Interviewee #026 – Moustafa Sano – The Marathon Man!

I brought Moustafo on a long time ago, and here I am bringing him on again because there was a particular pain threshold he passed that I’m very captivated by.  Being able to overcome the amount of pain, a rain storm, fatigue and other things is just AMAZING. Reminds me of David Goggins, so here is my Malaysian fitness entrepreneur again!

Get in touch with Moustafa Sano

Links:

Things we discussed:

Dieting before the race.

How much sleep before the marathon.

The entire experience of the marathon itself.

Body usage.

The moment you want to give up is the 40% threshold.

Individuals hitting that threshold, ultimately giving up during the race.

Eating and recharging after the marathon.

Pain thresholds.

Listen to “Interviewee #026 – Moustafa Sano – The Marathon Man!” on Spreaker.

Thank you for listening!

Links:

  1. Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/thearseniobuckshow/
  2. Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thearseniobuckshow/?hl=en
  3. YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIzp4EdbJVMhhSnq_0u4ntA
  4. Podcasts: https://www.spreaker.com/user/thearseniobuckshow, https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/the-arsenio-buck-show/id1181794790?mt=2, https://open.spotify.com/show/0x39CEN5tHvfRtfZaAMTgQ?si=8cpdu1rTTjKHogufXh91Cw
  5. Website: https://thearseniobuckshow.com/
  6. Twitter: https://twitter.com/arseniobuckshow?lang=en

Interviewee #22 – Jonathan Darling – Personal Trainer and Ultra Marathon Runner

This is a man that’s an ordinary guy trying to make an extraordinary impact on the world.  After starting his fitness journey playing football and wrestling in high school, he began studying exercise science in college.  This propelled him into the world of bodybuilding, powerlifting, and competing for several years.  8 months ago, he decided to compete in his first ever endurance race, a 50k ultra trail race.  That is only the beginning…..

Get in touch with Jonathan Darling

Links:

 

Things we discussed:

  • How do you start in the fitness industry?
  • What the differences between powerlifting and bodybuilding.
  • Bodybuilders vs Crossfitters
  • Injecting positivity in the community.
  • The reasons why people love and are attracted to crossfit.
  • Empathy.
  • Why the interviewee became a reader?
  • The reasons why the guest signed up for a race.
  • Failure.
  • How do you develop the mental capacity to shutdown negative talk?
  • Believing in yourself.
  • How to deal with mediocrity?
  • Driving force.
  • How you demolish fear and follow your dreams.
  • Failure is better than success.
  • Goals for 2019.

Listen to “Interviewee #22 – Jonathan Darling – Personal Trainer and Ultra Marathon Runner” on Spreaker.

 

Thank you for listening!

 

Thank you so much for listening to this podcast. Please do write down some feedback and comments. Please do share this podcast to your social media.

 

Links:

 

Spartan Bag for The Beast

On the dawn of the monster, let’s take a look at what’s important for a Spartan Beast!

Essentials

Hydration Pack

Energy Gels

Protein Bar

Two pairs of socks

Arm sleeve of some kind to protect you

Sunscreen

Compression (shirt and shorts)

Distance running shoes

Waist belt

  • The hydration pack, given the distance, is absolutely essential.  Because I’m running in such a sweltering and humidity-filled climate, dehydration, especially during the beast, will lead to a lot of problems on the course.  Yes, water stations will be scattered, but that won’t be good enough to defeat a course that’s 21km long. I bought one of these packs recently and I’m super excited to use it. Option: run with a bottle, but I totally wouldn’t recommend it.
  • Energy gels made their debut when I first ran the Spartan in KL, a very memorable monster I had to defeat and befriended a Malaysian entrepreneur during the process.  In a 13km race, I probably took one around the 5-7km mark and maybe towards the end (not even needed).  In a sprint, it’s not needed at all.  However, the Beast is an entire new beast, and it’s absolutely needed for the beating your body will take.  I did a Tough Mudder three years ago, and that I didn’t have ANYTHING to help me through the entire course.  The climate wasn’t suffocating, though.  Coll temperatures (around 15 degrees celcius and maybe went up to about 20-25) made it the most enjoyable race (maybe not the best — Bali’s Tough Mudder was pure heaven). Thailand, on the other hand, isn’t like that.  Stack yourself with gels.
  • Any form of food during the race will work.  Getting some food, protein, carbs or anything that has energy in you will significantly reduce all the negative effects that will take place during the race.  However, having a melted protein bar will do you no good, so stash a bar or two in the refrigerator (or even the freezer for an x amount of time) to have it nice and cold before race time.  1-2 hours in, it’s a edible bar.
  • Doubling up on socks reduces the chances of having to take off your shoes over, and over, and over during the race, smacking it against the ground to get those imaginary (what it seems like during the race) and microscopic rocks out of your shoes.
  • Arm sleeves and gloves are your best friend! Honestly, don’t be the big-tough-guy-bonehead that says “gloves are for __________.”  Carrying, dragging, holding buckets, etc will get increasingly difficult after the 10km mark, so please, don’t be the idiot.  Your arms will look like Freddy Kruger got a hold of you after the race.  Keep those arms looking gorgeous and protect yourself.
  • The waist belt I bought a couple years ago is still durable and still works.  This has gone through about 3-4 Spartan races and plenty of city runs.  Having this enables me to carry my protein bars and gels; and even if I have to crawl, I can rotate it to the back so it doesn’t get ruined.  SMART!

One of the biggest problems I had with running shoes back in 2015 had to be the only pair I had at the time.  I bought a pair of under armour shoes that I KNEW wouldn’t survive during the race, but didn’t want to use the other ones (in the video down below) instead.  I decided to wear them and probably halfway through the race, I was limping because it was painful and I had a pinching sensation on the outer portion of my right knee.  Problematic to say the least.  Test your shoes, in the grit, and see if they hold up.

Spartan Beast: Hua Hin, Thailand — Signed Up + No Longer “Obese”

A few days ago I was jumping in JOY and ECSTASY.  Never have I ever been so elated because of a machine.  When I saw BMI (Body Mass Index) the other day, I saw the Physique ratings at standard.  Six weeks prior to this, my physique was apparently obese, although I look relatively thin.  My metabolism before was at 35 (and I’m 30) and now it’s at 30. Let’s go over some of the categories that are on this piece of paper.

  • Weight – 76.6KG (2.3kg drop from last week)
  • Fat % – 21.4%
  • Fat Mass – 16.4kg
  • Muscle Mass – 57.1kg
  • Metabolic Age – 30
  • BMI – 23.4

Desirable Range

Fat % – 11.0 – 21.9

Fat Mass 7.4 – 16.9kg

Here’s about what 50% of the paper says, but my fat percentage and fat mass is 0.5 kg off after being about 2.0kg ver.

Now, does this change anything? No.  Does this change the fact that I feel my absolute healthiest that I’ve ever felt? Nope.  I’m super grateful that I’ve kept myself committed to going to a gym.  Everything is starting to unfold as it should and I’m super excited about it.

Also, I just signed up for the monstrous Beast in Hua Hin which will take place at the dawn of November.  Upon completion, I will be able to claim my Spartan Trifecta shirt and medal — what I’ve been chasing after for two years.

There are going to be videos coming to you guys at a grand scale, but in my podcast down below, I talk about what my dieting was during the past 6 weeks..

 

Podcast

Interviewee #17 – AJ’s Fitness Journey & Entrepreneurship

First time I met this man, I was in awe.  The size of him was unlike anything I had ever seen in my life.  If I can compare him to Evander Holyfield, one of America’s famous boxers, he’s a bit close.  Nonetheless, after chatting it up with him and hearing/seeing his charisma + his story, I decided to bring him on the show.

AJ is an NSCA Certified Personal Trainer and Strength and Conditioning coach.

​AJ’s athletic background and his ongoing curiosity to the latest nutrition and exercise research fuels his passion to assist and educate individuals in fulfilling any fitness and wellness goals. AJ strongly believes in taking a multi-dimensional approach towards optimal health and works with his clients to find ways to incorporate it in their lifestyles.

Get in touch with AJ of Bangkok, Thailand

– About fitness training, personal training and coaching.

Links:

 

Things we discussed:

  • Introduction about himself.
  • How long has AJ been in Bangkok.
  • How he started his work for the Lab and how long he’s been working for the Lab?
  • Discussing about the beginning of his fitness journey.
  • How he ended up in ESPN as a boxer.
  • How he ended up in the national championship.
  • Decision to become a personal trainer in boxing.
  • When the last time he fought in a boxing match.
  • How he ended up in other fields like engineering, teaching Mathematics, being  an online teacher, and digital nomading by travelling to Europe, India and Asia?
  • Your advice on about being a digital nomad or location – independent entrepreneurs.
  • Advise to people about being digital nomads or location – independent.
  • You need to be dedication in your work or side hustling by investing yourself.
  • Find something that is helping you and others. Think big and dare to dream.
  • Why the interviewee ended up in Thailand.
  • Applying teaching jobs from Thailand, South Korea and China.
  • When did you decide to become a fitness trainer?
  • How he branded himself as a fitness trainer?
  • Why the most fit is considered unhealthy?
  • How do you approach your fitness and your health?
  • Talking about mindfulness and personal development.
  • Talking about diets.
  • Be attentive to what and how you are doing with your body and your fitness.
  • Make the wholesome food as your priority in your health and diet.
  • You need to have quality diets between farm raised meat and plant based.
  • Your opinions on about keto-diet from a personal trainer.
  • Do your research about certain diets and lifestyles before you make a decision on which to follow.
  • Marketing about AJ’s personal branding.
  • Balance all in mindfulness, relationships, health and personal development, that’s what it’s all about being healthy.
  • What is the interviewee’s inspiration?
  • What is the interviewee’s outlook from 2 years from now?
  • What is the most difficult workout?
  • What is the number one condition for fat burning?

 

Thank you for listening!

 

Thank you so much for joining me for this podcast. Please do write down some feedbacks and comments. Please do share this podcast to your social media.

 

Links:

Interviewee #15 – Moustafa Sano On Fitness, Learning Five Languages, & Fitting In

It was an afternoon when I received a few video messages in my Instagram inbox.  Here was a guy that I’ve never met before sending me videos.  I was a bit adamant in terms of opening those videos, but I’m glad I did because it ended up  being one of the most inspirational guys ever!

 

Get in touch with Moustafa Sano of Malaysia

– About fitting in, learning 5 languages and fitness.

 

Links:

 

Things we discussed:

  • Rite of passage in our pre – teen years.
  • Different cultures, values and morals.
  • Understanding of other cultures are important.
  • People’s stories because people deserve to be listened to.
  • Different cultures have different ways of communication.
  • Pain turned to sports without realising it was self – expression to pain.
  • Self – image is important.
  • Need to have an empathy.
  • Fitness is important.
  • Don’t keep your pain inside you.
  • Pain is another key to success.
  • Racial tension or racism in Malaysia.
  • Learning Malay language (Bahasa) through playing football within his neighbourhood.
  • Languages are a way to bridge the gap between foreigners and locals.
  • Talking about personal development on “empathy”.
  • Benefits of reading – how you contextualise?
  • Personal development books that change your life and skills.
  • Pain is a good form of motivation.
  • Being proactive vs reactive.
  • Motivation comes from your morals and values and live life through your imagination.
  • The best way to learn a languages is by getting yourself outside — not by writing.
  • Learn about people’s languages.
  • Watching movies and listening to podcasts.
  • Learning different cultural – expressions through watching movies.
  • Talking about paradigm shifting of habits to growth.
  • Read more, talk more and train or challenge your brain to keep yourself fit in terms of spirituality.
  • The power of giving.
  • Believe in your words.
  • Life filled with fulfilment when you give people more.
  • The impact that you try to give to this world and the people.
  • The purpose of suffering and pain.

 

Thank you for listening!

 

Thank you so much for joining me for this podcast. Please do write down some feedbacks and comments. Please do share this podcast to your social media.

 

Links:

 

Podcast

Inteviewee #14: Hakeem Khan on Being A Fitness Entrepreneur In Malaysia

While standing in a long line in a musty old gym at Nexus International School in Putrajaya, Kuala Lumpur, I met not just the ultra-gorgeous muslim girl, but I met this man — Hakeem Khan.  We chatted it up about him being a powerlifter and befriended each other within that time-frame of checking in to the Spartan Race.  Since then, we’ve maintained communication and I saw his Instagram exploding with an amazing amount of content.  He was changing lives through his own personal training program and so many other things, so I told myself the next time I come here, I’m going to do a podcast with him.  Here it is!

Show Notes

“Money isn’t everything because the most important thing will be making an impact on someone’s lives”

 

Get in touch with Hakeem Khan of Malaysia

  • Fitness entrepreneur

 

Links:

1) YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVZnrSCZIVEWFnhTUCHenQA

2) Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hakeeemkhan/?hl=en

3) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/barbellnationmy/

4) Website: http://barbellnation.com.my/

 

Things we discussed:

  • How did you start??
  • What inspired you to become a fitness entrepreneur?
  • The real reason why you want to become a fitness entrepreneur.
  • Who is your inspiration? Why?
  • What does the gym in Pakistan look like?
  • How do you start a gym in Pakistan through DIY?
  • Who taught you how to use the gym’s facilities in Pakistan?
  • How many laps?
  • What is your diet?
  • How did you feel the first time you used a gym in Pakistan?
  • What was your age when you came back to Malaysia?
  • Did you finish your secondary school?
  • Working part-time while in secondary school.
  • What did you do before you became a fitness entrepreneur?
  • Started to work in Celebrity Gym.
  • Started to work as a sales consultant with Celebrity Gym through training.
  • Training by the gym company to become a Celebrity Fitness.
  • What is a powerlifting?
  • What was your setback after your car accident?
  • How did you maintain your mental fortitude to get you through?
  • What was your training after your accident?
  • How did it feel after your accident?
  • Why did you decide to leave Celebrity Fitness?
  • Why did you decide to do what you do?
  • What is your self – awareness? Why do you want to help people?
  • The power of sharing and fulfilment.
  • What do you think about the market for fitness business in Malaysia?
  • How do you maintain your diet?
  • What is the philosophy for your diet?
  • What are your goals and plans?
  • What is your advice for people who aspire to become a fitness entrepreneur?

 

Thank you for listening!

 

Thank you so much for joining me for this podcast. Please do write down some feedbacks and comments. Please do share this podcast to your social media. Embed video down below!

 

Links:

 

Questions & Answers: Why The Spartan/Tough Mudder Competitions?

It was a perfect question at a perfect time.  Back in 2015, I put my mind, body and spirit to the test.  In one of the most difficult races of my life, I saw everything flash before my eyes: ewwwww! Black man! Negro! Pimp! Black people are disgusting! — yes, these are the comments that Thai women spewed upon me.  Not only that, in 2015, I worked for a company where a dutchman, who is known as a pedaphile here in Thailand, got more praise at a job (how does he have a job being a pedaphile in Thailand is beyond me) than me.  2015 was also the last stint of holding myself to being a victim.  It was difficult.

So, like many people, I joined this competition to hopefully get over that mental hurdle.  Did it help? Not only did it help, but it opened something within my mind that pressured me to better myself.

If it wasn’t for these redunculous competitions where I put myself through so much agony, I wouldn’t be where I am today, right? Something inside me needed to be turned around.  My paradigm needed to change or else it would’ve driven me to pure insanity.

Back in 2016, I still remember working at a job in the heart of Bangkok and they said, “sorry, you can’t teach TOEIC (a test for non-native English speakers) because you’re black and the students don’t like you).  I quit that job in a heartbeat and continued searching.

This is why I do these competitions because now I’ve re-created a reality that none of that trash from 2-5 years ago exists.  Sure, I get the occasional racist looks, but hardly ever.  I stayed away from racist Thai news websites that demonized black people….and now all of that has seemingly vanished.  Let’s get into this in my podcast down below!

Podcast

Evaluating My Spartan Score

So I was practically top 25%, and almost 20%, in all categories.  If I look at the time, it’s not that good.  I don’t know exactly what happened during the race, but the obviously made it to be very difficult for attaining a good time.  I think I completed my Spartan Sprint last year in Thailand in a much better time than this, and I kinda walked the entire time!

So, how can I go about getting better? This is the best because I know where I am and where I want to be.

If you ask me, “where do you wanna be?”

Top 5%.  That’s always been a goal.  However, the terrain and everything could be so difficult to hit that mark.

I’ve gotten much stronger.  Again, I was passing so many people buy and didn’t have any stress on my body.  I’ve woken up this morning and it doesn’t even feel like I did the race yesterday.  No soreness or anything.  However, it didn’t reflect the time.  Might I say that I had to wait about 30 minutes total throughout all the obstacles, especially the one where we had to go through a creek and into a river.

I’m on a Spartan group on an app and I told everyone some vital information.

Cardio! Cardio! Cardio! There needs to be a lot of focus on cardio because that’s all part of the race.  One of the racers said, “I didn’t think I needed cardio.”  He failed miserably.  Another one said he did cardio everyday but it didn’t prepare him for the amount of hills the race had.  This is the super scary part about doing races in places like Malaysia.  They use hills and terrain to JACK YOU UP — EFFECTIVELY.

Having a very strong core can get you through most upper-body exercises.  One girl had me bust out in laughing by saying, “man, I did all that just to climb two feet over and fall.”  I laughed, but with her, not at her.  I then showed my strength by using the circles on the black-plastered wall and went all the way across with ease.  How? Strong core and utilizing it rather than using my upper-body.  It does revolve around technique, but your core is the foundation of it ALL.

Upper body, of course, is essential.  I’ve done lots of building up all areas the top and it proved to be extremely vital.

So, now in preparation for my Super, which is double the distance of the sprint, I’m going to do a lot of core building, strength on top, and tons of cardio.

 

Spartan Race: Seminyih, Malaysia…ACHIEVED! But……

WHAT. A. RACE.

Where should I begin? Let’s me take you from the beginning so I can provide some flow.

I arrived maybe around 9:15 to the station KTM – Kajang station.  This was nearest to the super rural area the where the race was being held.  From there, Ubers was stacked all around me.  I pressed it and got an immediate message – my uber was right across the street.  HOW CONVENIENT! He was a funny guy, asking me why I don’t have a girlfriend in Thailand.

Told him the truth. You guys know that story. LOL

There was a logjam about 2km outside the race area, so I had him pull over and I walked it from there.  Enthusiasts, not as many as I thought there would be, were making their way to registration.  Loads of tents and little shops were stacked within the area, giving my hope that this venue would be 1000 times better than the last at Putrajaya Heights last July.  It exceeded my expectations — and THEN SOME.  The registration line was about 10 minutes compared to 1.5 hours last time.  Bag drop was convenient with a bunch of smiley faces and women asking me how the race was (of course after) and there was a lot of area and merchandise around.

I was probably the 3rd wave of the Open.  There were a ton of people behind me, all whom were enthusiastic.  Some were first timers and others were returning.  You had people from Brunei, Hong Kong, Singapore, China and other places all around.  When the race started, it was all running, mostly uphill (as Malaysia mostly does) and then were the rocks.  That’s right.  The first obstacle, aside from the walls and things we had to jump through, under, and over, was the nastiest of them all.  This is where the fun began because the comedians started coming out in force.  Being on an obstacle course enables you to speak freely amongst your fellow samaritans who are going through the same pain.

At this time, this is when I knew I had gotten much strong since last September.  Carrying the bucket of rocks up the hill didn’t present me with a problem.  In fact, I was zooming past everyone else who seemed gassed and out of breath — 2km in?! I was screaming motivational things while hearing the echo of “aroo” deep in the forests and even nearby.  Directly following that was the rope climb.  I finally climbed up that bad boy; however, I freaked out when I was coming down and I zoomed down the rope, gripping it with my fingers and feeling fire tear apart my thumb on my left hand and my ring finger on my right, leaving a blister on one hand and two layers of skin on the rope from…..me.  This was beyond painful for about 1km.  After that, the river, which was SUEPR FUN.  There were women saying, “I HAVE A PLAN TO CATCH!”  People were laughing and just having fun at that point.  Being in a shaded, sketchy, peculiar area between two sides of a mountain, trekking through currents puts the “omg” into what Spartan should be about.

From there on out, there weren’t any noticeable or stand-outish things that came about — just more laughs and weird obstacles.  I am now 3/3 in the javelin toss, hitting my target and cheering for myself.  There were some GORGEOUS women nearby saying, “goodjob!” Another one, who must’ve been from Eastern Europe and on the same team of the 10 that were standing around, asked me “tips?”  I didn’t know what she was saying, but when I realized it, I was flabbergasted and helped two of the ladies — unsuccessfully.  This definitely had to be the funnest Spartan or any race in general.  It tips the Tough Mudder in Melbourne, Australia 3 years ago and tops the Tough Mudder in Mesa, Arizona from last year.

Towards the end, there was a Malaysian guy who was running by himself…pushing himself.  I decided to run beside him; and both him and I met up with an Indian guy.  The three of us started running alongside some other foreigners and funny Ukrainians before getting to a difficult part of the course — the end!  This mashed a bunch of obstacles together: backstroking 75 meters, another river with a current, monkey bell swings, and a few others.  When I finished, I saw a gorgeous shirt and medal waiting for me.  That was definitely a 10km beast of a race.  That wasn’t 7km….and they had Super/Beast obstacles within it, too.  The Spartan Sprint last year in Chon Buri, Thailand was a cake walk compared to this.

So, showers, chats with so many people, figuring out my next step with the trifecta and everything in ensued.  Now came the most difficult challenge of my life.

Because this race was tucked away in a jungle plantation, I wasn’t too nervous about finding a taxi until after a race.  There were taxis, also known as extortionists (and way worse than Thai taxis), sitting outside the grounds.  However, they were all taken because they had customers inside.  I never thought about that because I knew taxis were a ripoff.  I saw one taxi driver, and later saw him at my hotel.  That story will follow.

No Ubers, no grabs, no nothing! I was left walking….about 5km, hoping either someone would help take me to a town or a taxi would come.  I would’ve paid anything at any given time to get the hell out of there.  Some people pulled over, but not for me.  Next thing I know I see a car, coming towards me, flash its lights and I said, “OMG! SAVED!”  My man Anson, who is down below in the photo, probably saved me from dying.  That’s no exaggeration, either.

image1

All in all, he sent me all the way to an LRT line.  After 15 minutes, this particular line wrapped around KL and I saw Berjaya Times Square, just across the street from where my hotel was.  Instead of continuing on, I got off, talked to the guy, and I was able to exit the station and walk to my hotel.

Oh, and guess who was there? That f***er that denied me a ride to begin with.  Get this.  From the KTM Kajang to the race grounds was about 23 ringits, which equates to about 7 USD.  Kinda expensive in Thailand.  However, this guy told me someone AT MY HOTEL went to the race, too! The bad part? The taxi charged him 400 ringits there and back, equivalent to more than 100$ USD!  Could you believe that?! That’s why I NEVER TAKE TAXIS in KL and haven’t in almost five years.  They’re cheats beyond belief.

I needed to tell all of you that in case you travel here.

And with that beings said, a couple more blogs are coming up about my time and future races, so stay tuned and a podcast is here for your appetite!