Rich Dad Poor Dad | S5 – E50 | Lesson VIII | Teach & You Shall receive – The power of giving

If I could leave one single idea with you, it is that idea. Whenever you feel short or in need of something, give what you want first and it will come back in buckets. That is true for money, a smile, love, or friendship. I know it is often the last thing a person may want to do, but it has always worked for me. I trust that the principle of reciprocity is true, and I give what I want. I want money, so I give money, and it comes back in multiples. I want sales, so I help someone else sell something, and sales come to me. I want contacts, and I help someone else get contacts. Like magic, contacts come to me. I heard a saying years ago that went: “God does not need to receive, but humans need to give.”

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If you need money, help people receive money. If you need coaches or people to join your podcast, refer others over to your friends platforms. Need a new job? Help others get jobs. This is how the compound effect works.

Often just the process of thinking of what I want, and how I could give that to someone else, breaks free a torrent of bounty. Whenever I feel that people aren’t smiling at me, I simply begin smiling and saying hello. Like magic, the next thing I know I’m surrounded by smiling people. It is true that your world is only a mirror of you.

So that’s why I say, “Teach, and you shall receive.” I have found that the more I teach those who want to learn, the more I learn. If you want to learn about money, teach it to someone else. A torrent of new ideas and finer distinctions will come in.

There are times when I have given and nothing has come back, or what I have received is not what I wanted. But upon closer inspection and soul searching, I was often giving to receive in those instances, instead of giving for the joy that giving itself brings.

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Rich Dad Poor Dad | S5 – E48 | Lesson VIII | Steps to Develop Your Powers #6 Use Assets to Buy Luxuries

A friend’s child has been developing a nasty habit of burning a hole in his pocket. Just 16, he wanted his own car. The excuse: “All his friends’ parents gave their kids cars.” The child wanted to go into his savings and use it for a down payment. That was when his father called me and then came to see me.

“Do you think I should let him do it, or should I just buy him a car?”

I answered, “It might relieve the pressure in the short term, but what have you taught him in the long term? Can you use this desire to own a car and inspire your son to learn something?” Suddenly the lights went on, and he hurried home.

Two months later I ran into my friend again. “Does your son have his new car?” I asked.

“No, he doesn’t. But I gave him $3,000 for the car. I told him to use my money instead of his college money.”

“Well, that’s generous of you,” I said.
“Not really. The money came with a hitch.”

As I said earlier, if a person cannot master the power of self- discipline, it is best not to try to get rich. I say this because, although the process of developing cash flow from an asset column is easy in theory, what’s hard is the mental fortitude to direct money to the correct use. Due to external temptations, it is much easier in today’s consumer world to simply blow money out the expense column. With weak mental fortitude, that money flows into the paths of
least resistance. That is the cause of poverty and financial struggle.

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RICH DAD POOR DAD | S5 – E45 | LESSON VII | OVERCOMING Arrogance

“What I know makes me money. What I don’t know loses me money. Every time I have been arrogant, I have lost money. Because when I’m arrogant, I truly believe that what I don’t know is not important,” rich dad would often tell me.

I have found that many people use arrogance to try to hide their own ignorance. It often happens when I am discussing financial statements with accountants or even other investors.

They try to bluster their way through the discussion. It is clear to me that they don’t know what they’re talking about. They’re not lying, but they are not telling the truth.

There are many people in the world of money, finances, and investments who have absolutely no idea what they’re talking about. Most people in the money industry are just spouting off sales pitches like used-car salesmen. When you know you are ignorant in a subject, start educating yourself by finding an expert in the field or a book on the subject.

Rich Dad Poor Dad | S5 – E27 | Lesson V | The CASHFLOW GAME

Just like a board game, the world is always providing us with instant feedback. We could learn a lot if we tuned in more. One day not long ago, I complained to my wife that the cleaners must have shrunk my pants. My wife gently smiled and poked me in the stomach to inform me that the pants had not shrunk. Something else had expanded—me!

The CASHFLOW game was designed to give every player personal feedback. Its purpose is to give you options. If you draw the boat card and it puts you into debt, the question is: “Now what can you do? How many different financial options can you come up with?” That is the purpose of the game: to teach players to think and create new and various financial options. Thousands of people throughout the world have played this game. The players who get out of the Rat Race the quickest are the people who understand numbers and have creative financial minds. They recognize different financial options. Rich people are often creative and take calculated risks. People who take the longest are people who are not familiar with numbers and often do not understand the power of investing.

What did you learn about your true behavior from playing the game

Some people playing CASHFLOW gain lots of money in the game, but they don’t know what to do with it. Even though they have money, everyone else seems to be getting ahead of them. And that is true in real life. There are a lot of people who have a lot of money and do not
get ahead financially.

I have watched people playing CASHFLOW complain that the right opportunity cards are not coming their way. So they sit there. I know people who do that in real life. They wait for the right opportunity.

I have watched people get the right opportunity card and then not have enough money. Then they complain that they would have gotten out of the Rat Race if they had had more money. So they sit there. I know people in real life who do that also. They see all the great deals, but they have no money.

And I have seen people pull a great opportunity card, read it out loud, and have no idea that it is a great opportunity. They have the money, the time is right, they have the card, but they can’t see the opportunity staring them in the face. They fail to see how it fits into their financial plan for escaping the Rat Race. And I know more people like that than all the others combined. Most people have an opportunity of a lifetime flash right in front of them, and they fail to see it. A year later, they find out about it, after everyone else got rich.

Financial intelligence is simply having more options. If the opportunities aren’t coming your way, what else can you do to improve your financial position? If an opportunity lands in your lap and you have no money and the bank won’t talk to you, what else can you do to get the opportunity to work in your favor? If your hunch is wrong, and what you’ve been counting on doesn’t happen, how can you turn a lemon into millions? That is financial intelligence. It is not so much what happens, but how many different financial solutions you can think of to turn a lemon into millions. It is how creative you are in solving financial problems.

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Rich Dad Poor Dad | S5 – E26 | Lesson V | The Rich Invent Money

Once we leave school, most of us know that it is not so much a matter of college degrees or good grades that count. In the real world outside of academics, something more than just grades is required.
I have heard it called many things; guts, chutzpah, balls, audacity, bravado, cunning, daring, tenacity, and brilliance. This factor, whatever it is labeled, ultimately decides one’s future much more than school grades do.

Inside each of us is one of these brave, brilliant, and daring characters. There is also the flip side of that character: people who could get down on their knees and beg if necessary. After a year in Vietnam as a Marine Corps pilot, I got to know both of those characters inside of me intimately. One is not better than the other.

Yet as a teacher, I recognized that it was excessive fear and self-doubt that were the greatest detractors of personal genius. It broke my heart to see students know the answers, yet lack the courage to act on the answer. Often in the real world, it’s not the smart who get ahead, but the bold.

In my personal experience, your financial genius requires both technical knowledge as well as courage. If fear is too strong, the genius is suppressed. In my classes, I strongly urge students to learn
to take risks, to be bold, and to let their genius convert that fear into power and brilliance. It works for some and just terrifies others. I have come to realize that for most people, when it comes to the subject of money, they would rather play it safe. I have had to field questions such as: “Why take risks?” “Why should I bother developing my financial IQ?” “Why should I become financially literate?” And I answer, “Just to have more options.”

So why bother developing your financial IQ? No one can answer that but you. Yet I can tell you why I myself do it. I do it because it
is the most exciting time to be alive. I’d rather be welcoming change than dreading change. I’d rather be excited about making millions than worrying about not getting a raise. This period we are in now is a most exciting time, unprecedented in our world’s history. Generations from now, people will look back at this period of time and remark at what an exciting era it must have been. It was the death of the old and birth of the new. It was full of turmoil, and it was exciting.

So why bother developing your financial IQ? Because if you do, you will prosper greatly. And if you don’t, this period of time will be a frightening one. It will be a time of watching some people move boldly forward while others cling to worn-out life preservers.

Rich Dad Poor Dad | S5 – E23 | Lesson IV | The History of Taxes & The Power of Corporations

I remember in school being told the story of Robin Hood and
his Merry Men. My teacher thought it was a wonderful story of a romantic hero who robbed from the rich and gave to the poor. My rich dad did not see Robin Hood as a hero. He called Robin Hood a crook.

Robin Hood may be long gone, but his followers live on. I often still hear people say, “Why don’t the rich pay for it?” or “The rich should pay more in taxes and give it to the poor.”

It is this Robin Hood fantasy, or taking from the rich to give to the poor, that has caused the most pain for the poor and the middle class. The reason the middle class is so heavily taxed is because of the Robin Hood ideal. The reality is that the rich are not taxed. It’s the middle class, especially the educated upper-income middle class, who pays for the poor.

Again, to understand fully how things happen, we need to look at the history of taxes. Although my highly educated dad was an expert on the history of education, my rich dad fashioned himself as an expert on the history of taxes.

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Rich Dad Poor Dad | S5 – E11 | Assets vs. Liabilities | Cash-flow Pattern of an Asset

Rich dad believed in the KISS principle—Keep It Simple, Stupid (or Keep It Super Simple)—so he kept it simple for us, and that made our financial foundation strong.

So what causes the confusion? How could something so simple be so screwed up? Why would someone buy an asset that was really a liability? The answer is found in basic education.

We focus on the word “literacy” and not “financial literacy.” What defines something to be an asset or a liability are not words. In fact, if you really want to be confused, look up the words “asset”

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An asset puts money in my pocket. A liability takes money out of my pocket.

and “liability” in the dictionary. I know the definition may sound good to a trained accountant, but for the average person, it makes no sense. But we adults are often too proud to admit that something does not make sense.

To us young boys, rich dad said, “What defines an asset are not words, but numbers. And if you can’t read the numbers, you can’t tell an asset from a hole in the ground.” “In accounting,” rich dad would say, “it’s not the numbers, but what the numbers are telling you. It’s just like words. It’s not the words, but the story the words are telling you.”

“If you want to be rich, you’ve got to read and understand numbers.” If I heard that once, I heard it a thousand times from my rich dad. And I also heard, “The rich acquire assets, and the poor and middle class acquire liabilities.”

Here is how to tell the difference between an asset and a liability. Most accountants and financial professionals do not agree with
the definitions, but these simple drawings were the start of strong financial foundations for two young boys.

Positive Mental Attitude: Season 2 – Episode 8 – Habit of Saving Revamped

“The principle he learned and the one that you also can employ will now be stated in a very few words. In reading The Richest Man in Babylon, Mr. Osborn found that wealth could be acquired if you:

(a) Just save one dime out of every dollar you earn;

(b) Each six months, invest your savings and interest or dividend returns from these savings and investments; and

(c) When you invest, seek expert advice on safe investments and thus you won’t gamble and lose your principal.”

Excerpt From: Napoleon Hill. “Success Through A Positive Mental Attitude.” iBooks. https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/success-through-a-positive-mental-attitude/id381618319?mt=11

Oh, yes! The habit of saving, one of the best kept secrets and a principle I went over quite some time ago.  Guys, it was July 3rd, 2017….my brother (as most negative stories from my childhood revolve around him) came home and was yelling at me.  He said I was selfish (although I was a poor college student) because I was allowing my mother to pay for my phone bill.  I remember crying and leaving to my best friend’s girlfriends’ house — Dominique.  The next day we watched Transformers (the original motion picture) before going to a fourth of July party in the evening — where my brother actually greeted me with a handshake — acting as if nothing had taken place a day before.

Over the next year I stood up to him gradually….but all arguments and problems between 2005-2013 stemmed over money.  Either I wasn’t giving my mom enough money, or I should get a job.  From that point going forward, I was an aggressive saver.

Of course this doesn’t relate to investing, but I became self-aware that being broke, was not fun. Yes, I had $10 to my name at one point here in Thailand, but never again was I ever that broke again.

You have to be consciously aware of your spending.  In my Darren Hardy blogs, I emphasized how you can curb your spending or just be aware of how much you’re spending.  I always put myself on a daily budget.  Thankfully I’m working hard throughout everyday; therefore, I don’t have time to buy things I crave (carbing up with pizza or pancakes).  Also, I follow a routine every morning.  I have a fried egg, rice, and chicken (stir-fried basil)….so I’m constantly aware of how much I spend everyday.

Guys, I can’t stress enough how important it is to save.  In my podcast I give you some stories that ultimately lead me to saving.