ARSENIO’S ESL PODCAST | SEASON 5 EPISODE 156 | VOCABULARY | ACADEMIC Words

Because I’ve been teaching a lot of IELTS students, I decided to do some academic words vocabulary for you guys. Again, my storytelling is always the funnest, so make sure you tune into the podcast down below. If not, do the matching and the sentence completions.

  1. accumulation (n)
  2. compile (v)
  3. discretion
  4. enforce
  5. persistent
  6. mutual
  7. restrict
  8. rigid

a. the right or ability to make a judgement or decision

b. not easily changed

c. the process by which something increases in amount

d. to keep something within strict limits

e. to make sure that a law or rule is obeyed by people

f. felt or done in the same way by each of two or more people

g. continuing to do something in a determined way

h. to make something by bringing together information from different places

Complete each sentence with a word in bold from Exercise 1.

  1. The government should _____________ tighter controls on news channels.
  2. Broadcasting companies should ___________ content more to protect children.
  3. Definition of “news” are too ___________ in the era of social media.
  4. You need to be ________ if you want to bring about major changes at work.
  5. The ____________ of online information will lead to problems for us all in the future.
  6. To make big changes, you need to ___________ evidence to show these changes are needed
  7. ____________ is needed when posting online because what is private now could be public in the future.
  8. Changes in news delivery have been of _____________ benefit for those involved.

Podcast

ARSENIO’S ESL PODCAST | SEASON 5 EPISODE 154 | SPEAKING SKILL | PREPARING & ASKING QUESTIONS

When preparing questions for a Q&A session, consider asking questions from different angles.

Find out details

Who…..? What……? Where….? When…? How…?

Elicit Justifications

  • Why do you think…..?
  • Why should…..?

Ask for illustration of points made

  • Can you give an example of that?
  • What evidence is there for…..?

Explore time frames

  • What do you see happening next year?
  • What has been the biggest lesson learned so far?
  • When did this trend begin?

Avoid loaded questions and question that may be perceived as hostile. Make sure you interactions actually includes a question the speaker can answer. When you ask a question, consider your tone of voice, body language, and facial expression to ensure effective, open communication.

Read and listen to the way the questions were asked from listening.

  1. Identify the potential problems with each one of the vocabulary terms in the box down below.
hostile           loaded             no question
  1. ……but anyway, what can we actually change? Do we have any concrete ideas?
  2. ….but isn’t the technology a little bit clumsy?
  3. …..if I may ask a question. Sorry, Rashid,…..what you’re saying is really worrying me. I don’t see how we can be giving presentations about our campaigns online! It just isn’t feasible, at all. I hear what you’re saying, but I can’t see how it will actually work in practice.
  4. I’m completely lost for words. How can we do our work on a tablet?

ARSENIO’S ESL PODCAST | SEASON 5 EPISODE 153 | VOCABULARY DEVELOPMENT | Academic Phrases

We’re back with academic phrases today! This is going to be real good for you guys in terms of phrase-building, academic texts, etc.

  • Nominal phrases, e.g., a sense of urgency, a fast-moving market
  • Verb phrases, e.g., drive through the changes, become apparent
  • Adjective phrases, e.g., blatantly obvious, aware of the need for change.
  • Adverbial phrases, e.g., behind the times, as a way of

Note that in some less formal content, phrases may have an idiomatic meaning, e.g., follow suit, go hand in hand, find your feet.

Complete each question with a phrase from Exercise 1. Change the form if necessary.

  1. Two-way communication can be _____________ when it comes to empowering staff.
  2. Flexibility and adaptability can give one company a ____________ over another.
  3. Adopting a change in strategy can be a long, _______________ for any company.
  4. When market changes occur, a company must swiftly agree on an appropriate _____________.
  5. It is imperative that staff ____________ be consulted prior to any drastic change in strategy.
  6. Transforming a company’s culture may come ____________ some staff who choose to resign.
  7. Any contentious issues with regards to a strategy will ____________ during staff meetings.
  8. Even just the notion of change can ____________ to feelings of panic among staff.

Moving To Korat as of Today | Two Residences

I never thought I’d be saying this, but I’ll be having two homes for the first time in my life. If you guys don’t follow my podcast, which is down below, you’re missing out on a journey. I know living in this other province (which made news earlier this year due to a tragic event) is going to bring in a lot more viewers and people who are interested. I never thought I’d be traveling again in Thailand. This is the first time going to another province in more than 3 years and the first time living in another since moving to Rangsit 6 years ago (not counting BKK as a move because it’s connected to Rangsit).

The Why

I don’t have an industrial-aged mindset. I’m not going to be told what to do. However, after COVID ravaged businesses and shuttered doors across BKK, along with stopping schools for four months, the innovative businesses are the only ones that survived: AR, VR, eLearning, eLearning Developmental Platforms, Testing Centers.

So, this move was supposed to happen in April, but then shutdowns and quarantines happen. When the government began announcing slow openings, that’s when two of my business partners quickly made way to Korat and opened their testing center. What this did was snagged all students from the northeast part of Thailand, as well as the north and stripped all of BKK of students.

Just think about it. If you needed to go from Los Angeles to Las Vegas (four hours drive) to take a test — but then a testing center in Bakersfield, California (less than an hour away from LA) had opened, would you still go to Vegas? Exactly.

And just like that….almost a hundred students and a ton of work for myself.

Will BKK get back to normal? Doubtful. Would I negate work in Korat to pick up a class or two in Bangkok? Absolutely NOT. My goal is to not only expand my brand but also to go where opportunities are. That’s exactly what I’m doing.

So, here’s to Korat and a new docu-series!

ARSENIO’S ESL PODCAST | SEASON 5 EPISODE 152 | CRITICAL THINKING | PERSONAL INCREDULITY

So, let’s talk about this fallacy. This occurs when people find something difficult to understand. In this situation, people say that the thing they cannot understand must be untrue or not the case, because they personally are unable to understand it. the basic idea is as follows:

  • I cannot believe X or imagine how it could be true, therefore X must be false.

The fallacy can also work in the other direction.

  • I cannot believe X is false, so it must be true.

Read the extracts from the discussion. What does each person believe or not believe? What reason does the person give?

  1. Why change something that’s working perfectly well for some system that’s too complicated to even understand. Am I alone in thinking that this is just change for change’s sake?
  2. You know as well as I do that clients want to meet face to face, to feel that someone actually cares about them! I don’t believe they’ll want to give that up. Online meetings just don’t work.
  3. When I’ve been in online meetings, there are always technical problems — I can see the client, but they can’t see me, that kind of thing. It just never works like it’s supposed to!
  4. That’s absolutely right, Rashid! How can we guarantee security if everything is going online? And i have all my files. I’ve spent the last two years improving my paper-based systems.
  5. I have my doubts. We read about security breaches at the highest government level almost every day….so, how are we going to protect ourselves? It will be impossible.
  6. How can we do our work on a tablet? They’re good for simple tasks and some fun — I know, my children use one at home — but they simply aren’t designed for sophisticated work!

ARSENIO’S ESL PODCAST | SEASON 5 EPISODE 151 | READING | LEADERSHIP & CHANGE MANAGEMENT

We’ve got a life-changing podcast on different models of leadership and change management. We’ll be talking about Lewin’s Change Model and how the eight-step approach to change management is amazing and life-transforming.

Identifying concepts and theories: Some texts present concepts rather than arguments. A concept is a general idea about something that exists or an idea about how something should be done. An argument is supported by objective reasoning.

Lewin’s change model includes a three-step approach to change management known as Unfreeze, Change, Refreeze. (a concept)

People do not like change. in a 2013 survey, 76% of workers did not want their circumstances to change. Change should therefore be implemented carefully. (an argument)

Like a climber reaching a mountain peak, leading businesses must not spend too long standing and admiring the view or they may find themselves swiftly overtaken by leaner and more adaptable mountaineers. High-profile companies such as Apple, Google, and Amazon are all examples of industry leaders which understand that they still have a mountain to climb; while other companies have mistakenly spent far too long looking at the scenery, not appreciating that further heights were there to be scaled.

We are all aware that if a business wants to succeed, it has to create a culture of innovation in a fast-changing market. When one company innovates, others will quickly follow suit. without continued creativity, a business will become stagnant, lose its competitive edge, and very quickly find itself behind the times. the need for change is blatantly obvious and yet businesses around the world fail to actively work towards change, unnecessarily suffering the consequences. Company bosses making a commitment to change is the first, and easiest, step forward. However, planning and executing a change strategy can be an uphill struggle, with organizations often withdrawing strategies at the first sign of difficulty. Fortunately, there is a lot of support for businesses in the academic field of change management, with several business models to draw on.

Skillful 4

Listen to the explanations here…..

Arsenio’s ESL Podcast | Season 5 Episode 150 | Listening | Understanding Non-standard Accents

English is spoken by millions of people worldwide, sometimes as a first language and often as a learned second or third language. As users of English in today’s world, we need to be prepared to deal with different accents and interact with different varieties of English.

Gain exposure to different accents through listening to and watching programs from media channels around the world. As well as exposing you to different accents, this will also provide you with different perspectives on the world.

When listening to different accents, practice identifying the key features of the accent. If you are going to a context where one accent is dominant, spend time familiarizing yourself with the accent before you arrive. Remember, varieties of English can also differ in the specific vocabulary used. Research differences and ask for clarification.

Task 1 in Podcast – Decide if the sentences down below are true or false.

  1. Chris argues that though a system works now, it might not in the future. T/F
  2. Hailey agrees that clients are no longer interested in face-to-face meetings. T/F
  3. Chris suggests that recording meetings may be a negative action. T/F
  4. Rashid mentions a colleague who would have worked effectively in this situation. T/F
  5. Chandini explains the strength of her views on this issue. T/F
  6. Rashid is concerned about competitors accessing confidential information. T/F
  7. Chris explains that an outside company will be totally responsible for all levels of security. T/F
  8. Hailey suggests that even top-level organizations face issues with security. T/F
  9. Chandini knows about working on tablets from her domestic situations. T/F
  10. Rashid agrees Chris’s final point is a good idea. T/F

Arsenio’s ESL Podcast | Season 5 Episode 149 | Study Skills | Checking your Reading Speed

Welcome back to another podcast and today we’re going to talk about reading speed. Now, I do think this is completely irrelevant because if you don’t pick up what you’re actually reading, the speed doesn’t matter. However, smart reading is more like it. So let’s go over some techniques that can help you.

  • Find something familiar to read.
  • Set the alarm for ten minutes.
  • Read for ten minutes at a speed that allows you to understand what you ready.
  • Count how many words you read.
  • Divide this number by ten, to find out how many words you read in one minute.
  • Do this using different texts. If you read fewer than 200-250 words per minute, even with material that is clear and interesting, it is worth trying to increase your speed.

Tips for improving your reading speed.

  • Keep your eyes moving forward to avoid re-reading parts of the text
  • Avoid moving your mouth or using your fingers to follow the lines.
  • Read with a clear purpose to keep you motivated and on track.
  • Practice reading academic material more often.
  • Actively improve your reading speed through practice.
  • Change your reading speed according to what you are reading. Slow down for sections with unknown technical words and speed up for sections with more familiar language.

Podcast

Study Skills – Reading Speed

STEPHEN COVEY’S 8TH HABIT | SEASON 6 – EPISODE 2 | The Pain

We’re here with the first episode! Well, technically the second, but let’s talk about PAIN. Let’s be honest! TELL ME YOUR PAIN! You don’t? Let me give you a list of what you might feel.

“I’m stuck, in a rut.”
“I have no life. I’m burned out—exhausted.”
“No one really values or appreciates me. My boss doesn’t have a clue of all I’m capable of.”
“I don’t feel especially needed—not at work, not by my teenage and grown children, not by my neighbors and community, not by my spouse—except to pay the bills.”
“I’m frustrated and discouraged.”
“I’m just not making enough to make ends meet. I never seem to get ahead.”
“Maybe I just don’t have what it takes.”
“I’m not making a difference.”
“I feel empty inside. My life lacks meaning; something’s missing.”
“I’m angry. I’m scared. I can’t afford to lose my job.”
“I’m lonely.”
“I’m stressed out; everything’s urgent.”
“I’m micromanaged and suffocating.”
“I’m sick of all the backstabbing politics and kissing up.”
“I’m bored—just putting in my time. Most of my satisfactions come off the job.”
“I’m beat up to get the numbers. The pressure to produce is unbelievable. I simply don’t have the time or resources to do it all.”
“With a spouse who doesn’t understand and kids who don’t listen or obey, home is no better than work.”
“I can’t change things.”

Excerpt From: Stephen R. Covey. “The 8th Habit.”

Come on, do you fit the description? Be honest with yourself. I mean, how many times have I felt this? Loneliness? Australia and Chanthaburi circa 2011-2013. Stressed out? The dawn of COVID. Micromanaged? 2016 and quit that part time job. I’m frustrated and discouraged? NOW!

“THESE ARE THE VOICES of people at work and at home—voices of literally millions of parents, laborers, service providers, managers, professionals and executives all over the world who are fighting to make it in the new reality. The pain is personal, and it’s deep. You may relate with many of the statements yourself. ” – Stephen Covey

IELTS | Reading | Cambridge 14 | T4 – P1 – The Secret of Staying Young

Welcome back to a breakdown of reading passage 1 on the Cambridge IELTS test 4! This is a first of its kind, and what I’ll be doing is breaking down T/F/NG and fill in the blank. The most difficult part about IELTS reading is finding where the key words are (far more difficult than TOEFL)….so watch how I do this.

Pheidole dentata, a native ant of the south-eastern U.S., isn’t immortal. But scientists have found that it doesn’t seem to show any signs of aging. Old worker ants can do everything just as well as the youngsters, and their brains appear just as sharp. ‘We get a picture that these ants really don’t decline,’ says Ysabel Giraldo, who studied the ants for her doctoral thesis at Boston University.

Such age-defying feats are rare in the animal kingdom. Naked mole rats can live for almost 30 years and stay fit for nearly their entire lives. They can still reproduce even when old, and they never get cancer. But the vast majority of animals deteriorate with age just like people do. Like the naked mole rat, ants are social creatures that usually live in highly organized colonies. ‘It’s this social complexity that makes P. dentata useful for studying aging in people,’ says Giraldo, now at the California Institute of Technology. Humans are also highly social, a train that has been connected to healthier aging. By contrast, most animal studies of aging use mice, worms or fruit flies, which all lead much more isolated lives.

In the lab, P. dentata worker ants typically live for around 140 days. Giraldo focused on ants at four age ranges: 20 to 22 days, 45 to 47 days, 95 to 97 days and 120 to 122 days. Unlike all previous studies, which only estimated how old the ants were, her work tracked the ants from the time the pupae became adults, so she knew their exact ages. Then she put them through a range of tests.

Giraldo watched how well the ants took care of the young of the colony, recording how often each ant attended to, carried and fed them. She compared how well 20-day-old and 95-day-old ants followed the telltale scent that the insects usually leave to mark a trail to food. She tested how ants responded to light and also measured how active they were by counting how often ants in a small dish walked across a line. And she experimented with how ants react to live prey: a tethered fruit fly. Giraldo expected the older ants to perform poorly in all these tasks. But the elderly insects were all good caretakers and trail-followers — the 95-day-old ants could track the scent even longer than their younger counterparts. They all responded to light well, and the older ants were more active. And when it came to reacting to prey, the older ants attacked the poor fruit fly just as aggressively as the young ones did, flaring their mandibles or pulling at the fly’s legs.

Then Giraldo compared the brains of 20-day-old and 95-day old ants, identifying any cells that were close to death. She saw no major differences with age, nor was there any difference in the location of the dying cells, showing that age didn’t seem to affect specific brain functions. Ants and other insects have structures in their brains called mushroom bodies, which are important for processing information, learning and memory. She also wanted to see if aging affects the density of synaptic complexes within these structures — regions where neurons come together. Again, the answer was no. What was more, the old ants didn’t experience any drop in the levels of either serotonin or dopamine — brain chemicals whose decline often coincides with aging. In humans, for example, a decrease in serotonin has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease.

‘This is the first time anyone has looked at both behavioral and neural changes in these ants so thoroughly,’ says Giraldo, who recently published the findings in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Scientists have looked at some similar aspects in bees, but the results of recent bee studies were mixed — some studies showed age-related declines, which biologists call senescence, and others didn’t. ‘For now, the study raises more questions than it answers,’ Giraldo says, ‘including how P. dentat stays in such good shape.’

Also, if the ants don’t deteriorate with age, why do they die at all? Out in the wild, the ants probably don’t live for a full 140 days thanks to predators, disease and just being in an environment that’s much harsher than the comforts of the lab. ‘The lucky ants that do live into old age may suffer a steep decline just before dying,’ Giraldo says, but she can’t say for sure because her study wasn’t designed to follow an ant’s final moments.

‘It will be important to extend these findings to other species of social insects,’ says Gene E. Robinson, an entomologist at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. This ant might be unique, or it might represent a broader pattern among other social bugs with possible clues to the science of aging in larger animals. Either way, it seems that for these ants, age really doesn’t matter.

Cambridge IELTS 14 Test 4 Passage 1

Choose one word only from the passage for each answer.

Focus on a total of 1 ___________ different age groups of ants, analysing

Behaviour:

– how well ants looked after their 2 ______________

– their ability to locate 3 ____________ using a scent trail

– the effect that 4 _____________ had on them

– how 5 ______________ they attacked prey

Brains:

– comparison between age and the 6 _____________ of dying cells in the brains of ants

– condition of synaptic complexes (areas in which 7 _____________ meet) in the brain’s ‘mushroom bodies’

– level of two 8 ______________ in the brain associated with ageing

Questions 1-8

Second phase

  • True: if the statement agrees with the information
  • False: if the statement contradicts the information
  • NG: If there is no information on this

9. Pheidole dentata ants are the only known animals which remain active for their whole lives.

10. Ysabel Giraldo was the first person to study Pheidole dentata ants using precise data about the insects’ ages.

11. The ants in Giraldo’s experiments behaved as she had predicted that they would.

12. The recent studies of bees used different methods of measuring age-related decline.

13. Pheidole dentata ants kept in laboratory conditions tend to live longer lives.

Tips & Tricks

  • If the question asks you to write two words and/or a number, this means the answer may be: one word, one word + a number, two words, two words + a number

Remember that even if a number is written as a word, it counts as a number (e.g., twenty five trees = one word and a number). You do not need to write full sentences or join words together.

Podcast