Lewis Howes’ Masks of Masculinity Book Review: Stoic & Athlete Mask – Episode 3

I decided to break these down in increments of two (1/4) because I feel it would me too much material to handle in one go.  So, here’s a breakdown of the STOIC and Athlete masks.

The STOIC mask somewhat relates to the Alpha Mask in a way that men AREN’T SUPPOSED to show their emotions.  Every man dreams of being the hero, but the amount of pain that lies within him, is killing him — literally.

There was a substitute teacher I had back in the 6th grade that told us a story about her brother.  With every hardship, he stayed quiet.  He didn’t want to express his feelings, because apparently that would make him less of a man.  One day he had a heart attack, dying right before his family.  She went on the ask us, “why do you think he died?”  We, of course at a very young age, were scratching our heads.  The reason for the heart attack was because he held all those feelings of greed, grief, hate, and all other negative feelings with him; rather than having someone on the receiving end, listen.

What Can You Do?

A weight off your shoulders
Deeper relationships with men and women
Healing
A healthy heart
Vulnerability
The permission to feel
Acceptance and belonging

Step 1: Make a list of the five most painful moments of your life. Note what happened, and how you felt in each moment. Journal about it and go into detail. (An example could be: My dad was my best friend growing up, but he abandoned me when I was 6, and it left me devastated.)
Step 2: Once you’ve journaled about these painful moments, read them out loud to yourself. Give yourself permission to feel or to cry about them when you hear your own words. Play soft instrumental music during this process to facilitate your ability to reach your emotions as you allow your feelings to awaken.

Step 3: Share them. When you have accepted the truth of this pain and all these emotions, tell a friend, partner, or family member whom you trust. Part of removing the Stoic Mask is allowing other people to support you. The only way they can do that is if they know what’s going on. I’m a big believer that anyone who has experienced trauma in their past (and hasn’t ever discussed it with someone) will allow the trauma to grow in negative ways. You won’t be able to heal until you begin to share your story.
Step 4: Look into hiring a coach, therapist, or someone who is a specialist. Once you’ve shared your pain, you need to find someone who has experience with helping people understand their emotions and get comfortable with them. For those who really struggle behind the Stoic Mask, this is serious work and it requires a serious approach. But it is work that can start today, right now, with a piece of paper and a pencil.”

Excerpt From: Lewis Howes. “The Mask of Masculinity.” iBooks.

Athlete Masks

From the Tommy Hearns and Marvin Hagler, to the battles of NFL players trying to prove rights over others by delivering the most vicious, bone-crushing hits.

“Gilbert Arenas, the ultra-talented point guard for the Golden State Warriors and Washington Wizards? Not only was he a prolific scorer and a back-to-back-to-back NBA All-Star who led the entire league in minutes played during the 2005–06 season, but he and his Wizards teammate Javaris Crittenton threatened each other with handguns in the team locker room. Is that what men do? Threaten each other with dangerous weapons over a $1,100 gambling debt? This move cost Arenas $7.5 million in salary. Crittenton is currently serving a 23-year prison sentence on an unrelated 2015 manslaughter charge.”

Excerpt From: Lewis Howes. “The Mask of Masculinity.” iBooks.

“Think about all the incredible athletes out there whose prowess on the field doesn’t line up with the way they conduct their personal lives. Take Antonio Cromartie, a four-time Pro Bowler who led the entire NFL in interceptions in 2007 and holds the record for the longest play in NFL history. He is mind-bogglingly talented. But you forget all of that when you watch him in a 2010 episode of HBO’s Hard Knocks, a sports documentary series, where he struggles to remember and recite the names of his eight children (from seven mothers), three of whom are the same age. Cromartie now has 10 children with twins on the way, and reportedly pays close to $340,000 a year in child support.” – Lewis Howes

So, you can see these two masks are what 95% of men in the world suffer from.  Let’s take them off once and for all!

What can you do now?

Five core areas…

1.Health: mental, physical, emotional
2.Relationships: intimate, family, friends
3.Wealth: finances, career, education, business
4.Contribution: making an impact in the world and other people’s lives, being of service
5.Spiritual: connecting to a higher power or your spiritual beliefs”

Podcast

Interviewee #17 – AJ’s Fitness Journey & Entrepreneurship

First time I met this man, I was in awe.  The size of him was unlike anything I had ever seen in my life.  If I can compare him to Evander Holyfield, one of America’s famous boxers, he’s a bit close.  Nonetheless, after chatting it up with him and hearing/seeing his charisma + his story, I decided to bring him on the show.

AJ is an NSCA Certified Personal Trainer and Strength and Conditioning coach.

​AJ’s athletic background and his ongoing curiosity to the latest nutrition and exercise research fuels his passion to assist and educate individuals in fulfilling any fitness and wellness goals. AJ strongly believes in taking a multi-dimensional approach towards optimal health and works with his clients to find ways to incorporate it in their lifestyles.

Get in touch with AJ of Bangkok, Thailand

– About fitness training, personal training and coaching.

Links:

 

Things we discussed:

  • Introduction about himself.
  • How long has AJ been in Bangkok.
  • How he started his work for the Lab and how long he’s been working for the Lab?
  • Discussing about the beginning of his fitness journey.
  • How he ended up in ESPN as a boxer.
  • How he ended up in the national championship.
  • Decision to become a personal trainer in boxing.
  • When the last time he fought in a boxing match.
  • How he ended up in other fields like engineering, teaching Mathematics, being  an online teacher, and digital nomading by travelling to Europe, India and Asia?
  • Your advice on about being a digital nomad or location – independent entrepreneurs.
  • Advise to people about being digital nomads or location – independent.
  • You need to be dedication in your work or side hustling by investing yourself.
  • Find something that is helping you and others. Think big and dare to dream.
  • Why the interviewee ended up in Thailand.
  • Applying teaching jobs from Thailand, South Korea and China.
  • When did you decide to become a fitness trainer?
  • How he branded himself as a fitness trainer?
  • Why the most fit is considered unhealthy?
  • How do you approach your fitness and your health?
  • Talking about mindfulness and personal development.
  • Talking about diets.
  • Be attentive to what and how you are doing with your body and your fitness.
  • Make the wholesome food as your priority in your health and diet.
  • You need to have quality diets between farm raised meat and plant based.
  • Your opinions on about keto-diet from a personal trainer.
  • Do your research about certain diets and lifestyles before you make a decision on which to follow.
  • Marketing about AJ’s personal branding.
  • Balance all in mindfulness, relationships, health and personal development, that’s what it’s all about being healthy.
  • What is the interviewee’s inspiration?
  • What is the interviewee’s outlook from 2 years from now?
  • What is the most difficult workout?
  • What is the number one condition for fat burning?

 

Thank you for listening!

 

Thank you so much for joining me for this podcast. Please do write down some feedbacks and comments. Please do share this podcast to your social media.

 

Links:

Aggressive Mask: Part IV – What Can We Do Right Now?

“In the middle of my conversation with Ray Lewis, I asked him about his definition of a man and whether it had evolved as he got older, had kids, became successful, and ultimately retired. By way of answering my question, he told me a story about when he came to a deeper understanding of the challenges the men in his family have faced.

He was 33 years old. He’d reengaged with his long-absent father, and his father wanted him to meet a man named Shady Ray Whitehead who lived in some little trailer 6 hours outside of Charlotte, North Carolina. He had no idea where they were going or who this man was they were visiting, but when they arrived, he and his father walked in and his father said, “Meet your grandfather.”

Ray sat on the floor while his dad sat on the couch, and they talked. One of the first things out of his father’s mouth was a question to his grandfather that had also run through Ray’s head nearly every day of the first 17 years of his life: “Dad, why’d you leave me?” To say this blindsided Ray would be an understatement.

“Ray sat with this information for a while, listening to his father and grandfather, and started to think about the men in his family who struggled in their relationships. Ray’s realization is something out of a novel, or a sermon:

This is a generational curse, man. My son is 21, I’m 41, my father is 61, my grandfather’s 81. His father is 101. Five generations. Twenty years apart. What are we doing? I rode back home with my father for 6 hours while he kept talking, and I never said a word. When I got done listening to him, I said to him: “You know what a man is? A man accepts all of the wrongs, never complains, forgives, and then moves on.” That’s what a man does, because you can never replace him not being at a football game. Never replace him not being to a wrestling match, or a track meet. Beat up by a group of kids? You can never replace him not being there. You can never replace that. So what you can replace is you can replace it with moving on.”

“This is our work to do. The rewards are, indeed, waiting for us, but they will not make themselves known until we begin the process of dropping our Aggressive Mask.”

Replace it with moving on.  It’s time to top off the chapter with my own story.

My father, in 1999, dropped my brother, my sisters, and I off at a doorstep of a house before driving away.  He said, “knock on the door and ask for your mother.”  We did, and he sped off, not seeing him again for the ensuing months.  It was odd, me being only 11 years old and living in more than 5 different households over a year span.

In 2000, I saw someone walking down the street and said, “that looks like my dad!”  Minutes later, I went back home and I was right.  It was my father….and him being in the same household as my mother, went nuts.  Not necessarily on his end, but my mother bursts into anger anytime she hears the name “Willie.”  He wanted “in” our lives, and so my mother granted that if we wanted it.

I remember he was on the phone and I was suppose to go to him that weekend.  I said, “dad, do you have the video games?”  What sounded like video games weren’t, but my father was a master at lying.  After naming three videos games, the third one being my favorite, I bursted into tears of joy before going upstairs to tell my mom.  My mother eavesdropped on the conversation because you could do that by picking up the other line 18 years ago.  I told her what my father got and she said, “he didn’t get you those games. He’s lying.”

I said, “you never did anything for us.”

She cried.

I felt absolutely wretched….even more wretched because she was telling the truth.  My dad was a liar from day 1 and I never knew it until of course that day.  I remember seeing him maybe late 2000 after he came over.  After that, I never saw him again, only hearing his voice on a bus in 2007 and looking square into his eyes in another incident (on the bus) one year later.

I’m blaming him for being the amazing man I am today.

“A man who struggles with aggression needs, first and foremost, to channel his energy and anger in a constructive direction. There are a number of ways to do this at a practical level:
▸Create a wrecking room in your house where you can get it out safely. Fill it with things to smash, push, hit, and pummel. If you can’t get a room, get a pillow. Beat the hell out of it. And repeat.
▸Do cathartic shouting exercises once a week. Scream it out!
▸Take a boxing class, work out, swim, or run.
▸Create an affirmation (e.g., “I’m a peaceful, joyful, loving man”) that you say when you want to break something or get aggressive. – Lewis Howes

Podcast

 

Aggressive Mask: Part II

“Unaddressed anger is the glue that keeps the Aggressive Mask stuck in place, starting very early and lasting, in many cases, for decades. There is research on this, and it testifies to how much young boys, in particular, are soaked in anger. For many of them, anger is the only emotion that is “acceptable” to express.” – Lewis Howes

Blueprints, right? I mean anger is taught.  No way in hell it’s genetics…thats just the genetic make-up of a human being.  Men develop an insurmountable amount of anger over years – I’m one of them.  I’m not sure when it started developing, but late 2003 – 2004, I was enraged.  When I played video games, I would cry when I lost because I thought the game was “cheating.”  My mom would scream at me and tell me to stop playing the game.  Of course this is a story I told in my podcast before, but this is the aggression and crazy amount of anger that I suffered from during my sophomore year of high school.

It wasn’t until I joined Track and Field when it changed.  Again, if I had joined football, I would’ve been talked about in this part of Lewis Howes book.

Ashley Burch, who’s a writer said “when an emotion sneaks in for a male character [in video games], by and large, it is anger. And any sort of grief is very, very underplayed and never actually discussed or processed. Kids end up really looking up to this character. And what they end up idolizing is someone who cannot express themselves emotionally, cannot be honest or open with anyone around them.”

I’ve had the privilege of not having such a tumultuous childhood involving physical abuse both inside and outside the home.  However, I must tell a story that no one actually knows about.

Back in 1997, my father took full custody from my mother and we hopped from one side of Las Vegas to another.  During that time, his second girlfriend, named Kim, had a song and daughter named Brandon and Emily.  This was a family of three from Missouri (a small town in the middle of nowhere).  I didn’t make anything of the pair initially, but then things started happening.  I can’t remember exactly where, but let’s just say it was in the second apartment we lived in.  Brandon would shout, “n*****” at me.  When this happened, I would beat the bricks out of him (lol – but it’s funny – a little).  He would come up with blood coming from his nose and his mom would scream, “what happened to you?!”

“Arsenio punched me.”

I then said, “you called me a N*****!”

……crickets…..

The mother couldn’t defend her son for using such a degrading word.

These were the times when my brother wasn’t around because of his constant anger issues, which he probably got from my mother at the time because of all household issues.  So, I would have to fight my way.  I was bullied a couple days until I retaliated the 3rd day.  This was the day, and only day when I hit another human bring outside of sibling rivalries.  The bully, by the name of Richard, was shoving me forward and backward — and out of impulse — I swung my arm right across the top of his nose, breaking it.

That was 1998.  Fast-forward it to 2001, my friend Billy, who’s still my best friend today, came to a huge disagreement while playing basketball.  In the moment, he began flailing his arms at my face.  I stepped back a few times and grabbed his shirt, swinging him all over the floor before his mother came out and yelled, “I’m gonna kick yal’s asses!”

How did I remain composed? Billy, who would constantly call me poor over the course of a year, deserved a pair of hands to be laid upon his face.  I never had the courage to do it.  Maybe because when I was younger, I saw my mother and father put knives in each other’s faces.  I was never a violent individual – even going back to the Brandon days.

On the other hand and with great respect, I feel my brother wasn’t the lucky one.  I truly believe that my brother ended up getting a piece of the “90’s” mother and father in him.  I recently talked to my sister and she says they never speak to him because he’s always angry.  He’s demanding.  Everything is always right to him….and this is why the relationship between him and I sailed a long time ago.  That anger has lead to destructive habits which he engages in everyday.  The fact that I believe he’s a compulsive gambler, betting on superficial sports games to make ends meet, is a very valid point.  When “little brother” tries inviting him into another world, he becomes angry, gets defensive, combative, and belligerent.

I played sports (Track & Field); but my brother, on the other hand, never played sports.  Could this be the reason why there’s a lot of animosity?

Podcast

https://www.spreaker.com/user/thearseniobuckshow/aggressive-mask-part-ii-stories-from-chi

Lewis Howes: Aggressive Mask – Introduction

Imagine the moments before a fight.  One of the biggest fights that I’ve ever watched had to be Tito Trinidad vs. Ricardo Mayorga.  This was big on so many levels because it was the Puerto Ricans versus the Nicaraguans.  At one point in one of the rounds, Ricardo Mayorga began taunting Trinidad and there was an uproar in the house, people literally screaming at the television.  At the specific moment I couldn’t hear a word that was being said by my friend and he was standing six inches from me.

Fast-forwarding to a fight when Miguel Cotto got pummelled by Antonio Margarito.  I remember seeing the state of Miguel’s face and wondered, “how does he look that bad?”  Later, Margarito’s trainer was seen by Shane Mosley’s camp — putting plaster into the gloves of Antonio.  If you guys don’t know the horrific story of Billy Collins, this is exactly what probably took place during the Miguel Cotto fight.  Plaster, after being consumed and inundated with sweat, begins to harden.  Miguel said during the fight, “he got stronger as the rounds went on.”  There’s no real evidence, but we all know the truth.

That was from 2004, to 2008, and then after seeing interviews by boxing greats such as Evander Holyfield, Riddick Bowe, Thomas Hearns….I couldn’t understand a word that was being said from their mouths.  Why? They lost more than 50% of their speaking capabilities because the constant blows to the head.

So after seeing everything take place the way it did over decades of being a boxing fan, I no longer supported the sport.  Human beings literally raging in the stands, shouting, cheering on an assault between two men or two women.

Welcome to the aggressive mask.

Andy Cona, who’s a British cage fighter, said this…

“The first fight I ever had was like a release. Like, “I’m allowed to hit this lad, and it’s making me feel better.” See, I don’t have a family. Me and my brother were put into [foster] homes. He was everything—he was my mom, my dad, my brother, and my sister. He was everyone, and then he killed himself. I’ve never, ever told anyone that. I don’t like to show people weakness. I’m broken inside, I know I am.”

Lewis Howes went on to say, “but still, there’s something scary about taking years of childhood issues and pain and channeling them outward at a total stranger for money and fame. As Andy’s story reveals, for the most part, the pain you inflict on others never reduces the pain you are trying to escape from within yourself.”

If you look at the majority of athletes, especially in America, they’re all inner-city kids.  Mike Tyson had a horrendous childhood and be brought along a lot of those problems outside the ring, becoming a very polarizing character in the 1990’s.

Thai prison systems, which are very controversial, has inmates practice Muay Thai and fight – fighters outside the prison yard.

What is it with aggressiveness and pouring on all your childhood pain, mistakes, and suffering onto another individual rather than honing into 100%?  Sure, no one asked to be molested.  I didn’t deserve to be dropped at a doorstep myself in 1999…however, it happened.  Did I make that my story to why I’m such a “f*** up?” No.

Ray Lewis, who had upbringings beyond comprehension, is the greatest linebacker to ever play the position in the NFL.  Fierce, ferocious, tenacity, inspirational, hungry, and just a demon on the field……he was able to unleash his childhood tribulations into wrestling first (in high school), then onto the football field.  His mother was abused for a long time by her bf….and Ray Lewis asked, “mom, you have two black eyes! Let’s go!”

She said, “no.  He’s our only means of financial stability. We can’t leave.”

Ray Lewis used a deck of cards to relieve himself of so much pain by doing pushups.  1-10; jacks, queens and kings are ten; ace 11; and jokers were I think 11-21.  I’m not sure what the exact number is, but I’m sure he did over 300 pushups.

At 41, he said this in Lewis Howes podcast interview.

“There are certain moments in a child’s life that a father should never miss because when you replace [that influence], most of the time you replace it with things that get you in trouble. I replaced it with dominance over another individual. I had hate for my father, and that hate turned into fuel. I don’t encourage anybody to live the way I lived.” – Ray Lewis

It’s like young men don’t have an outlet to their anxiety, anger or other things.  I saw the students, when I was a student, sit in class and stay quiet while they were getting bullied by other aggressive kids.  Then the shooting massacre in Colorado happened in 1999.  I was listening to Gary Vee yesterday and he was saying that poor parenting results in bullies and children being bullied.  Why do children have this aggressiveness that generates into an Alpha Mask.  Stories of Ariece, P’Allen, and Marcos (childhood classmates) will be in my podcast down below! Time to welcome in this introduction!

Podcast

Circle of Concern vs. Circle of Influence: Friendship Woes

It’s been a very turbulent year — people (what I would call friends in the past) coming and going.  Some of this could be unbearable for most, but I built up a fortified wall in front of my feelings, telling myself that all of these so-called “friends” are here to fulfill a purpose.  Remember what I said a long time ago: life-time, life-giving, and purposeful relationships.  People are categorized into these three areas.

Best Friends Turned Enemy

I don’t believe it was so much her getting a boyfriend, but me having a life-changing experience happen on the other end just 3 weeks after.  My life went from almost investing and staying in Thailand long-term, to almost booking a trip to Honduras or Costa Rica after a racially implicit event in my workplace and was expunged from teaching at a company.  Yes, if she was my best friend Andre, we would be able to talk it out, make amends, and just move on with our friendship.  With her there was possible miscommunication, but I also saw danger — danger that could’ve bloomed if I had gone to America.  So, I cancelled the trip, and three weeks later my job was on the line.  My hands were incredulously on my head and I was being criticized by an individual who shouldn’t be criticizing anyone, given the circumstances of him being in Thailand.

Almost one month later, new condo, five job opportunities, six projects and so many other things….now I understand WHY I didn’t go to America.

Purposeful Relationship Turned Chaos

I met someone by the name of Zern who I thought had the same energy as I.  I seriously thought that she was me in a completely different form.  However, after two weeks, a nose-dive happened.  The energy between us changed and then the complaints were ON 100% (barely anything coming from my kisser).  This lead to her going out with a friend to one of the most notorious areas in all of Asia where drunk, poor backpackers go to have sex.  That was THE END. 

The Student That Couldn’t Take It

The last episode comes from an individual who I catapulted into the University of Sydney.  After completion of her Masters Degree, she came back (just recently) to Thailand.  Because I’m going through a very pivotal stage in my life, I need her to help me with translations from English-to-Thai.  Granted, I helped her with grammatical structures the past 1.5 years.  She helped me, and then I asked her for a very important favor.  Before I continue, she is a doctor.  Now, let’s get back into this…..I needed assistance taking some luggage and boxes to my new condo.

CRICKETS

After that message, she was gone!

Moral of these stories…..you’re the only person who can be rescue 911.

Podcast

https://www.spreaker.com/user/thearseniobuckshow/circle-of-concern-vs-circle-of-influence

Lewis Howes: The Athlete Mask

It was March 17th, 1990.  Meldrick Taylor, a prominent superstar welterweight vs. the furious Julio Caesar Chavez.

For at least 8 of the rounds, Meldrick Taylor was putting on a boxing clinic against the heavily favored Chavez.  However, in the latter rounds, Chavez blows started to take a toll, startling Meldrick Taylor with about 1:15 to go in the 12th round.  After a knockdown with 15 seconds left in the fight – followed by a controversial stoppage of the fight — Chavez won, but who really won the war at “life?”

Following the fight, Meldrick Taylor urinated blood – resulting in Kidney damage.  The fight was one for the ages and Taylor really never bounced-back and became the champion he once declared to the universe a year or so prior.  Instead, 10 years later, you can hardly understand a word he says.  He has a severe speech impediment, just like Tommy Hearns who went to war with the Marvelous Marvin Hagler in the 80’s.

Another notable trilogy was the Bowe vs. Holyfield – two massive beasts punching each other to near death over the course of 36 rounds and I can hardly understand a word they say, too.

What’s the paradox? Boxing fans around the world cheer on two men beating each other to death like it’s ancient Rome.

However, this is what it feels like to be a “man,” right? If you look at my picture, men aren’t suppose to show signs of defeat because then that makes you a “coward” in the world of sports.  To be a man, according to bodybuilders, is all about how much you can deadlift or bench.  If you can’t do either, you’re a ***sy.

Welcome to the Athlete Mask.

Podcast

Different Types of Cardio Routines Aside From The Treadmill

This morning I kicked off the day running and maneuvering through traffic while people going to work stood on the sidewalks completely exhausted by looking at me sweat.  These mornings make my day because I have the opportunity to do therapy without a therapist: laughing, rapping, singing, screaming….who’s judging?

Nevertheless, I get most of my energy from failure 12 years ago in Track & Field.  12 years on, I’m still pushing my body to the limit (with proper recovery, adequate massages, and great nutrition).

Now, there are bodybuilders who get bulky big to compete; on the other hand, there are lean machines that are adrenaline junkies, such as myself.  I’ve always loved running, let alone running FAST.  I do a combination of things to keep my body guessing so I decided to share with you what my cardio routines look like.

Battle Rope

418464-zoomI bought one of these mammoths a couple years ago, and on mornings I didn’t feel like going running, I brought this bad boy downstairs, tied it up to a light-post, and went to WORK!  People stared at me in disgust (given the fact I was staying in the slums and didn’t even know lol) and that’s when I began the rapping festivals like it was an Eminem concert.  During these times, I met one of my first ever friends in Rangsit who would run 8 miles every morning.  On top of that, the two of us will go compete in a Spartan competition in September outside of Bangkok.  THE LOVE!

Here’s a nice little video from YouTube on what type of exercises you can do with this.

 

PowerSled 

Power-Sled-Cropped-Main-Photo_1024x1024

This is the behemoth of them all, and I wouldn’t recommend this for any beginner because the severity of what could happen.  What could happen? Well, regurgitation is the number one thing.  You would also need to do this with a partner, too, so if you don’t have someone else, you’re on your own which could be problematic.  You literally stack some plates (a weight that’s good enough for you) right in the middle and push it 5-20 meters (depending on how brutal your workout is going to be).  This is a full-body workout, but it will target your legs BIG TIME!

Stair master 

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I don’t think I need to explain what this is.  I’m pretty distraught that they don’t have these in gyms out here in Thailand; however, America and Australia definitely have them.  This is my ALL-TIME favorite compared to the treadmill.

Box Jumps

Tip-Use-Box-Jumps-The-Right-Way

The goal to doing box jumps is to jump up and hold in the squat position.  It could wear and tear on your joints if you immediately jump off and jump back on.  Instead, jump on and hold for two seconds before jumping down and hold for two seconds.  You will feel it in the glutes after about 3-5 of them. Also, do a combination of burpees so you can get the full body workout in.

Agility Ladder 

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This could surely be a warm-up before going into box jumps.  Don’t do too many intervals because you can definitely feel it on the achilles.

Punching Bag

Punching

And here’s the last one.  I’ve never realized how much of a cardio workout the punching bag is.  Proper gloves and someone holding the bag for you makes for an intense 10-15 minute cardio workout.