Darren Hardy: Daily Rhythms & Registering Them + Relationships

Preston Smiles fits “fun-time” into his clients’ schedules.

What’s fun-time?

It’s simply when an alarm goes off, that particular individual drops everything he or she is doing and they dance their tail off.  I know, odd as hell, but the incorporation of that, or any other behavior, forms a discipline.

Remember I talked to you about Romanic Relationships and how spontaneity would go a long way in any relationship? Look at it this way…

Darren Hardy, at 6pm, has something called “date night” with his wife.  So when the time arrives, the alarms go off on his spouse and his phone, they drop everything, and they commit to being with each other from sundown — all the way to sunup.  This is from Friday night to Sunday morning, too.  Not just one day.

He also used an idea from Jack Canfield’s ‘Success Principles’ book, which he asks his wife, “how would you rate the relationship for this past week?” Of course the wife would give him a number, and he would then ask, “how can I get better?”  The wife will then come up with a list of things that will help him become better.

No one is perfect.  Just remember that.  It would be so overwhelming hearing nagging (which it shouldn’t be – but totally can be) all the time.  For example, when I was recently dating a girl, she wouldn’t ask me something like this; nor would I ask her the question.  Instead, on a two-hour trip back from Kanchanaburi to Bangkok, she was complaining her head off because I didn’t ask her if she wanted anything from 7-11, and because I didn’t carry all four pieces of luggage.

This should be a feeling of validation for both parties.

“Every month, Georgia and I also schedule something unique and memorable. Jim Rohn taught me that life is simply a collection of experiences; our goal should be to increase the frequency and the intensity of the good experiences. Once a month we try to do something that creates an experience that has some memorable intensity. It could be driving up to the mountains, going on an adventurous hike, driving up to Los Angeles to try a new fancy restaurant, going sailing in the bay—whatever. Something out of the ordinary that has a heightened experience and creates an indelible memory.”

“Once a quarter we plan a two- to three-day getaway. I like to do a quarterly review of all my goals and life patterns, and this is a great time to do a deeper check-in on how things are going in our relationship. Then we have our special travel vacation, plus our holiday traditions and our New Year’s hike and goal-setting ritual. You can see that once all this is scheduled, you no longer have to think about what you need to be doing. Everything happens naturally. We’ve created a rhythm that gives us momentum.” – Darren Hardy

Weekly Rhythm Registration In Podcast + PDF

Registering Rhythms Example

The Eight Guidelines For Creating Effective Affirmations

To be effective, your affirmations should be constructed using the following nine guidelines:

  1. Start with the words I am. The words I am are the two most powerful words in the language.  The subconscious takes any sentence that starts with I am and interprets it as a command – a directive to make it happen.
  2. Use the present tense.  Describe what you want as though you already have it, as thought it is already accomplished.

Wrong: I’m going to go to Mongolia.

Right: I’m enjoying these frigid temperatures in Mongolia right now.

3. State it in the positive.  Afford that you want, now what you don’t want.  State your affirmations in the positive.  The unconscious does not hear the words no, or not.  This means that the statement “Don’t slam the door is heard as “Slam the door.”  The phrase “I am no longer afraid of flying” evokes an image of being afraid of flying, while the phrase “I am enjoying the thrill of flying” evokes an image of enjoyment.

4. Keep it brief.  Think of your affirmation as an advertising jingle.  Act as if each word costs $1,000.  It needs to be short enough and memorable enough to be easily remembered.

5.  Make it specific.  Vague affirmations produce vague results.  Remember what I said on my podcast about the woman who said, “I want a lot of money.”  Well, a lot of money can be a quarter.  The universe needs specificity to deliver the specified results.

Wrong: I am driving my new red sports car.

Right: I am driving my new red Porsche 911.

6.  Include an action word ending with -ing.  This is the present continuous that I teach so much about.  The continuous form indicates that it’s happening now.  Stay away from future conditionals such as I want, I will, if only, I would.

7.  Include at least one dynamic emotion of feeling word.  Include the emotional state you would be feeling if you had already achieved it.  I’m talking the adverbs: calmly, peacefully, delighted ,enthusiastically lovingly.

8. Make affirmations for yourself, not others.  Make them describe your behaviour, not the behavior of others.

Wrong: I am watching Johnny clean up his room.

Right: I am effectively communicating my needs and desires to Johnny.

Jack Canfield – Chunk It Down

The secret of getting ahead is getting started.  The secret of getting started is breaking your complex, overwhelming tasks into small, manageable tasks, and then starting on the first one. – Mark Twain

Sometimes our biggest life goals seem so overwhelming.  We rarely see them as a series of small, achievable tasks.  However, if we can break down larger goals into achievable tasks and accomplish them one at a time…that’s how the macro win is achieved.

One of the first and most important ways to begin chunking it down is by consulting people who are already where you want to be and ask them about the steps they had to take.  With their area of expertise, it will allow you to maneuver around the storms and avoid the traps.

Another way is by buying some type of book, manual, or even looking at instructional videos on YouTube that outline the process, like monetizing your own YouTube content.  I learned how to do that within 10 minutes.

A good way is to start from he end and look backwards.  Close your eyes and imagine having already achieved the goal…then just look back and see what you had to do to get where you now are.

Mind Mapping

This is definitely the most powerful process for creating that to-do list that outlines your goal.  It helps you figure out all the information you’ll need to gather, who you will need to talk to, what small steps you’ll need to take, how much money you’ll need to earn or raise, which deadlines you’ll need to meet, and so on.

Just imagine the mind map this way….massive center circle in the middle of the page – in this case, Podcast.

The outer circles would be divided into major categories and tasks I would’ve need to accomplish to achieve the greater goal.  What’s the name of my podcast? Topics? Audience? Necessary equipment? Schedule? Money?

The spokes, which are the lines that you would draw on the side of the outer circles to indicate extra information, would be labeled.

Here’s my podcast both on spreaker and youtube so my tribe can listen in to what I’m saying!

Podcast – https://www.spreaker.com/episode/8496585

Podcast on YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbmHi1iCMGo

 

 

 

 

 

Jack Canfield – Master The Technology You Need

“Technology is supposed to make our lives easier, allowing us to do things more quickly and efficiently.  But too often it seems to make things harder, leaving us with fifty-button remote controls, digital cameras with hundreds of mysterious features, and cars with dashboard systems worth of the space shuttle.” – James Surowiecki

I want to be abundantly clear about how technology works.  When it comes to the gadgets, use them instead of it using you.

7-Day Technology Turnaround

Make a list of your technology annoyances.  I’m talking waking up and staying glued to your phone when you can be much more productive.  Most people have their phones bedside when they go to sleep and it’s the first thing they pick up in the morning.  That’s considered to be an annoyance.

On top of that – TV’s.  Most Americans spend so much time watching TV everyday.  For example, sports enthusiasts on Sunday could sit in front of the TV for up to 9 hours watching artificial events on TV.

Compile your list.  Once you do so, begin tackling the cleanup process.  Example, charge your phone outside your bedroom and put an alarm clock on within your bedroom – set the time, too, for when you want to wake up.

Limit yourself to TV hours.  I’m talking about writing down how many hours you actually watch TV a day and begin taking an hour off as time goes on. Take the micro steps, not macro.

Look at any other annoyances that hinder your production in the morning and the evening.

I know some people can’t even go shopping, out to dinner, or on vacation without their cell phones going off.  I’ve seen people in 5 different countries who sit at restaurants while tapping their phone and not conversing amongst each other.  This trend is growing worldwide.

In addition to annoyances, let’s talk about the low-information diet.  How many of you turn on the news every morning within the first hour of your day? A lot of people would say, “I need to be informed,” but you don’t have to be INUNDATED!

What are your feelings after watching the news? When you get to work, what’s the topic of discussion every morning? Does it revolve around how productive you were, or something that happened over night.  Car crashes, robberies, politics, natural disasters?

Try not turning on the NEWS for once in the morning and see how you feel when you get to work.  Instead of bringing up “circle of concern” type conversations, bring up something you’re grateful for or looking forward to.

Michael Bernard Beckwith once said, “you’re going to have to taking some heavy digestive enzymes to digest what you see on TV.  Instead of watching television, how about “tell a vision.”

Podcast –  https://www.spreaker.com/episode/9626352