My First Tedx – Rundown & Notes

So, today marked the first day of doing my first ever Tedx on my podcast.  Here are some notes.

Separation

I’m trying to create a timeline from the beginning, preface, worst month, the overcoming, and then the resilience.

For example, I started it off with a visualization exercise which pinpointed that sever racial issues that plague this country.  This literally puts people into my state of awarness and make them view the world through my eyes.  This captures the audience (remember I told you about props before) instantaneously and now I have them in the palm of my hand.  After this process, they’re locked in and feel the raw emotion of what I felt.

After that, I pointed out some of the biggest problems I had.  The night I went home and slammed my arms on my bed, weeping.  Seeing the comments: “ewww, black man! Low-class! Pimp!” — and ultimately leading into the darkest month of my life.  I want this to be a journey, bringing people into the catacombs of what I went through.

The goal for a Tedx is what can the audience take from the Tedx? What can you give them? What can disrupt their biochemistry along the way? What could, and will be their breakthrough? That’s what came in the second half of my talk.

Comment From A Teacher

This was the changing point when a teacher, who I used to work with, told me, “Arsenio, you need to utilize all your skills.  You have a radio voice.  Create a podcast.”  I asked him what should the podcast be about and he said, “you’ll figure it out.”

Little did I know my story was being created after all those years, ultimately converting it into a podcast with personal development after a botched trip to Singapore.

Yes, there were still some problems along the way and some racial tensions, but they subsided after I started feeding my mind with texts that have been written in the last 100 years.  That was the beginning.

Would love to hear your feedback in my podcast down below!

https://www.spreaker.com/user/thearseniobuckshow/arsenio-bucks-tedx-round-1-untitled

Tedx – What To Wear

In my personal opinion, what you wear means everything on-stage.  I was referred a Tedx video by one of my colleagues, and although he did crack a few jokes, I couldn’t take his appearance.  He was wearing about 5 different colors, spoke extremely fast, and had one of the most awkward stances I’ve seen on stage.  You just can’t look ridiculous.

On the other hand, there was this video.

Now, this attire is completely understandable because the speaker is apparently still in prison, yet he delivered a speech that resonates so much in the African American community.

Nonetheless, TEDx said there are a few questions worth asking like “who am I speaking to? How’s the audience? Is it on the resort island of Bali or is it in London? That makes a HUGE difference.

Will you be filmed? If so, avoid wearing white or jet black.

Will you be using an over-the-ear microphone?  Avoid earrings that bang into the attachment – ultimately making loud, clanking noises.  Have a clean shave (for men)!

If you’re using accessories, avoid using flashy bracelets that would give off a reflection to those around you and in front of you.

What will the stage look like? Consider wearing something off-colour that sets you apart from the background.  If there’s a red background, choose a color that doesn’t blend in.  The audience loves bold, vibrant colors.

For men’s fashion, be sure your clothes are neatly pressed.  I BEG YOU! If you don’t care about the way your clothes are, I can tell just how disorganized your mind is.  I’ve worked with men before who look downright disgraceful; in addition, those specific individuals have the most personal problems.  True story.

Am I saying wear a suit? Probably not…..if you’re giving a Tedx on an island, but I would definitely consider a vest + slacks combo.  I feel that’s the most comfortable outfit and you can even dress it up or down.  Is a tie essential? In my opinion, no – unless it’s a formal outing.  Again, these little things are very important on top of knowing what type of audience you’re speaking to.

Ray Lewis knew that he would be doing a Tedx at Stanford University; therefore, he wore a gorgeous suit and tie because the majority of the crowd was Gen B.  If you’re going to wear a shirt and baggy jeans in front of Gen B, not only will you lose all respect, but they’re going to label you very fast before even saying your first line.

Just beware!

On Friday the 16th, a business associate and I will be doing an interview in terms of fashion and how it equals success….so stay tuned for that!  Hopefully this helps those out there.

Podcast: https://www.spreaker.com/episode/12079066