Bangkok International Digital Content Festival Registration Link!

Here it is! Free registration to my presentation coming up in two days. If you want to learn how to maximize your eLearning product, soft skills, brainstorming techniques or just learning how to maximize social media — this presentation is for you! Click the link down below.

Registration Link

Can Facebook & Google top Zoom? NOT!

I’ll try making this as unbiased as possible.

Because the COVID pandemic, tutors in Thailand have profited massively from it. Meanwhile, language centers have completely dithered and fallen apart because they were romantically in love with the past. In saying that, zoom’s profit, around the world, has skyrocketed 1,300 percent because from the schools in America, to every other country in the world….zoom is a MASSIVE HIT.

It took a pandemic to boost the stock to unforeseen heights…and that wasn’t overnight. This was a 9-year making.

Then Mark, the man we are still unsure about the entire Cambridge Analytica and how he helped Trump win the election, has launched his own platform. He’s trying to sway people from zoom and for them to come on Facebook messengers live video with over 50 participants, but we all know how bad Facebook calls and videos are.

When it comes to chat applications in general, they honestly don’t do well. Viber is probably the best when it comes to making phone calls, but anytime I’m on Facebook or Line, the voice fades and video continuously freezes.

Brandy Loyalty?

Like Apple, Facebook has their fans. Although they’ve misconstrued algorithms and they’re forcing you to buy ads to have a more significant reach, the tides have completely changed on both Facebook and Instagram. Before, Instagram hashtags were fantastic at bringing newcomers onboard. I’m talking circa 2018. Now, it’s impossible to get anyone from hashtags because now that Facebook owns Instagram, that mentality has spilled over to IG, too. My highest video reach always involves younger women being interviewed with me. In videos that I have a strong message — forget about it.

So will Facebook enthusiasts make a drastic change from the zoom platform to stick with their guns at Facebook? Or will someone like myself, who’s been using zoom for over a year, make a change because it’s free?

Google Hangouts = Bottom of the barrell

As I was sitting at my desk listening to a group of 5 students give their presentation with the program director of Waterloo University, the audio was in and out. I can count a handful of times where it just didn’t work, and that was a frustrating experience. However, google is FREE. So anytime you use something for FREE, don’t expect it to be its full 100%. Zoom, which has an astronomically better platform than any other videos service, especially social media, is a paid one — 40 minutes of group chat is all you get. When it comes to schools, however, they are upgraded for free — which is a cool perk.

But going back to google, the features just aren’t there. You can’t use audio from your computer, whiteboard material, file sharing, etc. Some people would say “you can,” but it’s not like zoom.

The last time I used google was when I had to give a 20-minute presentation to a group of employees from a company here in BKK. When I first joined the room, the audio was gone. I couldn’t hear a damn thing…so I had to restart my Mac and sure enough — it began working. Just imagine if it was a live interview and google did that to me? So much for getting a job! That’s unreliability at its finest, and because Google likes to depict places in the world as being bad (Africa — off topic, but true)….I would NEVER use their platform as a reliable service.

Conclusion

Mark loves competition, but his product is faulty. Facebook pages and algorithms have taken a significant hit, and because of it, someone who has a group of 800,000 people would only get 1000 video likes because notifications don’t pop up for the other 99%. Facebook has intentionally orchestrated this, and if they’re not in it for the best interest of the end user, I would NEVER support a new service…especially someone that they rollout just to make a quick buck.

Google almost lost me a potential job because their platform is shambolic…and I think that’s all that needs to be said.

What Is an ICO?

Do you remember the once popular way for new startups to raise funds that didn’t need venture capital — which was highly selective because of the return on investment? It was known as the initial coin offering (ICO). Initial coin offering offers investors with units of crypto-tokens in the forms of Ethereum and Bitcoin.

Some venture capitalist firms even believed that the ICO can disrupt the traditional IPO, or initial public offering, for a company who wants to list their company on the stock exchange to raise funds for their business like their offshoot crowdfunding platform Kickstarter and Indiegogo. However, the difference between ICO and crowdfunding is where ICO is set to fund blockchain based startups and blockchain based projects, normally, it is done in a presale and it has been very successful.

How does an ICO work?

I still remember listening to a podcast which a couple of people were talking about the potential of ICO for startups — especially blockchain based startups and decentralised apps startups. All of these startups became alternatives to the current startups that brought innovation and disrupted the current market like Airbnb that disrupted the traditional hotels’ business model — while Uber had disrupted the traditional cabbies in San Francisco business model, which had highly monopolised the market. These business models were known as the crowd based or marketplaces which were based on trust by both parties.

ICO is an offshoot of crowdfunding where a project or a startup founder decided to run a campaign to collect funds for its project from strangers. Even a Malaysian social enterprise startup that allows college or university students to launch their campaign like Kickstarter to finance their studies without student loans. However, the only difference here will be a token sale being offered to you and you can trade the token on cryptocurrency in a pre-sale. One of the easiest token sales will be the Ethereum token with its market capitalisation and it was done with the Ethereum smart contract app.

The most popular Ether will be the decentralised autonomous organisation (DAO), which is a distributed investment company that’s fuelled by Ethereum. An investor can receive some Ether DAO token with their market price and enable an investor to participate in the DAO governance. Since then, DAO is the blueprint for fundraising and crowdfunding for startups and projects. However, the risk of being hacked is higher compared to traditional fundraising through a venture capital firm or a crowdfunding platform because DAO is vulnerable to hacking and fraud.

Examples for successful Initial coin offering on Ethereum are:

Augur

Melonport

Golem

ICONOMI

Singular DTV

First Blood

Digix DAO.

They are many ICOs for them to explore new ways to connect the application with the token and to leverage smart contracts to keep an ICO secure and mitigate risks for investors to invest. The future of ICO is immense because it enables everyone and companies to easily trade tokens and raise funds freely. This will make the investment and stock trading more inclusive as social entrepreneurs, tech company founders, startup founders and Bill Gates had been envisioned by them. Here is when the global financial system will be disrupted.

Legality

ICO is still a grey matter, but the regulators are aware of them and start to regulate them while other jurisdictions are adopting a wait and see in the latest development of these new horizons.

Interviewee #029: Anand Bhimjiyani – Affiliate Marketing

Finally, after 2-3 long years (and a failed interview session back in December of 2017), I’ve gotten the opportunity to bring on Anand to share us a thing or two about affiliate marketing! I’m super excited about what’s to come, so I hope you guys enjoy this and are able to take away from things from it.

Get in touch with Anand Bhimjiyani

Links:

Things we discussed:

The passions and figuring out what his passions were.

What is marketing?

How the guest started.

Core beliefs and values.

What he wanted to learn instead of being an engineer.

The dark moments.

Entrepreneurship.

Mediocrity.

What affiliate marketing is.

Marketing and the message to influencers.

How do you start with affiliate marketing? Sharing about affiliate marketing strategy.

The success of affiliate marketing is being people-centric.

The power of giving content away and referral marketing.

How to find a niche and the consequences when mistakes are made.

The real secrets of affiliate marketing.

Anand’s favorite part of affiliate marketing.

How does an individual start with affiliate marketing.

The real reason why you should learn from mentors who are successful in affiliate marketing.

Listen to “Interviewee #029: Anand Bhimjiyani – Affiliate Marketing” on Spreaker.

Thank you for listening!

 

Links:

  1. Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/thearseniobuckshow/
  2. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thearseniobuckshow/?hl=en
  3. YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIzp4EdbJVMhhSnq_0u4ntA
  4. Podcasts: https://www.spreaker.com/user/thearseniobuckshow, https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-arsenio-buck-show/id1181794790?mt=2, https://open.spotify.com/show/0x39CEN5tHvfRtfZaAMTgQ?si=8cpdu1rTTjKHogufXh91Cw
  5. Website: https://thearseniobuckshow.com/
  6. Twitter: https://twitter.com/arseniobuckshow?lang=en

Interviewee #027 – Gerri Cortez on Thailand & Personal Brand Building

Born and raised in Sydney, Australia, Gerri went through a mid-life crisis before being inspired by a friend’s physique. She then ventured off to Phuket Thailand where she was only supposed to stay for 4 months, but then it turned into 5 years. After that, digital marketing, personal branding, SEO and so many things (ecommerce) came into play. Here’s 1 of the first to this series!

Get in touch with Gerri Cortez

Links:

Things we discussed:

Thailand and her internal feelings, places that she visited and about Muay Thai.

Her experience in Phuket and Muay Thai gyms.

Talked about Muay Thai boxing and its training.

Dropshipping business and earning an income online.

Shared about the interviewee’s experience in sales funnels, social media marketing, sourcing for dropshipping business and tough times in running a drop shipping business.

Shared about the discovery of her crowdfunding platform, Kickstarter and her learning curve in sales, building an online store and bad operation costs of running a dropshipping business, as well as selling online.

Digital marketing skill, being a copywriter and an affiliate SEO.

Personal branding.

Instagram Marketing.

How does a beginner start with personal branding. Why is personal branding essential.

Creating content that people want.

How to monetize your personal branding once you build a community through social media.

Affiliate marketing and how to utilize it.

Sharing about how to create an online presence and online image through social media channels.

Sharing on how to engage and create value for your audiences.

Podcasting.

Listen to “Interviewee #027 – Gerri Cortes on Thailand & Personal Brand Building” on Spreaker.

 

Thank you for listening!

Share this to your social media!

Links:

  1. Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/thearseniobuckshow/
  2. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thearseniobuckshow/?hl=en
  3. YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIzp4EdbJVMhhSnq_0u4ntA
  4. Podcasts: https://www.spreaker.com/user/thearseniobuckshow, https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-arsenio-buck-show/id1181794790?mt=2, https://open.spotify.com/show/0x39CEN5tHvfRtfZaAMTgQ?si=8cpdu1rTTjKHogufXh91Cw
  5. Website: https://thearseniobuckshow.com/
  6. Twitter: https://twitter.com/arseniobuckshow?lang=en

The Future of Technology (1/2)

It’s already been 10 years since The Great Recession of 2008.  It caused a massive lay off and it just swept the world into global panic about the future, especially the young and ambitious millennials unable to get their first employment. However, it gave way to the unconventional financial services which emerged and are disrupting the traditional financial services like crowdfunding, P2P funding and Kickstarter.  Now millennials are able to invest their capital into meaningful projects, sparking a new trend of investment like a social investment.

According to the giant audit firm, PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC), they came up with a recent report showing what traditional financial services would need to keep up with the disruptions.  Kickstarter and Indiegogo already disrupted the traditional mortgage services and venture capitalists to invest in startups and other social enterprise projects as well as raising funds for your medical bills with Indiegogo.  By the year 2020, financial technology will be the future.

With the rise of the robo-adviser like Stashaway and Smartly, which allows its users to invest a small amount of money, you can expand your wealth and even build your investment and wealth portfolio based on the algorithms.  They are highly based on individual customisation which is the preference of the millennials and Generation Z. Those two financial technology firms are startups looking for their niche where most probably the millennials, who preferred cheaper, are in the higher income brackets based on the international survey by WEF. Also, the newly elected Malaysian government leverage the power of crowdfunding which was the P2P lending to allow millennials, or the ‘homeless generations,’ to purchase their first home. According to one Senior Vice President of J.P Morgan, he stated that the financial technology would eliminate a lot of manual work which is done by the teller clerks and the mortgage service processing clerks.

The most intriguing technology will be the blockchain. No one really knows about blockchain, which is the foundation of Bitcoin. When Satoshi published his white paper, his agenda was clear, to break off the monopoly of the centralised financial system at the Central Bank — the bank that allows rich and powerful CEOs to do as they want. 

The power of blockchain has gone up since the Bitcoin boom; and shortly after that, people wanted a piece of the pie, even the traditional banking system like J.P Morgan. They wanted to invest in blockchain just like Goldman Sachs also wanted to invest in blockchain and a platform for crypto trading where it was enough to crash the Bitcoin and other crypto prices. Luckily, that turned out to be a hoax.  Blockchain is a distributed ledger network and a decentralise network, however, bear in mind that not many distributed ledger technologies are built on ledgers or blocks like blockchain is. 

Cryptoassets: Season 3: Episode 7 – The Birth of Altcoins

Guys! It’s been a long time since doing one of these, and it’s probably because I fell a bit out of the system.  However, I’m back and I’m giving you some information in terms of the other altcoins.  Lots of this information I came across was both interesting and head-scratching.

Within a couple of years of launching, it had become clear that bitcoin was the first fully decentralized cryptocurrency to gain significant adoption, but there were some aspects with which people were not fully satisfied.  For example, bitcoin’s 10-minute block time mean that, depending on when a consumer hit send, it could take up to ten minutes, sometimes more, for the transaction to be appended to Bitcoin’s blockchain.

The delays happened because of the merchant and consumers.  However, it got better as time progressed.

Bitcoin’s first darling…Namecoin

This was the first of its kind.  However, it was more about utilizing blockchain than being a cryptocurrency. There’s really nothing else to say about this coin.

Litecoin

Litecoin was released in 2011 and still remains the one that retains its significant value to this day.  It was developed by Charlie Lee, a graduate from MIT out there in Boston, Mass, who was a software engineer at Google.

He launched it in 2011 of October and was an immediate hit because it was much faster than blockchain’s transaction times.

Ripple

This was created in 2004.  I had no idea that Crypto was created that far back, but Ryan Fugger, a web developer in Canada, worked on this project before Satoshi and Bitcoin.  Ripple also didn’t have miners, but instead had its own algorithm that relied on subnetworkers.  Let’s just say these algorithms were part of a larger decentralized network.  That’s all.

Dogecoin

It’s arrival was in 2013, and being that it was just a joke, Jackson Palmer bought the domain named dogecoin.com and then he got the attention of a lot of people.   After it’s launch, it’s network grew to 70 million in only seven weeks.  Shortly after, it dipped below 20 million.

Dash

Dash, and it’s developer, Evan Duffield, got off to a rocky start.  The coins went on a significant surplus and the reliability had become bleak because the developer not focusing 100% of his attention on dash.

Zcash

Zcash was another cryptocurrency that had a lot of promise.  It reached $1k per coin rather quickly.  At one point, the value peaked at 1 zcash for 3,299 bitcoin, or 2$ million dollars at the time.  You can only imagine what WOULD’VE happened.

After the hysteria, Zcash calmed down and traded between a cool $40-50 bucks per share.

By the end of 2016, the price of bitcoin had reached a level just below $1,000 USD, and there were over 800 cryptoassets in a market that totaled over $17 billion.  At the time, the top assets in order of network value were: Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple, Litecoin, Monero, Ethereum, Classic, and Dash

The innovative investor may note from the list that Ethereum follows Bitcoin.

Podcast

Cryptoassets: Season 3: Episode 6 – Digicash & The Miracle of Bitcoin

Why Crypto

Sometimes the word crypto makes people shudder, perhaps because they associate it with illicit activity, but that’s a mental bias that is important to overcome.  Crypto is simply a tip of the hat and a shortening of the key technology underlying these systems: cryptography.  As discussed, it’s the science of securely transmitting data so that only intended recipients can make use of it.  Cryptography is used to ensure that cryptoassets are transferred to the intended recipients securely.  Given our digital world and the increasing prevalence of hacks, the secure transmission of resources is paramount, and cryptoassets have such security in spades.

As I’ve said before, there are lots of things that need to happen before crypto, in general, goes to the next level.  Hackers are going to have to be neutralized at some point in order for this to really work.

The Story of David Chaum

Does anyone remember DigiCash’s ecash? Well, basically in the mid-90’s, David Chaum founded a digital payment system called Digicash.  He was a technical genius, but lacked all other skills in terms of personal development (thus why I tell everyone that they better start learning ASAP). Bill Gates, who I’m not particularly fond of, came to him with a 100 million dollar offer — he turned it down.  Netscape also wanted to know about it, but they didn’t like Chaum’s attitude at all.  In 1996, Visa wanted to invest $40 million into the company but Chaum wanted 75 million.

This was the fall of Digicash and they went bankrupt in 1998.  If not, ecash would have been integrated into all browsers and we wouldn’t have to make online payments with credit cards.

Amazing what happens when greed, selfishness, and a rotten personality (and romanticism over an idea) can do to your business and potentiality.

The Miracle of Bitcoin

So, the miracle of bitcoin is remarkable.  We know that.  We know that we can’t see it, touch it, or smell it, which is interesting because I’m still trying to figure out how miners actually work (and will in the later chapters). Paper currency has its value because it’s literally agreed upon.  Every member in society has agreed that this sheet of paper means money.  That’s why it’s famous.

When bitcoin launched, however, it had zero value.  The supporters valued bitcoin, though, and then it became big.

What does this mean? The power of it all lies in the hands of the people, and I truly think it’s unbelievably remarkable!

Podcast

Cryptoassets: Season 3 – Episode 3 – The Birth of Bitcoin

Financial markets, as said in my last post, took the heaviest losses in United States History.  However, somewhere in the world was this many Satoshi formalizing what’s going to take the world by storm.

A day after publishing that white paper, Satoshi sent an email called “The Cryptography Mailing List”.

He later wrote: “you will not find a solution to political problems in cryptography….but we can win a major battle in the arms race and gain a new territory of freedom for several years.  Governments are good at cutting off heads of centrally controlled networks like Napster, but pure P2P networks like Gnutella and Tor seem to be holding their own.” – Satoshi

On the 9th of November in 2008, Bitcoin project was registered on SourceForge.net. Wall Street continued crumbling, Satoshi laid-low, and then nine days after that, the first ever transaction using bitcoin took place.

Fact: A dollar investment in Bitcoin in 2008 would’ve been worth around 1 million dollars at the end of 2017.

What I find so unbelievably fascinating about all of this is while the US government was injecting trillions into the system to fight off the significant deaths and greed of wall street, Bitcoin’s birth cost NOTHING.

Since Satoshi disappeared, Bitcoin has unleashed a tidal wave of disruption and rethinking of global financial and technological systems.  Countless derivations of Bitcoin have been created — systems such as Ethereum, Litecoin, Monero, and Zcash — all of which rely on blockchain technology, Satoshi’s gift to the world.  At the same time, many financial and technological incumbents have moved to embrace the technology, creating confusing around all the innovation unfolding and what is most relevant to the innovative investor.  – Author

And now it’s time to talk about the lower case b and upper case B.

  • Bitcoin equals software.
  • bitcoin equals currency.

The author of this book emphasized that to truly understand Bitcoin, one has to move beyond the thinking that the media has pressed upon their consciousness in terms of being a currency/software for criminals.

If we look at history, the majority of wars were funded by “physical” currency, so if Bitcoin/bitcoin is bad because it’s used on illegal markets, we should possibly do away with ALL CURRENCY.

Over 100 media articles have jumped the opportunity to declare bitcoin dead, and each time they have been proven wrong.

To jump just a little off topic, remember those tools on wallstreet before the great crisis of 2008 saying that “Tesla is a cold stock!”  Yeah, proven wrong.  Bitcoin allows transactions to be settled in an hour as opposed to a couple of days.

Let me give you another example.  Transferwise, which was launched maybe in the last couple of years, has overtaken Paypal.  Honestly, I should be able to transfer money from my KTB account to my friend’s B of A account in America in an hour.  However, those middlemen, who Gary Vee has talked about for so long, always gets a piece of the pie. Bitcoin and blockchain will take all of that away, and this is why so many services are terrified and shaking in their boots because it could mean the end of them.

Bitcoin has something arguably more impressive than uber, Airbnb, and LendingClub to be a multibillion-dollar companies in their own realms.  Bitcoin let’s anyone be their own bank. – Chris Burniske

Listen to “Cryptoassets: Season 3 – Episode 3 – The Birth of Bitcoin” on Spreaker.

The Failure of Credentials (part 1/2)

Last year, my friend bought me a book that captured my attention about Malaysian youth unemployment that was higher than our Southeast Asian neighbours. Here the question popped up, ‘why Malaysian millennials like me can’t secure employment with a better pay cheque and move up the corporate ladder?’ and ‘did it have something to do with our flawed education system and higher education institutions that only produced unemployable fresh graduates that aren’t competitive with unmarketable skill sets?’ After all, youth unemployment was a problem back in the early 90s that coincided with the Age of Information! It just kept me wondering back then when I was in upper primary, secondary and college days as I always heard these words being whispered” “nowadays, college/university students can’t secure good jobs with good pay cheques.”

As the world economy makes the transition to a new type of economy; the higher education system, which is still built on an archaic model that required students to work in factories, has never gone through a radical reform except for the curricula of schools on school white paper. Here is the catch, it explained why youth unemployment is a real problem for policymakers at the same time they managed successfully to experiment on alternative education, which was student-centric. What is did was put emphasis on hands-on learning by getting students to work on projects. These students had higher chances of getting employment!

The book that I read was ‘The End of Jobs’ by Taylor Pearson. He was invited to give a talk  about his book ‘The End of Jobs’. In his book, he argued that with the internet, you can build a product’s prototype by hiring freelancers from the marketplaces like Upwork, Freelancer, Fiverr and Guru. Also, you can buy products by sourcing them from AliBaba, a marketplace for suppliers or manufacturers. He even went on further to propose about the educational credential had its own intrinsic value as he had drawn up two scenarios of two graduates who were employed where the other one went on a different route because of he or she was pissed off about the traditional 9 to 5 by becoming a lifestyle entrepreneur just like Taylor Pearson, himself, who took that kind of route. It sounds familiar among the modern day fresh graduate to have the call of the wild.

Taylor Pearson proposed that the economy is undergoing a transition from jobs to an entrepreneurial economy just like hundreds of years ago where society in the past used went through many transitions of the economy.  Later, with the success of the Gutenberg press that distributed the printing of the Bible into mass circulation that led to the printing of knowledge to be distributed massively to the people in Europe. Here, another transition from powerful royalty and aristocrats into the rule of the people due to a distributed knowledge that has already been through the power of printing.