My First Tedx – Rundown & Notes

So, today marked the first day of doing my first ever Tedx on my podcast.  Here are some notes.

Separation

I’m trying to create a timeline from the beginning, preface, worst month, the overcoming, and then the resilience.

For example, I started it off with a visualization exercise which pinpointed that sever racial issues that plague this country.  This literally puts people into my state of awarness and make them view the world through my eyes.  This captures the audience (remember I told you about props before) instantaneously and now I have them in the palm of my hand.  After this process, they’re locked in and feel the raw emotion of what I felt.

After that, I pointed out some of the biggest problems I had.  The night I went home and slammed my arms on my bed, weeping.  Seeing the comments: “ewww, black man! Low-class! Pimp!” — and ultimately leading into the darkest month of my life.  I want this to be a journey, bringing people into the catacombs of what I went through.

The goal for a Tedx is what can the audience take from the Tedx? What can you give them? What can disrupt their biochemistry along the way? What could, and will be their breakthrough? That’s what came in the second half of my talk.

Comment From A Teacher

This was the changing point when a teacher, who I used to work with, told me, “Arsenio, you need to utilize all your skills.  You have a radio voice.  Create a podcast.”  I asked him what should the podcast be about and he said, “you’ll figure it out.”

Little did I know my story was being created after all those years, ultimately converting it into a podcast with personal development after a botched trip to Singapore.

Yes, there were still some problems along the way and some racial tensions, but they subsided after I started feeding my mind with texts that have been written in the last 100 years.  That was the beginning.

Would love to hear your feedback in my podcast down below!

https://www.spreaker.com/user/thearseniobuckshow/arsenio-bucks-tedx-round-1-untitled

Tedx – What To Wear

In my personal opinion, what you wear means everything on-stage.  I was referred a Tedx video by one of my colleagues, and although he did crack a few jokes, I couldn’t take his appearance.  He was wearing about 5 different colors, spoke extremely fast, and had one of the most awkward stances I’ve seen on stage.  You just can’t look ridiculous.

On the other hand, there was this video.

Now, this attire is completely understandable because the speaker is apparently still in prison, yet he delivered a speech that resonates so much in the African American community.

Nonetheless, TEDx said there are a few questions worth asking like “who am I speaking to? How’s the audience? Is it on the resort island of Bali or is it in London? That makes a HUGE difference.

Will you be filmed? If so, avoid wearing white or jet black.

Will you be using an over-the-ear microphone?  Avoid earrings that bang into the attachment – ultimately making loud, clanking noises.  Have a clean shave (for men)!

If you’re using accessories, avoid using flashy bracelets that would give off a reflection to those around you and in front of you.

What will the stage look like? Consider wearing something off-colour that sets you apart from the background.  If there’s a red background, choose a color that doesn’t blend in.  The audience loves bold, vibrant colors.

For men’s fashion, be sure your clothes are neatly pressed.  I BEG YOU! If you don’t care about the way your clothes are, I can tell just how disorganized your mind is.  I’ve worked with men before who look downright disgraceful; in addition, those specific individuals have the most personal problems.  True story.

Am I saying wear a suit? Probably not…..if you’re giving a Tedx on an island, but I would definitely consider a vest + slacks combo.  I feel that’s the most comfortable outfit and you can even dress it up or down.  Is a tie essential? In my opinion, no – unless it’s a formal outing.  Again, these little things are very important on top of knowing what type of audience you’re speaking to.

Ray Lewis knew that he would be doing a Tedx at Stanford University; therefore, he wore a gorgeous suit and tie because the majority of the crowd was Gen B.  If you’re going to wear a shirt and baggy jeans in front of Gen B, not only will you lose all respect, but they’re going to label you very fast before even saying your first line.

Just beware!

On Friday the 16th, a business associate and I will be doing an interview in terms of fashion and how it equals success….so stay tuned for that!  Hopefully this helps those out there.

Podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/episode/12079066

Dale Carnegie + Tedx = How To Keep Your Audience

So, I’m going to post a variety of videos today in regards to how public speakers can deliver a remarkably powerful message to keep the audience.

We know how a lot of speakers are: monotone speakers, talkers, bores, we have a wide variety.  Dale Carnegie talks in his book about how someone, with the power of conviction and passion, can lure the audience in and keep them.  It’s a combination of using the right emotion while speaking from the heart.  Let me give you a few examples and rundowns of what I think are and aren’t speakers who deliver the power of eloquence.

Regardless of him being Sir Ken Robinson, this monotone type speaking just kills me.  We have all had the professors in our past who can ramble for 2-3 hours and put everyone to sleep within the first 15….Ken is one.  No disrespect to his message, but the hastily speaking and lack of passion made me turn this one off within a few minutes.  Yes, he had some humor and there were some applauses, but you also have to evaluate the crowd he was speaking to.  13 years ago and in a foreign country, people wouldn’t get the majority of his jokes and probably wouldn’t understand half of his presentation because of how fast it is.

Yes, I will say this….having the accent she did with little to no grammatical mistakes was great, and even delivering the message about compassion and how NIST (international school in Bangkok) does separate themselves from just about 99.9% institutions around the world (including the most prestigious universities), if she would’ve spoken with a little more passion, it could’ve been great.  Also, the papers is one thing Dale Carnegie would talk about in terms of a distractor.  People would be glued into what she’s holding….so I say forgo the papers.  If you need to glance at something and get a hold of yourself, then so be it.  It also sounded a bit like verbatim to me, too.

2:09 – 2:38….this is one of the most remarkable storytellers I’ve ever seen.  Don Jose Ruiz….just simply amazing and definitely the most riveting of them all (debatable against Lisa Nichols).  This is how you tell a story, like I’ve mentioned a many of times on Tedx podcasts, with passion and conviction.

One of my favorite speakers of all-time.  The way she describes her stories in vivid detail is awe-inspiring.  How’s she able to make that audience feel everything she’s saying….there aren’t a lot of people like her in the public speaking realm.  This is how you relate completely to the audience.

A combination of remarkable finesse, humor, tears, and rejoice.  Les Brown is someone I’ve learned so much from and that I feel overtime I put him on in the morning.

Listen closely to the audiences.  See how they react.  When you do, you’ll see that some of these speakers merely talk on stage and others take the audience on a roller coaster.

Honorable Mention – Ray Lewis

TEDx – Getting Personal

Audiences could be warm, fuzzy, empathetic and loving; other audiences could be cold and monotonous to the point you lose inspiration in even giving a talk.

If you look at comedic stand-ups (although TED is much difference from hurling jokes at people), they look at people in the audience who’s enjoying their show, not the one’s who are disinterested.  There are tough crowds all around the world.  In America, L.A. and New York could have the toughest.  Across the pacific, Sydney and especially Melbourne would be just as difficult.  Why? Not sure….but a lot of people are apprehensive with letting someone put “thought” into their minds.

Communication

I like to look at my stage at a 180 degree angle and I find someone at the 180, 45, 90, 45, and 180.  When you’re talking and speaking amongst everyone, everyone seems to be interested.  There will be a handful of people who are fully engaged in your ideas, so it’s imperative to communicate with all sides of the audience.

Scientists have said that the act of two people staring at each other triggers an adoption of the emotional state.  It’s kind of like a sync.  What’s the best way to do that? SMILE! In a world where we don’t see a lot of people smiling, this is now a technology that can transform how a talk is received.

Showing vulnerability and opening yourself up is extremely crucial, too.  Looking back at Ray Lewis’ Ted Talk, he wasn’t afraid of showing the audience the pain he went through as a child when his step-father would beat his mother.  He had no shame.  However, it’s also important that you don’t overshare.  Don’t talk about you ex wife or ex gf….that could leave the audience squirming for retreat.

Making them laugh….naturally, triggers one of the best emotional reactions.  It’s kind of like if you meet someone by greeting them…and someone botches the handshake and you guys end of laughing.  Because of that emotional trigger, you’re more prone to memorize that particular person’s name because the laughter you both had.  That’s how you could be remembered on stage, but don’t force it.  If you’re not funny, don’t be funny.  If you’re serious, be serious.  If you’re egomaniacal, adopt a new personality before your talk.

And of course, learning how to become an influential story teller.  I’ll post a YouTube video from A-Fest in regards to Don Jose Ruiz and the wondrous Lisa Nichols.

YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFLWPLS1VzI&t=4363s

01:02:23 Lisa Nichols “Run, Leap, Soar”

02:09:07 Don Jose Ruiz “Expanding Art from the Heart”

Podcast – https://www.spreaker.com/episode/11486300

 

 

 

TEDx + Dale Carnegie = The Art of Public Speaking

I was heading down the escalator with one of my students to a general bookstore today to get her some material that would help with her vocabulary, grammar, and basic sentence structuring.  Personal Development, being my absolute favorite section of any bookstore, was the first place we went to.  After about 10-15 minutes of scanning, we grabbed a book enticing enough to kick off her first ever English book reads; and upon leaving the store, I saw Ted Talks by Christopher Anderson.

A few weeks ago, I posted a somewhat controversial comment on a Tedx video featuring one of Thailand’s “superstars.” Shortly after that, I got a response on two media platforms from the director of the school inviting me to the school where this particular woman graduated from and it changed my life forever.

So, given the history of what Tedx has brought me, I decided to buy the book just over 10 bucks and it reminded me of Dale Carnegie’s book “Public Speaking” which I’m still currently reading, or have been reading for the last year. DOPE!

With a combination of these two books, I realized I can deliver some really useful material both in blog form and podcast for regarding speeches, orators, publicly speaking and using fear to your advantage – among so many other things.

Just a few weeks ago I was having a very intellectual conversation with an extremely smart YouTuber about a variety of topics, and he said that public speaking was his worst fear.  Well, you’re not alone.  In fact, public speaking is just as big a fear as flying and even heights.  I’m going to conjure and deliver some great material for those of you who are in high school, college, heads of companies, heads of departments…etc, who desperately need to get over that fear.

I love what Les Brown said (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f8mGRToWyf8&t=2093s) about conquering fear in this video from 17:45-18:45.  When death is not an option, what else could you be afraid of? If you have family to feed and a mother and father to take care of, you’re going to do everything possible to face fear head-on, right? Well, join me on this journey!

Podcast – https://www.spreaker.com/episode/11245890