Is Thailand Really As Bad As “They” Say? Or Is It The Foreigners Who Come Here With Bad Intentions?

There’s really no other way to explain what I just read by just showing you what I just read – all credit to Ajarn.com, the place where apparently “men” go to lose their feelings and talk about how bad life is here in Thailand.

As an African American, I’m completely appalled at the fact that so many people, of a completely favorable skin-tone, can complain about this country.  I mean, I was turned away at immigration and treated badly at the main dog house in the heart of Bangkok five years ago, I was looked down upon at the border crossing (Sadow) where a family before me went to the window and the lady gave them a proper “why”; however, when I approached the window, she gave me a disparaging look as if I was the worst drug-dealer on the face of planet Earth.  Does this happen to “anglos” here? Absolutely not.

I’m pointing out ethnicities simply because this is what I’ve talked about all long.  Those “whiny bitch parties.”

Without further ado, there’s a little entry thingy on this particular website called the “great escape.”  The man, who doesn’t even need to be mentioned, is the creator of this – telling Native English Speaking teachers who have left Thailand to write an entry on why they left.

This is one of those cases…..

I wasn’t qualified enough as a teacher and the ESL industry in Thailand doesn’t allow for any sort of nurturing or learning of teaching abilities, except in a really cruel and counter-productive manner to the actual idea of teaching.

The way Thailand immigration and work laws are set up simply doesn’t allow for any sort of real growth in teaching or for students learning ESL. I wish I had done my research better and I had more realistic expectations to start with, because it really didn’t end well.

The first job, I got sacked from a high rotation agency for little reason and extremely roughly in a way that went directly against the contract I signed.

Second job was for a school that was little more than a prison for rich boys with an unbelievably toxic bully culture – and they had no curriculum, exam papers or even textbooks. I resigned from that one.

Even the international school I applied for was super wrong. They couldn’t even arrange a demonstration class for me properly and got me to travel back and forth three times before they threw me into a science class to demonstrate an English class I had prepared. Of course I didn’t get the job and I now understand I was set up to look incompetent because they couldn’t be bothered to manage things right.

My self-esteem plummeted and I guess I must have “lost face” with my own partner, with whom I’d arranged to marry after the school year ended. I told her I didn’t believe I was qualified enough (to be honest I don’t think anyone is except for local teachers) to teach in Thailand. We couldn’t realistically keep the same date for marriage so I suggested postponing. She kicked me out – taking my bike and leaving me in a hotel with only what luggage I could carry (after a 3-year relationship).

It’s a terminal issue that goes way beyond me. I met other teachers who were either alcoholics drowning their issues into oblivion, losers, sex pests using the local women for their man-ventures, people running away from their own countries for whatever reason, ditzy backpackers or gap year folk looking for a working holiday (probably the best way to do things), actual teachers who were extremely bitter (for good reason), or good folk who were stuck in relationship quagmires like me. The long-termers all seemed stuck in a toxic situation and all seemed miserable.

I realised that I was contributing to a more ingrained pattern of a toxic education system that is highly budgeted but highly ineffective in teaching English.

I got burnout from teaching and got treated badly by immigration and country in record time, and then everything I had built just fell apart. That could have been a good thing because it could have gotten worse. I saved money from the dowry (for a relationship gone bust) and I have that to get me by back at home.

First of all, how could you rely on immigration to help you with your personal and professional development as a teacher? I mean that’s what “schools” are suppose to provide, right? I mean I’m working at a language center which has declined rapidly because they don’t have development curriculums and classes that teachers can take to improve their teaching capabilities in a particular subject.  This is all because the foreign coordinator — and has nothing to do with the Thai system, immigration, or Thai culture.

The second school he was at where he detailed, “no curriculum, no textbooks, no nothing” is a reasonable find, but I’ve been through those, too.  However, can I just back up the Thais on this one? How about China, Vietnam, Myanmar, Cambodia, Indonesia…etc….do they have the same problems? The Australians and British within Thailand always love comparing saying, “back home in England we have such an unbelievable system that prepares students – BLAH BLAH BLAH!” Yeah, and they also have men shoving Africans off subway trains while spewing racial rhetoric.  This “I’m from England; therefore, I’m the greatest man on the planet” nonsense has to stop.

Him losing self-esteem is not because of what he went through, but because he allowed it to happen.  I lost my self-esteem when Thai women shouted racial comments at me on social media.  However, I got it back by taking personal development into my own hands. When he told his partner this, I can tell almost immediately that she was a bargirl.  No girl would kick a man to the curb, take his stuff, and leave him at a hotel.  My guess is again, he was a 40-70-year-old man like I’ve told you about a many of times.

If your is in the wrong place, you’re going to lose the game.  Those foreigners that come here winning the 1st and 2nd quarters will end up losing the game.  I can assure you that.

Podcast

https://www.spreaker.com/user/thearseniobuckshow/is-thailand-really-as-bad-as-they-say-or

Goitre Thyroid: The Condition That Ravaged The North of Thailand & Foods You Can Put Into Your Diet That Contain Iodine.

So, after having a conversation with one of my students yesterday, I was left terrified – touching my neck to see if I have enlarged thyroid glands.

Years ago in the north of Thailand, the accessibility of salt was scarce.  Salt, for those of you who don’t know, contains iodine.  Have you ever went to the super market and found on shelves *Iodized Salt*?  That’s exactly what I’m here to tell you about.  This deficiency alone affects more than 2 billion people on the planet, scientists say.

Now, in America, this is uncommon dee to the readily available iodine in our diets.  However, in parts of Thailand dating back 20-30 years and still a bit common today….suffers heavily from this.

Goitre Thyroid

This is an enlargement of the thyroid.  A very grotesque looking condition that causes your thyroid to swell up into a small mass that’s the size of a mini soccer ball.  I won’t attach any photos because it makes me want to hurl.

Nonetheless, this condition is uncommon in some parts of the world, but I do want to give you some foods that contain iodine just incase you’re lacking it in your daily diet – and I’m not talking about just table spooning salt down your throat, either.

7 Foods That Contain Iodine

1. Sea Vegetables – Kelp

The ocean hosts the largest amount of iodine foods, including Kelp.  Kelp has the highest amount of iodine of any food on the planet and just one serving offers 4 times the daily minimum requirement. 1 tablespoon of Kelp contains about 2000/mcg of iodine.

I would recommend sprinkling these into soups or salad, even an avocado salad. 🙂

2. Cranberries

This antioxidant rich fruit is another great source of iodine. About 4 ounces of cranberries contain approximately 400/mcg of iodine. I recommend buying fresh organic berries or juice. If you buy cranberry juice from the store, be aware of how much sugar it contains. Obviously those cartons of juice in super markets have stacks upon stacks of sugar, so what could be a very antioxidant rich fruit can turn detrimental.

3. Organic Yogurt

A natural probiotic, yogurt is an excellent iodine food you should add to your diet. One serving holds more than half of your daily needs. 1 cup contains approximately 90/mcg of iodine. Other than yogurt, I will make a blog containing a bunch of probiotic foods that actually even promote your digestive system. Stay tuned!

4. Organic Navy Beans

Many beans are a great food source of iodine and navy beans may top the list. Just 1/2 cup of these beans contain about 32/mcg of iodine. Beans aren’t just an iodine food, they are also incredibly high in finer, which also supports the digestive system.  Navy beans are probably a rare commodity in the households of a lot of people around the world; however, I’m sure there are other beans that have a great source of iodine, too.

5. Organic Strawberries

This tasty red fruit packs up to 10% of your daily iodine needs in just a single serving. One cup of fresh strawberries has approximately 13/mcg of iodine. It’s hard to tell what’s organic and inorganic nowadays, but fresh food markets and places where the prices are normally jacked up houses organic foods.  I know, it’s sad that there are organic food shops which are far more expensive than inorganic food that are full of chemicals.

6. Raw, Organic Cheese

CHEESE! Cheese is high in iodine, along with essential B vitamins, calcium, and protein. Dairy, whether raw or pasteurized, may not be the best choice for some people, especially those with sensitive digestive systems.  Also, most cheese is loaded with sodium, so be aware of what type of cheese you’re buying! I’ll probably have to do a blog on cheese just to steer some of my readers in the right direction.

7. Organic Potatoes

The common potato is an easy addition to most meals and is one of the richest sources of iodine in the vegetable kingdom. Leave the skin on and one medium-sized baked potato holds 60/mcg of iodine. Be sure to get organic only as potatoes tend to suck up pesticides very easily! Scary, I know.  I always LOVED eating baked potatoes with the skin on, so I think I’ve set myself up just because of my earlier years. HA!

If you have any questions or inquiries, don’t hesitate to ask!

Next blog: probiotics!

Podcast – https://www.spreaker.com/episode/10461174