Fitness Entrepreneurs Pod #1: Conditioning + Spartan Training Tips

Boy! This was an exciting podcast.  Moustafo and Hakeem, two podcasters (in their own right) and fitness entrepreneurs who live in Malaysia, joined me this morning to talk about conditioning and Spartan training.  I’m amazed how much knowledge these young individuals have in the health spectrum of everything.  Because this will be a 2-3 weekly type of podcast, I do want you guys to send your questions in.  The next podcast will be on Crossfit, so anything crossfit related would be great!

Get in touch with Fitness entrepreneurs

– The art of conditioning and Spartan training.

Links:

Hakeem Khan

 

Moustafa Sano

 

Things we discussed:

  • Introduction given by the host and his guests.
  • The differences between cardio and conditioning.
  • How the guests condition their bodies?
  • The length of their training.
  • Building of death leaps and squad.
  • Understand what your goals for training are.
  • Talking about trying marathon.
  • Moustafo shared his Rugby story.
  • Sharing about unfortunate accidents and injuries.
  • What are the basics of conditioning training?
  • Sharing about running and marathon.
  • Final thoughts by the guests.

 

Thank you for listening!

 

Thank you so much for joining me for this podcast. Please do write down some feedbacks and comments. Please do share this podcast to your social media.

 

Links:

Podcast

 

Rhythms of Life + Power of Consistency

“I don’t want you thinking of the rhythms you can do for this week, month, or even the next ninety days; I want you to think about what you can do for the rest of your life. The Compound Effect—the positive results you want to experience in your life—will be the result of smart choices (and actions) repeated consistently over time. You win when you take the right steps day in and day out. But you set yourself up for failure by doing too much too soon.”

This is in regards to the last blog/podcast.  When you’re in marriage, you’re going to have to do things way outside the box.  Do things that you would have never done before.  Surprise him/her.  Buy those plane tickets to a utopia.  If you don’t do these things, relationships become stagnant.  The two individuals begin dying rather than growing together.

Story of Richard In The Podcast

The Power of Consistency

I looked back on my blogs from last year, and I noticed that were was a stray of days that I didn’t do a blog.  My numbers suffered; viewers disengaged; and the Big Mo was gone.  Not only that, but when you fall out of that consistency “frequency,” it’s even harder to get back in as you’ve heard in Richard’s story.

People, at the beginning of the year, hire a personal trainer to bust their ass, and they ultimately fall into that same bad habit.

Another example would be students here in Thailand.  I’ve seen students who have an insane amount of discipline, and I’ve seen others who study English for the sake of learning the language.  That’s the wrong way to do it.

For example, let’s say I had a student by the name of Note.  Note was very good at conversation and I asked him, “how did you learn conversation?” He said, “I repeated everything I heard in movies and I talk to myself in the mirror.”

About 99% of the human population wouldn’t do that because they’re scared of what “others” might think of them.

Example number 2 — Kim Kim.  Kim Kim, at the age of 15, spoke better than most Asians all across Asia.  Her accent is sound and she has very few grammatical errors while speaking.  How did she learn? Just like my companion 11-years-ago by the name of Ezra Goings did — surround yourself with the language.

“I love English.  English is life.  I breathe it. I love it so much.  I hate Thai.”

That’s what she said. She hates her own language.  She actually even speaks to children and others in the community in English, which is funny because she says “excuse me” with a stern voice.  What are the reactions? Looks of awe.

I hope you understand what point I’m trying to make here.  Through consistency, riding the Big Mo, and unrelenting determination can come some of the greatest lessons and learning experiences in life.  It’s not always about taking a massive jump and pushing down on the pump as quick as possible.  Look at rowers — you know — the people who pedal like hell in lakes while sitting in canoes.  Could you imagine if they went as fast as possible at the beginning of the race? They would die down.

Other examples could be like the “beauty pill,” which is sold here in Thailand.  Women, of all walks of life, take this pill (which is extremely dangerous) so they can lose weight.  They don’t want to put in the work in the gym…they just want to “become” slim.  Discipline is the lesson.

Podcast

https://www.spreaker.com/user/thearseniobuckshow/rhythms-of-life-power-of-consistency

 

Routine Power

Some of our best intentions fail because we don’t have a system of execution. When it comes down to it, your new attitudes and behaviors must be incorporated into your monthly, weekly, and daily routines to affect any real, positive change. A routine is something you do every day without fail, so that eventually, like brushing your teeth or putting on your seatbelt, you do it without conscious thought. Similar to our discussion in the Habits section, if you look at anything you do that’s successful, you’ll see that you’ve probably developed a routine for it. These routines ease life’s stresses by making our actions automatic and effective. To reach new goals and develop new habits, it’s necessary to create new routines to support your objectives.

Excerpt From: Darren Hardy. “The Compound Effect.” iBooks.

Remember what I said a couple days ago? I know what I said because I was sitting there, reading and speaking it when I said it (name the movie).

When I first moved to Thailand, I always had the habit of putting my seatbelt on.  After a while, and seeing that there weren’t any readily ready seat belts in the majority of transportation in Thailand, I stopped using it.  That’s one of the worst habits ever.  And you know what, Thailand has one of the worst traffic fatality rates in the world (second – behind Libya).  You want to know why? You guessed it!

The key to becoming world-class in your endeavors is to build your performance around world-class routines. It can be difficult, even futile, to predict or control what will show up in the middle of your workday. But you can almost always control how your day starts and ends. I have routines for both. I’ll share aspects of each here to give you some ideas and to help you better understand the power and importance of building your new behaviors into disciplined routines. Starting with my goals in mind, I designed my behaviors and routines accordingly. Perhaps in sharing some of what works for me, you’ll identify strategies you’d like to try.”

And like I shared with you a few days ago, know that this is the most important aspect of it all.   For those of you who want to know Darren Hardy’s Routine, tune into my podcast!

Podcast

https://www.spreaker.com/user/thearseniobuckshow/momentum-continued-darren-hardys-morning

 

 

Darren Hardy: Chapter 4 – Momentum

Harnessing The Power of The Big Mo

It’s like when in the morning when I wake up on fire, do a podcast, drop clothes off at the dry-cleaning, do my Instagram posts, and a few other things.  It’s all about momentum.  You guys have experienced the Big Mo one way or another.  It could be during your workouts, commute to work (responding to tons of emails), or even using “down-time” as “power-time.”

Isaac Newton’s Law of Inertia sums it up.  Couch potatoes stay couch potatoes.  People like Gary Vee, who’s always on the run, stays on the run.  It’s all about getting in that successful rhythm.

The same thing happens when a rocket is launched off the launchpad.  Recently I was watched the beloved Elon Musk shoot off a rocket into orbit on Space X (YouTube).  At first, it was ridiculously slow.  I said, “that’s how fast rockets are?”  However, after a few minutes, that bad boy was traveling at an astounding rate per second.  The hardest part was getting off the ground.  Kind of like a plane taking off.  At first it’s a little bit slow, but after about 800 meters, it’s going pretty fast until the pilot lifts the wheel and up-up-and away!

You’re going to need a lot of energy to break the initial inertia – but once you get going, watch out!

Ever wonder why successful people tend to get more successful… the rich get richer… the happy get happier… the lucky get luckier.

“But momentum works on both sides of the equation—it can work for you or against you. Since the Compound Effect is always working, negative habits, when left unchecked, can build up steam and send you into a tailspin of “unlucky” circumstances and consequences.” – Darren Hardy

Like when you initially get acquainted with the “ugly group” at school.  The negative habits, plus the consequences, will come pouring in.  This is the law and this is how it works.  Also, it’s hard to break out of it.  You can’t just “jump-out” a gang without severe consequences.

How do you get “Big Mo” to pay you a visit?

1. Making new choices based on your goals and core values
2. Putting those choices to work through new positive behaviors
3. Repeating those healthy actions long enough to establish new habits
4. Building routines and rhythms into your daily disciplines
5. Staying consistent over a long enough period of time”

When the iPod was initially launched in 2001 (I had no idea!), they had a 30% revenue growth.  However, the next year it went to -33%.  2003 was still in the negative but in 2004, and when I started to see it on TV shows on MTV, it went into a 18% surplus.  60%……70%.  BOOM!  This is momentum.

Podcast

Five Major Deposits Into An Emotional Bank Account

It’s time to figure out how to build an emotional bank account.

Understanding The Individual 

What might be perceived as a deposit through the eyes of you might not constitute as one for someone else.  Better yet, it might even be a withdrawal.  Going on a walk, eating ice cream, or doing an activity out of ‘guilt’ will further dampen the account.

Stephen Covey talked about having a friend who was a college professor.  He had a terrible relationship with his teenage son.  This man’s entire life was academic, and thought his son was wasting away his life by using his “hands” instead of using his mind. As a result, he was constantly on the boy’s back, and, in moments of regret, he would try to make deposits that just didn’t work.  What happened more was the boy began perceiving his gestures to be even more rejecting.

So, after Stephen spoke to him about this, he decided to engage with his son in a project to build a Wall of Chin around their home.  Ridiculous time consuming, but the bonding experience occurred whereas that son moved through that phase in his life and into an increased desire to develop his mind.

Our tendency is to project out of our own autobiographies what we think other people want or need.  We project our intentions on the behavior of others.  We interpret what constitutes a deposit based on our own needs and desires, either now or when we were at a similar age or stage in life.  If they don’t interpret our effort as a deposit, our tendency is to take it as a rejection of our well intentioned effort and to give up. – Stephen Covey

“Do unto others as yo would have others do unto you.”

Attending To The Little Things

There was a time Stephen took his sons out for a memorable day trip involving gymnastics, wrestling matches, hotdogs and other things.  At the end of the day, they were watching a movie when Stephen realized one of his sons fell asleep.  The older brother and Stephen kept on watching until the end.  When it was over, he picked up his son, put a coat around him and walked him to the car.  He then realized after getting home that his six-year-old son began to go through withdrawals.  In the car ride home, Stephen tried asking him questions and the answers were very bland.  He wondered what was going on until the very end of the night, his son, who was sleeping in the other bed, turned around with tears and quivering lips and chin before asking, “Daddy, if I were cold, would you put your coat around me, too?”

Of all the events that happened that day, the most important one was a little act of kindness.

What a powerful, personal lesson that is.  I felt the same way when my mother obtained her income tax and took us to “The tower.”  She bought my brother videos games and when I asked for a pair of shoes, my brother influenced her decision and said no.  The entire ride home I was crying, at the age of 15, because I felt she cared more about my brother than I.  People, including myself, are very tender and sensitive inside.

Keeping Commitments

I’ve talked about this subject quite a few times already.  When you cancel over and over and over, the person’s tolerance level will only go so high.  That feeling of distrust and “you don’t care about me” begins to amplify until someone just gives up.  This has happened a lot with me in Thailand.  I canceled my friend on so many different occasions, her ultimately going on a rant and pity party saying, “you don’t give a s*** about me.”  I felt terrible.  If you can’t keep your promise, don’t promise to begin with!

Clarifying Expectations

This is one of those subjects that happen all the time, especially at work.  When someone wants to know their job description and how much they need to do, they can get into a verbal battle with their boss, resulting in an argument that happens over and over and over again.  This happens because of ambiguous expectations around goals and roles.

That’s why it’s so important whenever you come into a new situation to get all the expectations out on the table.  People will begin to judge each other through those expectations.  And if they feel like their basic expectations have been violated, the serve of trust is diminished.  We create many negative situations by simply assuming that our expectations are self-evident and that they are clearly understood and shared by other people. – Stephen Covey

Apologizing Sincerely When You Make A Withdrawal

  • I was wrong.
  • That was unkind of me.
  • I showed you no respect.
  • I gave you no dignity, and I’m deeply sorry.
  • I embarrassed you in front of your friends and I had no call to do that.  Even though I wanted to make a point, I never should have done it.  I apologize.”

It takes a great deal of strength to apologize quickly.

I was eating my favorite pizza in the world and salad when my staff came in five minutes before class began to bring students inside.  I told her, “I’m eating.”  Both her, and the maid, completely disregarded my comment; so this resulted in my standing up, grabbing my belongings in haste and storming out of the class.  In doing so, she asked me, “are you ok?”

I retorted, “all I wanna do is eat my pizza and peace and I can’t even do that.”

She came in a couple minutes later (when I went into the computer room) and apologised.  Later, I felt bad and I apologized, too.  I told her if I don’t eat and get interrupted while trying to get energy in my body, I have a tendency of exploding.  OOPS!

Hopefully these things will help you guys going forward and my podcast is down below!

 

 

Napoleon Hill: Lawrence Massacre + Ending of Self-Control.

If and when an angry person starts in to vilify and abuse you, justly or unjustly, it’s your reaction and the retaliation in a like manner where you will either be drawn down to that person’s mental level, or rise above it.  If you do fall down to their level, that means that person is dominating you.

On the other hand, if you just refuse to become angry and have that self-composure needed to keep you calm, you will take the other person by surprise.  Retaliating with a weapon that the other person is unfamiliar with will catch them off guard and easily dominate them.

Look at the majority of salespeople around the planet.  When an angry customer comes in hailing and flailing expletives and adjectives of all kinds, are they going to retaliate in the same manner? Absolutely not.  When the outburst subsides, the person who was using vilification will feel like a……douche.

Always remember, like attracts like! There’s no denying this.

Lawrence Massacre Story On Podcast

 

Summary of Self-Control

We’ve learned that our thoughts and actions towards others resemble an electric magnet which attracts to us the same sort of thought and the same sort of action that we, ourselves, create.

We have learned that the human mind responds in kind, to whatever thought impressions it receives.  We have learned that kindness begets kindness and unkindness and injustice beget unkindness and injustice.

Easy, huh?

Everything we put out comes back in a much larger measure.  We have learned that the human mind responds in kind, to all sensory impressions it receives.

Now it’s time to go into lesson seven which is an extremely critical one – Habit of Doing More Than Paid For.