Napoleon Hill’s Failure – Identifying Your Turning Points — Part 1 of 2

While I do not mean to convey the impression that I believe all of our acts to be controlled by causes beyond our power to direct, yet I strongly urge you to study and correctly interpret those causes which mark the most vital turning-points of your life; the points at which your efforts are diverted – from the old into new channels – in spite of all that you can do.  At least refrain from accepting any defeat as failure until you shall have had time to analyze the final result. – Napoleon Hill

This is one of the funnest things to do in analyzing where you were and where you want to go.  Remember Steve Jobs said, “you can never connect the dots looking forward, only backwards.”  This is imperative and here’s what I came about with my turning points…I’m going to separate this into two podcasts and two blogs so not saturate everyone with so much information.

First Turning-Point: Bad Money In Chanthaburi.

My first job I got only 600$ USD a month, which is about 18,000 baht.  This salary, for any native English speaker, is downright criminal.  I wasn’t at the top of my game, but I was fresh in the world of teaching.  After being ridiculously threatened, berated, constantly scrutinized and talk badly to, receiving despicable looks from the parents because I was color, piss-poor working conditions and a bunch of empty promises – I had to make a massive financial decision.  My savings was plummeting and I was going to go 60 days without pay from October-November.  What did I do? I had to do what was in the best interest of me versus what other people wanted.

Second Turning Point: 10$ To My Name – Made An Oath

After trekking down to the south of Thailand to continue my teaching, I was hit with a financial disaster.  Having agreed to a 1000$ USD amount per month (which puts me in the top 50% of Native-English teachers in Thailand) I didn’t get paid for the month of October.  In saying that, November was going to be a very difficult; if not, the most difficult financial month of my life.  After borrowing money from my department head to last me for the month, I made an oath to myself: “I will never be this broke again.”  Having only 10$ to my name was one of the scariest moments of my entire teaching career here in Thailand.  10$! I had to do two-week visa runs because I didn’t have a visa or work permit; no family willing to transfer me money; no friends around to help me out; NOTHING! After finally getting a lump sum of money, I rejoiced and I never looked back.

Third & Fourth Turning Points Are In The Podcast Down Below.

Ask yourself the question, “have I overcome financial hardships? And when I did, did I improve on my life?”

 

Money Talk – Keeping It Slow & Easy

As I said in my last blog, it’s time to track one habit a week.  This is the beginning, so don’t get bent out-of-shape about it.  Pick a habit that has the greatest control over you, and once you start reaping the rewards of the Compound Effect, you’ll want to introduce this to your friends a family, too.

Let’s say you want to lose weight.  Your goals is to track everything you put in your mouth from dawn until dusk.  Pay attention to your sodium intakes.  Pay attention to how many sweets you consume.  For example, I’m a Gummy Bear Type-Of-Guy – meaning I LOVE to eat my gummy bears.  However, I believe this is going to have a very bad long-term effect, so I decided to track how often I eat them and it’s practically everyday.  Two days ago I said NO! However, yesterday I treated myself to a few bags that was about 30g’s in total, which is well under the 75g the American Heart Association requires not to go over.

If you want to talk about beverages, track those sugary drinks and glasses of wine.  Anything you consume in general MUST be tracked.

Again, writing things down sounds simple, but only when you start it.  That’s why I’m asking that you commit to choosing a category and a start date, now.

I am going to start tracking _____________________ on _____________________. day/month/year

Each day you’ll start with the date at the top of a fresh page, and start keeping track.

What’s going to happen after the ensuing week will shock you.  You’re going to realize how much money, calories and minutes have been escaping you.  Track it for three weeks.  Yes, three weeks.  Why? Some psychologists have said that a habit doesn’t become a HABIT until after three weeks.  If you guys can do this for 21 days, and make it a habit to carry around the small notebook in your back pocket, purse, or in your backpack so you can log in everything, you’ll see a massive difference.

You’ll find yourself asking, “do I really need that back of gummy bears?” This question I asked myself last night, and without any sugar cravings, I walked straight to the entrance of my condo and went right up the elevator.  Day 3 is here!

Podcast

 

 

Darren Hardy: Everyone Has Experienced The Compound Effect

“The phenomenal power of the Compound Effect is that simple. The difference between people who employ the Compound Effect for their benefit compared to their peers who allow the same effect to work against them is almost inconceivable. It looks miraculous! Like magic or quantum leaps. After thirty-one months (or thirty-one years), the person who uses the positive nature of the Compound Effect appears to be an “overnight success.” In reality, his or her profound success was the result of small, smart choices, completed consistently over time.”

Let me break this down in incremental sub-stories.

When I was on break from college, my brother and I got into a massive argument over money.  He said, “why are you having mom pay for your phone bill? You should pay for it instead!”  From that point going forward, I became a very aggressive saver.  This is the intent of very successful people – be able to live on a little amount every month and invest/save everything away for a beautiful day.

This lead to a booking of a trip to Australia in May of 2009.  If those events hadn’t taken place in the past, I would’ve never gone to Australia to begin with.  Those small, smart choices of saving money made all the difference in the world and still continues to do so. How? Well, Malaysia, Maldives, America, Indonesia in one year says it all.  Saving had a large impact on my travels.

Another excellent example is my podcast.  Do I have millions of downloads? No.  Do I have hundreds of thousands, tens of thousands, or even thousands of downloads? Well, thousands of downloads and plays over an almost 2-year span.  A lot of people would say, “that’s not good,” but those small steps will leave a very lasting effect on everyone.  Some people think everything works instantaneously, like my blogs.  I’ve written more than 150 blogs but not that many views, likes or followers compared to others who write about politics and attract dozens of negative comments.  My intent is not about the macro, but those micro-wins will deliver macro success.

And, of course, my last story is Herbalife.  I’ve been doing it for four years and people ask me, “are you making money from it yet?”  No.  I’m doing it for my health.  If I was more aggressive, I could’ve been able to accumulate quite a bit by now, but that’s never my intent; nor is it my intent to shove endless amounts of blogs and messages down my friends throats, urging them to try it.  Again, if someone comes to me with healthy questions, I deliver.

All in all, it’s all about consistency. I will continue producing content for my YouTube and Podcast; continue writing; herbalife; and so many other things….because over a period of time, it’s going to make all the difference in the world.

Podcast

Lisa Nichols – Cultural, Economic, Gender, Geographical, Spiritual Blueprints

“To begin the process of eliminating any negative money beliefs, let’s go back through the five areas that influenced you in the first place: cultural, economic, gender, geographic, and spiritual. Take out a piece of paper and begin thinking back. What was happening in your household around money during childhood? How did your parents react to financial stressors? What did they do with their money? How did they spend it? How did they talk to you about money? Were you granted your requests for money or was there “never enough” for your needs? Were they “responsible” or “irresponsible” with their money?
And when you started earning an allowance or generating a small income from odd jobs, babysitting, or a paper route, what did you do with your money? Were your parents in agreement with your money decisions—or did they disagree with your actions?
Jot down your remembrances about money growing up—grouping your memories into the preceding five categories. Your list might look like this:”

Cultural Blueprint

  • The majority of the households in my neighborhood were on government assistance.
  • The parents were always at work, which meant the children were always engaged in activities outside their parents control.
  • The majority of my neighborhood were African Americans with the exception of a few Mexican families.
  • The two nearby complexes became saturated with gang violence.

 

Economic Blueprint

  • My father and mother both had jobs, yet the money was relatively scarce from 1995-1997.
  • The most notorious story of my life is when both my brother and I had to wear “water shoes” to school because we didn’t have enough money to buy regular shoes.
  • I would be the first one in line in 1999 (last year living with my father), at school in the morning to eat breakfast and the first one at lunch – this being because food was  a rare commodity in my household.
  • In the beginning stages of 2000, my mom would get clothes that were 5 sizes bigger than us from the homeless shelter she worked at so we wouldn’t be too cold during the winter.

 

Gender Blueprint

The only blueprint was that my sisters needed their own room because they were girls.  What Lisa Nichols wrote in her book “Abundance Now” was this…

  • My grandmother lived with us once Grandpa Joe passed on. She and my mom ran the household.•  I was very good at creating relationships with other girls, my teachers, and my neighbors.•  When I was a teenager, lots of employers offered jobs that were ideal for girls.•  My brothers teased me for getting A’s in math and science. Girls aren’t smart, they said.•  No woman in my family ever went to college. Some never graduated from high school but got married instead.”

Geographical Blueprint

  • I lived in a neighborhood where I heard gunshots at least once a week coming from “over the hill,” also named the “Westside.”
  • The bloods and crypts were around, but my siblings never got into that mess because we were more of the studious types throughout grade school.
  • My friends, in the 6th grade, would repeatedly cuss, skip class, and get bad grades.
  • My school had only Mexicans (50% were gangsters) and African Americans (60% gangsters)…..the women were already having sex at the ages of 11-13.

Middle school wasn’t difficult, though.  I’ll have to emphasize that because I had someone who left an imprint in my life my 8th grade year (story in my podcast).

Spiritual 

  • My family wasn’t very spiritual, but my mother did force us to go to church from time-to-time.  I used to pray to god every night up until about 2006-2007.

Other blueprints can be….

Our church actively helped the poor in our neighborhood with food and clothing.
•  My minister urged parishioners to tithe a portion of their paychecks every week.
•  Once, when a neighbor was too ill to work, our church members paid his rent for three months.
•  Once, when I mentioned I wanted to own a hair salon one day, my Sunday school teacher said girls should become mothers, not business owners.”

Next, circle or highlight on your list the one or two circumstances that have been the biggest driving force in your current relationship to money. Which have largely influenced your current actions and thinking around money?

In my household, for instance, small amounts received from our grandparents for birthdays or Christmas were spent as quickly as possible. As soon as we got the money, it was shopping time—and we didn’t stop until the money was all gone. I bought chili cheese dogs at the local car wash, bubble gum, candy, costume jewelry, sandals—anything fun.

I’d even treat my friends to fast food, buying them all lunch. Broke was level set. We were like lottery winners who not only spend all the money, but who are heavily in debt within a few years of receiving their winnings. I followed that pattern.
Later, I had to work hard to overcome this powerful driver. – Lisa Nichols

Podcast

Wheel of Life: Highest Average Ever!

We’re back again at my monthly wheel of life!  Again, I’ve posted this a many of times before, and this makes me realize if I have balance in my life.  The balance that’s needed to complete fulfilment.  Now, there are a couple categories that I have no control over (romantic relationships), but everything else is on complete fire at this point and I’m more than happy to write a quick blog on it; along with a podcast!

So, rate each category: health, career, wealth, physical environment, romantic relationships, fun & hobbies, family & friends, and personal development.

Here’s my podcast on how I achieved the highest average ever, but more importantly, I would love to connect with everyone who reads this blog by using figuring out where you are in each category before posting it on my Facebook page: The Arsenio Buck Show.

https://www.spreaker.com/user/thearseniobuckshow/wheel-of-life-monthly-update-highest-mar

Purposeful Relationship #3 – Linda

I love looking back on my life and figuring out what the purpose was of each relationship.  Probably not all, but one’s that left such a lasting effect on my life.

Linda Booker.  Ahhhh….just an odd afternoon at the College of Southern Nevada back in 2012 – witnessing Bruce Leroy and so many other interesting characters at a gym while advertising a clinic.  There was a lady standing by her booth giving people free water and she had some products on the table for show, but I didn’t pay any mind until the very last moments of the entire segment.

She offered us a free H2O drink (Herbalife), and being as groggy as I was at that particular moment, I certainly didn’t turn it down.  Within minutes after drinking it, I woke up and became alert in the snap of some fingers.  Full with B vitamins, she gave me a drink that changed the trajectory of the way I view health.  We exchanged contact details and went on about our day.  I kept telling her, for months, that I would go to her office and visit.  It wasn’t until the distasteful taste of a protein bar at 24 hour fitness that I realized, “maybe I should go buy protein from Linda.”

From that point going forward, she introduced me to a side business I have to this day and to products that I use for both inner and outer nutrition.

It wasn’t just the introduction to Herbalife, but I felt she was the mother I never had in terms of positivity.  At that time, for the last 2 months of my stay in America (leading up to the May 2013 departure to Thailand), my family and I had a very loud relationship where I tried staying away from them as much as possible (because of the toxicity of them).  Linda was my escape pod.  Her husband was also a father figure that I never had, either.

Sadly, Linda and I no longer speak because the purpose was fulfilled back in March of 2013.  When I finally reached Thailand, we kept in contact just for a short while until I realized we weren’t the same anymore.  I removed her from social media for about a year until I tried salvaging the relationship just a short while later.  Nope, she unfortunately lost her business and returned back to the hospital, which she resented so much.

What you have to realize people that relationships, such as the one I experienced with Linda, are called purposeful relationships.  After the purpose is met, the relationship will take a turn forever.  It won’t necessarily end, but it’ll never be the same again.

Linda, being a remarkable cancer survivor, is by far one of the best relationships I needed at that specific time in my life.  Going through a range of emotions with my potential employer (in Thailand) and my mother, it just seemed like everything was about to fall apart just shortly before my departure to Thailand.  However, this being, along with her grandparents and acquaintances, stepped in and made me realize how much life had to offer.

Thank you, Linda.  You’ve changed my life forever.

Travel Tips + Not Learning From Mistakes

I was chatting yesterday with one of students and she was completely dumbfounded at the fact that I don’t get currency before traveling.  I realized that the third time it happened, which recently came in Maldives, could’ve been the disaster of a lifetime.

Yes, maybe some of you already do so, but I’ll do a small breakdown, plus a podcast on the basic necessities in preparation for travel.

Travel Tip: 1 – Get Currency In Your Respective Country

I’m not talking bank currency with high interest rates, I’m talking about the underground places that aren’t well known.  For example, SuperRich in Thailand has the best rates in Thailand while banks such as KTB, SCB, and others are horrific in buying and selling.

Travel Tip 2: PLASTIC!

I’m not a big fan of credit cards, but in case of disasters, such as the one I experienced in Maldives a week ago, you will be saved by the bell.  I literally had to make two final purchases before my car was completely shutdown by my bank in America due to “suspicion of fraudulent charges.”

In the real world, having something marked “Visa” or “MasterCard” is your I’m-Not-Going-To-Die-Card out of any situation, but because I don’t have one, I was literally doomed.

After an array of conversations with my students yesterday, apparently going with UoB or HSBC (Hong Kong banks if I’m not mistaken), would save me a great deal of trouble.   Oh, and to throw out another example, I wouldn’t have gone through hell with Sheraton Hotels because if I had a credit card at the time of check-in, they would’ve froze my credit card’s funds which ultimately would’ve been released (compared to my debit).

Here’s the podcast from my not-learning experiences and more!

Napoleon Hill: Lesson Eight – The Habit of Doing More Than Paid For

A man is most efficient and will more quickly and easily succeed when engaged in work that he loves, or work that he performs in behalf of some person whom he loves.

Here’s the introduction to one of the most important, life-long lessons that so many of you probably lack in life.  Here’s one of the best stories of my life.

In late 2015, I was approached by my boss at my respective job.  She had already set up some conversation/presentation workshops, which I ran accordingly.  Because it was a massive success, students began to ask about developing a conversation course.

A lot of teachers, especially those historical British teachers, don’t believe in conversation as a tool of success; nor do they approve it as a course.  I had to constantly battle and take a lot of slack from people saying, “this isn’t an academic course,” but confidence is the ultimate success tool for communication, right?

After shrugging off a lot of meaningless comments and naysayers, my boss gave me the green light to create a course using some books and materials.  So, I did.

Step Number 1: You Will Take Losses In The Beginning, But The Returns Are Unbelievable

Because the conversation course had a 2$ less payout, 95% of the teachers refused it at the beginning.  I was adamant and infuriated because  some teachers, who would’ve done a good job teaching conversation, didn’t want to teach it because they didn’t get the full amount in the beginning.

I laughed about this because I had already read about “doing more than what you’re paid for,” and I knew it would come back and bite them.  Went work got scarce, they came crawling back trying to accept any class that was thrown at them and I said NO. You denied it in the beginning; however, now that work is slow, you want to cover your ass? Ugh, not today.

I, being the lead person of this course, had to formulate a group of teachers, a couple of which failed to deliver the expectations because of their lackadaisical teaching.  You don’t necessarily have to have the gift of the gab, but you have to love teaching.  A lot of teachers in Thailand don’t give a damn about teaching.

After weeding out the foolishness and the incompetence, I created a course, through persistence and little pay, that generated millions of baht over the course of the year.  I made shy, timid students – absolute stars in this respective area.

Get this, creating a course that has generated millions….I only received 0.00005% of that.  However, now I have a podcast, which was created at the same time, that’s listened to over 70 countries.  I did far more than what I was paid to do, but the law of increasing returns returned in the grandest of fashions.  This is how life works.

Podcast

Express Inn at Hulhumale, Maldives – The Lady That Changed My Life Forever!

Buckle up — because this is going to be a life-changing blog.

Man, oh man.  I’m still trying to figure out exactly what took place yesterday.  Here, if you guys don’t want to read, here’s the podcast….and I’ll write what happened, on top of some things you need to know if you travel to Male, Maldives.

Let’s just say that when I came here, I was unable to obtain any currency.  No Maldivian Rupiah is made available for anyone.  I tried selling my Thai baht at the airport and they simply said, “we don’t accept it.”

I replied, “guys, I have no other money. I tried using my US bank card at the ATM and it didn’t work!  He said, “I’m sorry.  That’s the only way you can get money.”

After following that, my bank got 3 suspicious transactions and restricted my card immediately, so I had to use an app to call back to America and explain the situation.  20 minute conversation lead to a wonderful assistant telling me, “listen, you have only two transactions left that you can use.  We will block your card and send you a new one.”

I said, “omg, could you stay on the line so I can buy an Air Asia ticket for tomorrow to head back home?”  She followed suit, along with me paying for my hotel and that was the end.  My what was suppose to be three day trip to the ultra-gorgeous island named Maldives was coming to a horrific stop in just 24 hours –  all because I couldn’t get Maldivian currency with my Thai Baht or USD.

After buying and sorting everything out, I sat seaside watching kids run around and play; jet skis flying at high-speeds in the distance, wonderful people swimming out to a platform 50 meters off the shore so they can run around on the platform.  Myself? Wound on my leg that was continuing to fester, developing into something much scarier, drowned in my sorrows while putting my hands atop my head thinking, “why me?”  All I wanted to do was come here and have an incredible holiday.

The Turning Point

A Bangladeshi gentleman who works at the front desk invited me for dinner…on him.  It was 7pm and I fell asleep because I wasn’t hungry.  I was in REM when I heard some door knocks and a man speaking outside.  I knew it was him, so I jumped out of bed, opened the door and he was heading downstairs saying, “don’t worry, food and everything is paid for.”

I said, “huh?”

He said, “we’re taking care of you. Come downstairs.”

I said, “man, I’m just going to get some sleep.”

He insisted, “come downstairs.”

And so I did.  I went outside and there was the woman who I first shook hands with at the airport.  The events that followed are events that I’ll be telling for the rest of my life.  Podcast down below.

Would You Take A Million Dollars For What You Have?

There was a man a long time ago who was walking in his loathe; completely destroyed and disinterested in life because his family-owned shop completely failed.  He was on his way to the bank to see if he can acquire some money so that he can move to another city to find a “job” until something happened in the middle of the street that changed his life forever.

Back in 1934 there weren’t wheelchairs like there are today.  This man, who had no legs, was trying to make his way across the street with slabs of wood on each side of his body.  Suddenly, both the loather and the wheelchair man locked eyes and the disabled man said, “well, how you doing today, sir? Fine day, isn’t it?”

As this man, who went by the name of Harold Abbott, stood there looking at this man…he realized how rich he was.  He had two legs and he could walk.  He felt ashamed and self-pity.  Later, he made an oath to himself that he would be happy, cheerful, and confident.  Ultimately he went to the bank and doubled up on the money he originally wanted to ask – getting the money in full.  He then moved away and got the job….all because of that incident.

He wrote on the mirror of his home, “I had the blues because I had no shoes. Until upon the street, I met a man who had no feet.”

Why don’t you stop right now and ask yourself: “What in the hell am I worrying about?” In life, about 90% of the things are right and 10% is wrong.  Instead of making that 10% wrong seem like 90%, how about focusing on the 90% that is right?

There are people on the planet today searching for a meal everyday, but you…yes, YOU, have the luxury of reading this particular blog.  This particular sentence.  That’s a luxury in it’s own.  Have you eaten today? Do you have family and reliable friends? Do you have arms, legs, and feet? Then what the hell are you complaining about?

Podcast down below for the stories!