Interviewee #20 – Perry Power – The Art of Storytelling

With a history of sexual abuse and losing his father just over a year ago, Perry has managed to use these dark times and turn it into lightness in order to inspire others to do the same. Believing that our ‘mess is our message’, Perry walks us through how we each have a unique story and hidden power, which we need to find in order to become the best version of ourselves.

Get in touch with Perry Power of the UK

– About the art of storytelling.

 

Links:

 

Things we discussed:

  • Introduction by Perry Power.
  • How Perry started it all?
  • Sharing about Perry’s childhood.
  • Deciding to talk about sexual abuse.
  • Sharing about dark times in an individual’s life.
  • Talking about a man’s ego.
  • Sharing your grief.
  • Talking about struggles in life.
  • The power of being vulnerable.
  • Talking about anger.
  • Sharing about how to shift a mindset about being yourself.
  • Talked about his first FB video.
  • The power of sharing.
  • The power of storytelling.
  • How you tell your story.
  • How old were you when you first started personal development?
  • What did personal development teach you?
  • Hate and forgiveness.
  • Talking about your history of sexual abuse.
  • You need some chapters to your storytelling.
  • The defining moment in your life and in your storytelling.
  • Perfecting your storytelling.
  • You need a flow like a slide in your storytelling.
  • What do you want to accomplish and what are you building?

 

 

Thank you for listening!

 

Thank you so much for joining me for this podcast. Please do write down some feedbacks and comments. Please do share this podcast on your social media.

 

Links:

 

How To Become A Good Conversationalist: Part II – Conversation Gambits

Things being discussed:

  • How to become a conversationalist? What is a gambit?
  • How to strike up a conversation?
  • Different ways of identifying a gambit.
  • You need to be profound.
  • Looking for ways to strike an initiative.
  • You need to be observant of people’s actions.
  • Living in a different country is a way to become a conversationalist.
  • Don’t lie and exploit the gambit.
  • Some gambits can’t be a topic of conversation.
  • What are bad gambits?
  • Don’t talk about personal life.
  • There are a lot of situations and interesting gambits for you to dig into.
  • Cut the conversation if people don’t feel comfortable.
  • Be an excellent listener.

 

Thank you for listening!

 

Thank you so much for joining me for this podcast. Please do write down some feedbacks and comments. Please do share this podcast to your social media.

 

Links:

https://www.spreaker.com/user/thearseniobuckshow/how-to-become-a-good-conversationalist-p

Jack Canfield – Have A Heart Talk

“Most communication resembles a Ping-Pong game in which people are merely preparing to slam their next point across; but pausing to understand differing points of view and associated feelings can turn apparent opponents into true member of the same team.” – Cliff Durfee

Jack Canfield said in his book, “unfortunately, in too many business, educational, and other settings, there is never an opportunity for feelings to be expressed and hear, so they build up to the point that people have no capacity to focus on the business at hand.”

This happened at a number of places I work in the past.  A group of people sitting in a group pointing fingers and not taking the blame.  No solutions.  Not everyone got to talk.  Just a lot of arguing and crying.

People just can’t listen until they have been heard. So, I thought making a podcast and describing in detail what a “heart talk” is could help you in your personal lives.

A Heart Talk is a structured communication process in which eight agreements are strictly adhered. It creates a safe environment for communication to occur – without the fear of interruption or being rushed.  It’s also great to release suppressed emotions that could otherwise get in the way of business.

When To Use It

  • Before or during a staff meeting.
  • At the beginning of a business meeting where two new groups of people are coming together for the first time.
  • After an emotionally stimulating event like a merger, a massive layoff, a death, a major athletic loss, or even the terrorist attacks of 9/11.
  • Regular basis at home, office or classroom.

How To Conduct

  1. Size of group between 2-10 people (I think 10 is a bit large).
  2. Example the value
  3. 15-30 minutes per person.

Guidelines

  • Only the person holding “the heart” is allowed to talk
  • You don’t judge or criticise what anyone else has said.
  • You pass the heart/object to the left after you turn, or say “I pass” if you have nothing to say.
  • You talk only about how you feel.
  • You keep the information that is shared confidential.
  • You don’t leave the Heart Talk until it’s declared complete.

Result From A Heart Talk

  • Enhanced listening skills
  • Constructive expression of feelings
  • Improved conflict resolution skills
  • Improved abilities to let go of resentments and old issues
  • Development of mutual respect and understanding
  • Greater sense of connection, unity, and bonding.

Podcast – https://www.spreaker.com/episode/9331130

Jack Canfield – Create A Network Of Mentors And Others Who Will Up-Level You

“Study anyone who’s great, and you’ll find that they apprenticed to a master, or several masters.  Therefore, if you want to achieve greatness, renown, and superlative success, you must apprentice to a master.” – Robert Allen

Success leaves clues.  Why not take advantage of all the wisdom and experience that already exists by finding a mentor who has already done what you want to do? Just ask!

Determine in advance what you want from this mentor.  Les Brown, for instance, would help you see possibilities.  In other words, mentors help you overcome “possibility blindness.”

Maybe you just need someone to open doors for you. Or perhaps you need a referral to a technical expert.  Whatever it may be, these particular individuals/mentors will allow you to see the bread crumbs in life that most of us miss throughout our daily lives.

Do Your Homework

Do your research on the names and backgrounds of people. I’ve given a list of names a number of times for you to look up who you like the most. The people who have been successful in the industry you’re trying to enter.

There’s an excerpt in Jack Canfield’s book that plays the role of a specific individual asking someone for help – ultimately getting help from the mentor and ended up expanding his company exponentially.

Hello, Mr. Johnston, my name is Neil. We haven’t met yet.  And I know you’re a busy man, so I’ll be brief.  I own a small trucking business.  Over the years, you have done a fantastic job building your business into one of the largest companies in our industry.  I’m sure you had some real challenges when you were first starting out.  Well, I’m still in those early stages, trying to figure everything out. Mr. Johnston, I would really appreciate it if you would consider being my mentor.  All that would mean is spending ten minutes on the phone with me once a month, so I could ask you a few questions. I’d really appreciate it.  Would you be open to that?

Not too hard, right?

You also better be prepared to give your mentors something in return.  Even if it’s something simple such as keeping them updated on industry information or calling with new opportunities that might benefit them.

Network Your Way To Success

Generating referrals and increased business – normally the referrals you get from networking are high quality. You can ultimately turn these people into clients over time.

Expanding opportunities – getting together with motivated business owners could lead to a joint venture, partnership, speaking and writing opportunities, business or asset sales, investment opportunities and so much more.

Networking is all about relationships – If you’re attending networking events hoping to sell something, you’re dreaming.  Don’t confuse direct selling with networking.  Effective networking is all about developing relationships. Networking is more about farming, not hurting. Development with other business professionals.  Sometimes you’ll want to go to a networking event just to increase your visibility, establish credibility, etc.