Interviewee #20 – Perry Power – The Art of Storytelling

With a history of sexual abuse and losing his father just over a year ago, Perry has managed to use these dark times and turn it into lightness in order to inspire others to do the same. Believing that our ‘mess is our message’, Perry walks us through how we each have a unique story and hidden power, which we need to find in order to become the best version of ourselves.

Get in touch with Perry Power of the UK

– About the art of storytelling.

 

Links:

 

Things we discussed:

  • Introduction by Perry Power.
  • How Perry started it all?
  • Sharing about Perry’s childhood.
  • Deciding to talk about sexual abuse.
  • Sharing about dark times in an individual’s life.
  • Talking about a man’s ego.
  • Sharing your grief.
  • Talking about struggles in life.
  • The power of being vulnerable.
  • Talking about anger.
  • Sharing about how to shift a mindset about being yourself.
  • Talked about his first FB video.
  • The power of sharing.
  • The power of storytelling.
  • How you tell your story.
  • How old were you when you first started personal development?
  • What did personal development teach you?
  • Hate and forgiveness.
  • Talking about your history of sexual abuse.
  • You need some chapters to your storytelling.
  • The defining moment in your life and in your storytelling.
  • Perfecting your storytelling.
  • You need a flow like a slide in your storytelling.
  • What do you want to accomplish and what are you building?

 

 

Thank you for listening!

 

Thank you so much for joining me for this podcast. Please do write down some feedbacks and comments. Please do share this podcast on your social media.

 

Links:

 

Traveling Pod: Episode 6 – From Hell To Heaven!

Double check-ins, as mentioned before (at Don Meung International in Bangkok, Thailand), had some stereotypical treatment to them.  Yeah, already mentioned.  Then there was the delay turned almost mid-air collision with not one, but two other aircrafts.  I saw it with my own eyes.  We were ascending and we flew directly under a Singapore Airlines jumbo with another private passerby zooming the opposite direction, coming maybe 2km from both planes.  I’ve never seen anything like it.  Such a vast sky but Air Traffic Control failed miserably at this.  Terrifying experience and none of the passengers knew what was happening.

Anywho, landed and immigration presented me with a 45-minute wait, pushing back an anticipated meeting with my content writer.  After the nice officer cleared me, I ran to the Express train that connects the airports with the city center.  After that, I went to 7-11 (due to starvation) before making a six-station trek to my hotel which I was abruptly greeted by loud ass music at the base of a 100$ USD a night hotel?! Checked in, and of course, card was denied.  I said, “man, this is going to get worse.”  During the “denial” process, my content writer called and said she couldn’t wait for me any longer.  Great!

In the end, it was approached, finally, and I went upstairs, sleepily, not wanting to go anywhere and that was day 1.  Definitely one of the worst travel days in history, but then, I knew what was going to follow.

Just one more snippet, and then heaven.

After waking up and feeling like complete ass, I knew I needed to head to the train station to meet my friend, Hakeem Khan, who’s a fitness entrepreneur in Kuala Lumpur.  I didn’t forget, but I failed to go out and get a sim card in the night, resulting in me waiting and using wifi at the Sentral Station.  I plead to Hakeem and told him, “meet me there at 10:45!” So then there it went…I got to the station about 45 minutes later and he wasn’t there.  I was scratching my head, and then put a stop-loss on worry: “he has 10 minutes or I’m going back home.” I gave him five…I bought a ticket and went to the opposite side of the tracks, waiting patiently with my palm on my forehead, for the train.

I glanced over the railway for some odd reason and I saw someone waving their helmet.  IT WAS HIM! I began to fun up the stairs, and at the same time, I was telling myself, “ummm, what excuse can I come up with at that moment to tell him what I was doing.”  We laughed it off in the end, and then heaven broke through.

Heaven, come to me, baby!

I took a taxi to his gym, and boy, was I blown away! A 22-year-old with a gym like that? Loads of equipment inside, nice set up, a place where he does all of his videos, and in a nice, university section of Sham Alah.

I was on 4 hours of sleep from the night before, basically because a terrible hotel, but that didn’t stop him from getting the best out of me or me getting the best out of him.  The podcast was sensational, followed by Nandos (Portuguese chicken restaurant) and lots of funny stories.  After that was all done, I went back to my hotel in the evening and was greeted with some extraordinary news.

What I’ve been envisioning is teaching at a bank Mon-Fri in the morning.  I got a message with the other person stating they have another project from the same bank they want to give me.

I’m just so grateful for everything. I find myself in gratitude a heck of a lot more than before because everything I’ve been through was because of this moment.  This moment right here.

And so, here I am at the airport getting ready to take a flight back to Thailand….and I’ll be back in 17 days, too.

Stay tuned!

Questions & Answers: How Did I Develop My Strength/What Makes You Different From Your Brother?

Wonderful question came in today from a friend in Japan asking something very deep – something I somewhat covered in my last podcast.  So, here are the questions.

Where do you get your strength from?

I lived in Australia for one year.  I thought I was ostricized by society.  There were days I thought I was depressed and told my housemate, “no one likes me here.”

She retorter, “you have a beautiful personality! Don’t worry about others!”  Of course all I did at the time was watch the secret.  There was no Les Brown, Lisa Nichols, MindValley, Tom Bilyeu, or any of these other entrepreneurs, speakers and massive business titans.  I didn’t know the process in terms of bio-hacking the mind.  So throughout my stint in Australia, I had to learn the hard way.  I had a fair-weather friend named Thayanna who ended up disappearing mid-way through the way.  There was no “best friend” from Arizona, just like  there wasn’t in October of 2014 (later story) and last year.  I then realized throughout everything I experienced in Australia…my mother, with a simple comment, pretty much told me that there was no quitting.

“So you’re complaining about life there? If you come back….then what? I don’t have a place for you to stay.  Tina is living here.  You don’t know what to do.”

Basically I can go on and on about that text message but she pretty much gave me a big “f*** you” and “there’s no room for you at the house anymore.”  It was like the disownment I needed.  The “build your courage now or you’re homeless” type of motivation.  And from then on….I never gave up — and a seed was born within me.

Podcast

Some Stories On How You Can Conquer Worry – Dale Carnegie Excerpt

Six major troubles hit me all at once.

  1. My business college was trembling on the verge of financial disaster because all the boys were going to war; and most of the girls were making more money working in war plants without training than my graduates could make in business offices with training.
  2. My older son was in service, and I had the heart-numbing worry coming to all parents whose sons were away at war.
  3. Oklahoma City had already started proceedings to condemn a large track of land for an airport, and my home – formerly my father’s home – was located in the center of this tract.  I knew that I would be paid only one tenth of its value.
  4. The water well on my property went dry because a drainage canal had been dug near my home.  To dig a new well would be throwing five hundred dollars away because the land was already being condemned.  I had to carry water to my livestock in buckets every morning for two months, and I feared I would have to continue it during the rest of the war.
  5. I lived ten miles away from my business school and had a class B gasoline card: that meant I couldn’t buy any new tires, so I worried about how I could ever get to work when the super annotated tired on my old Ford gave up the ghost.
  6. My oldest daughter had graduated form high school  year ahead of schedule.  She had her heart set on going to college, and I just didn’t have the money to send her.  I knew her heart would be broken.

This specific individual went on to say that one afternoon while sitting in his office, worrying about his worries, he decided to write them all down for it seemed no one ever had more to worry about than he had.  He could do nothing to solve them.  So he decided to write them down and file them away.  Months went on and he had forgotten that the list even existed.  Eighteen months later he went through his files and there was the list that he wrote 1.5 years earlier.  Well, the problems solved themselves.

  1. I saw that all my worries about having to close my business college had been useless because the government had started paying business schools for training veterans and my school was soon filled to capacity.
  2.  I saw that all my worries about my son in service had been useless; he was coming through the war without a scratch.
  3.  I saw that all my worries about my land being condemned for use as an airport and been useless because oil had been struck within a mile of my farm and the cost of procuring the land for an airport thad become prohibitive.
  4. I saw that all my worries about having no well to water my stock had been also useless because, as soon as I knew my land would not be condemned, I spent my money necessary to dig a new well.
  5. I recapped my tires and managed how to survive.
  6. Sixty days before opening of college, I was offered – almost like a miracle – an auditioning job which I could do outside of school hours, and this job made it possible for me to send her to college on schedule.

I can turn myself into a shouting optimist within an hour!

One man said when he found himself depressed over his present conditions, he would, within an hour, banish worry and turn himself into an optimism.  How?

He read 20th century history for about an hour.  After that happened, he realized that bad as conditions were at the moment, they were infinitely better than they used to be.  This enabled him to see and face his present troubles in a much more proper perspective, as well as to realize that the world as a whole is constantly growing better.

Here is a method that deserves a whole chapter.  Read history! Try to get the viewpoint of ten thousand years – and see how trivial YOUR troubles are, in terms of eternity!

I was terribly depressed at one moment, and when I was, I forced myself to become physically active almost every hour of the day.  I played five or six sets of violent games of tennis every morning, then took a bath, had lunch, and played eighteen holes of golf every afternoon.  On Friday nights, I danced until one o’clock in the morning.  I am a great believer in working up a tremendous sweat.  I found that depression and worry oozed out of my system with the sweat.

Physical activity – which can involve any type of strenuous activity, allows you to take your mind off the present.

I am a great dismisser

When I turn from one task to another, I dismiss all thoughts of the problems I had been thinking about previously.  I find it stimulating and refreshing to turn from one activity to another.  It rests me.  It clears my mind.

I have had to school myself to dismiss all these problems from my mind when I close my office desk.  They are always continuing.  Each one always has a set of unsolved problems demanding my attention.  If I carried these issues home with me each night, and worried about them, I would destroy my health; and, in addition, I would destroy all ability to cope with them.

I was committing slow suicide because I didn’t know how to relax.

I used to rush through life in high gear.  I was always tense, never relaxed.  I arrived home from work every night worried and exhausted from nervous fatigue.  Why? Because no one ever said, “Paul, you’re killing yourself!”

Every since then I have practiced relaxation.  When I go to bed at night, I don’t try to go to sleep until I’ve consciously relaxed my body and my breathing.  And now I wake up in the morning rested – a big improvement, because I used to wake up in the morning tired and tense.  I relax and now when I eat and when I drive.

Podcast

https://www.spreaker.com/user/thearseniobuckshow/some-stories-on-how-you-can-conquer-worr