The rich should pay more in taxes and give it to the poor.”

It is this Robin Hood fantasy, or taking from the rich to give to the poor, that has caused the most pain for the poor and the middle class. The reason the middle class is so heavily taxed is because of the Robin Hood ideal. The reality is that the rich are not taxed. It’s the middle class, especially the educated upper-income middle class, who pays for the poor.

Again, to understand fully how things happen, we need to look at the history of taxes. Although my highly educated dad was an expert on the history of education, my rich dad fashioned himself as an expert on the history of taxes.

Rich Dad Poor Dad

Rich Dad Poor Dad | S5 – E22 | Assets you DON’T Have to Follow!

So what kind of assets am I suggesting that you or your children acquire? In my world, real assets fall into the following categories:

  • Businesses that do not require my presence I own them, but they are managed or run by other people. If I have to work there, it’s not a business. It becomes my job.
  • Stocks
  • Bonds
  • Income-generating real estate
  • Notes (IOUs)
  • Royalties from intellectual property such as music, scripts, and patents
  • Anything else that has value, produces income or appreciates, and has a ready market

As a young boy, my educated dad encouraged me to find a safe job. But my rich dad encouraged me to begin acquiring assets that I loved.
“If you don’t love it, you won’t take care of it.” I collect real estate simply because I love buildings and land. I love shopping for them, and I could look at them all day long. When problems arise, the problems aren’t so bad that it changes my love for real estate. For people who hate real estate, they shouldn’t buy it.

I also love stocks of small companies, especially start-ups, because I am an entrepreneur, not a corporate person. In my early years,
I worked in large organizations, such as Standard Oil of California, the U.S. Marine Corps, and Xerox Corp. I enjoyed my time with those organizations and have fond memories, but I know deep down I am not a company man. I like starting companies, not running them. So my stock buys are usually of small companies.

Rich Dad Poor Dad

When I say mind your own business, I mean to build and keep your asset column strong. Once a dollar goes into it, never let it come out. Think of it this way: Once a dollar goes into your asset column, it becomes your employee. The best thing about money is that it works 24 hours a day and can work for generations. Keep your day job, be a great hardworking employee, but keep building that asset column.

As your cash flow grows, you can indulge in some luxuries. An important distinction is that rich people buy luxuries last, while the poor and middle class tend to buy luxuries first. The poor and the middle class often buy luxury items like big houses, diamonds, furs, jewelry, or boats because they want to look rich. They look rich, but in reality they just get deeper in debt on credit. The old-money people, the long-term rich, build their asset column first. Then the income generated from the asset column buys their luxuries. The poor and middle class buy luxuries with their own sweat, blood, and children’s inheritance.

Rich Dad Poor Dad | S5 – E21 |You Become What You Study

A problem with school is that you often become what you study. So if you study cooking, you become a chef. If you study the law, you become an attorney, and a study of auto mechanics makes you a mechanic. The mistake in becoming what you study is that too many people forget to mind their own business. They spend their lives minding someone else’s business and making that person rich.

To become financially secure, a person needs to mind their own business. Your business revolves around your asset column, not your income column. As stated earlier, the number-one rule is to know the difference between an asset and a liability, and to buy assets.

The rich focus on their asset columns, while everyone else focuses on their income statements.

That is why we hear so often: “I need a raise.” “If only I had a promotion.” “I am going back to school to get more training so I

Financial struggle is often the result of people working all their lives for someone else.

can get a better job.” “I am going to work overtime.” “Maybe I can get a second job.” In some circles, these are sensible ideas. But you are still not minding your own business. These ideas all still focus on the income column and will only help a person become more financially secure if the additional money is used to purchase income- generating assets.

The primary reason the majority of the poor and middle class are fiscally conservative—which means, “I can’t afford to take risks”— is that they have no financial foundation. They have to cling to their jobs and play it safe.

So many people have put themselves in deep financial trouble when they run short of income. To raise cash, they sell their assets. But their personal assets can generally be sold for only a fraction of the value that is listed on their personal balance sheet. Or if there is
a gain on the sale of the assets, they are taxed on the gain. So again, the government takes its share, thus reducing the amount available to help them out of debt. That is why I say someone’s net worth is often “worth less” than they think.

Start minding your own business. Keep your daytime job, but start buying real assets, not liabilities or personal effects that have no real value once you get them home. A new car loses nearly 25 percent of the price you pay for it the moment you drive it off the lot.

Rich Dad Poor Dad

Keep expenses low, reduce liabilities, and diligently build a base of solid assets. For young people who have not yet left home, it is important for parents to teach them the difference between an asset and a liability. Get them to start building a solid asset column before they leave home, get married, buy a house, have kids, and get stuck in a risky financial position, clinging to a job, and buying everything on credit. I see so many young couples who get married and trap themselves into a lifestyle that will not let them get out of debt for most of their working years.