Speed of Trust: Season 4 – Episode 38 – Create Transparency

Behavior #3 — Create Transparency — is about being open. It’s about being real and genuine and telling the truth in a way people can verify. It’s based on principles of honesty, openness, integrity, and authenticity. I also like to include the principle of light, because when something is transparent, light will flow through it.

The opposite of creating transparency is to hide, cover, obscure, or make dark. It includes hoarding, withholding, having secrets, and failing to disclose. It includes hidden agendas, hidden meaning, hidden objectives.

The counterfeit of transparency is illusion. It’s pretending, “seeming” rather than “being,” making things appear different than they really are. The internet is a good example of both transparency and illusion. At the same time as it engenders extraordinary transparency, allowing people to get information and access truth wherever they live, it also creates a place where people can make up false names.

Stephen Covey’s Speed of Trust

Transparency will usually establish trust fast. For example, when a charity recently fell into trouble, it took the quickest path to restore trust, which was simply to show people where their money was going. In situations where there is a conflict of interest, the best way to prevent it from turning into a concern is to simple by up-front about it and to address it in the spirit of complete disclosure. Transparent companies are constantly disclosing relationships, interests, and conflicts ahead of time so that everything is always out in the open and no one can question their agenda.

Stories in the podcast

  • Pencils of promise
  • Ex-colleague and being a bad teacher
 

Speed of Trust: Season 4 – Episode 37 – Demonstrating Trust Part III – Tips

Think back to some of the researched. Why is it that only 29 percent of employees believe that management cares about them developing their skills? Why is it that only 42 percent believe that management cares about them at all? In too many cases, though management might talk about it, fundamentally, management does not behave in ways that demonstrate respect, and as a result, employees don’t trust management.

And what is the impact on speed and cost? When employees believe their managers really don’t care, how willing are they to give their best? To be innovative? To collaborate? On the other hand, how quick are employees to complain? Criticize? Strike?

Stories in Podcast

  • Present work story about director not caring
  • Employee getting a free pass for no-call, no-show

Trust Tips

Apply the “waiter” rule to yourself in terms of how you treat people at work and at home. Do you like what you see? If not, focus on improving your intent?

Think about specific things you can do to show others you care about them. Call people. Write thank-you notes. Give acknowledgement. Send emails of concern. Try to do something each day to put a smile on someone’s face–even if that someone is the janitor in the building where you work. Don’t let there be a gap between how you feel and what you do.

Never take relationships for granted — particularly relationships with loved ones, family, and friends. Avoid the common tendency to put more energy into new relationships and assume that people in existing relationships know you care. There is probably a greater need for demonstrations of concern in existing relationships than in new relationships.

The basis of this is to genuinely care for others. Show you care. Respect the dignity of every person and every role. Treat everyone with respect. Show kindness. Don’t fake caring. Don’t attempt to be “efficient” with people.

Stephen Covey’s Speed of Trust: Season 4 – Episode 33 – Behavior #1 – Talk Straight

At one time I worked with a person who would never let you know where he stood on an issue until the decision was made and the wisdom of the decision was either validated or shown to be in error. You could never pin him down. However, once the decision was finally made and the results were in, he rode the winning horse and energetically asserted that had been his opinion all along.

At one point a very important proposal came up in our executive meeting. I knew that if we acted on this proposal, it would either be fantastic or it would bomb. As usual, this person said a lot in the meeting, but he really didn’t commit one way or the other.

Tired of his sidestepping, I wanted to have him on record as committing one way or the other. So that night I went to his home to talk with him. He knew that I was against the proposal. So when I asked him where he stood, he said, “oh, I am totally against it.”

The next day, in front of the entire group, I said to him, “Yesterday in our meeting it wasn’t clear to me where you stood on this issue. Would you please share your views?” The chairman of the company was at this meeting, and because this man knew that the chairman wanted to accept this proposal, he postured entirely differently than he had with me the night before.

Somewhat exasperated, I said to him, “That’s not at all what you said last night to me. You said that you were totally against it.”

“Yes, well that’s what I was thinking at that point, but….”

Stephen Covey’s Speed of Trust

It doesn’t get any truer, does it?

Let me give you a story. I had a student who had come into my life back in June of last year. She was very open-minded and very friendly; however, during that specific course, she would say some things that would never be said in western culture. She would use ignorant gambits to try to bait me into getting angry about what she was saying. At this time, and following that, I should’ve dropped her and never taught her as a student. However, she requested me to teach her privately at the language center and she brought her girlfriend along.

All seemed well until days before Christmas when the bomb was dropped. Complaints were hurled and I was dropped as a teacher. Get this, just a day before, we spoke in the hallway as if nothing happened. It was head-scratching and laughable….and at the same time, I told myself: “if I ever have an overly friendly student, drop them.” Unless it’s on my personal website, I want to save the ignorance.

See, some people are two total opposites. I can careless about the situation, but I’m very scared about the individuals who have done that because if they’re planning on living overseas and do that, this can be a catastrophic problem. Yes, we do the same thing in America culture, but how they did it was completely unacceptable.

Guys, be straight. I shouldn’t have been teaching lazy, ignorant students past their due date. Yes, I stuck my neck out for them and tried my hardest to push them to getting a high score — only to get thrown under the bus. They surely should’ve had some problems dating back months, so why not drop me then? Why didn’t I communicate my ideas across before?

I learned.

Podcast

Stephen Covey: Season 4 – Episode 32 – Second Wave – Relationship Trust

Welcome back to another blog, people! We’re getting into another phase of Stephen Covey’s Speed of Trust, and this one is going to be a very enticing one. It’s time to start getting into the relationship aspect of things and breakdown what behaviors are.

The truth is that in every relationship — personal and professional — what you do has far greater impact than anything you say. You can say you love someone — but unless you demonstrate that love through your actions, your words become meaningless. You can say you want to engage in win-win negotiation — but unless your behavior shows that you really mean it, you will come across as insincere. You can say your company puts the customer first. You can say that you recognize people as your most important asset. However, unless you actually do them, your words will not build trust; in fact, they will destroy it.

 

You have to build it. A lot of people ask “how can I do it.”

Well, remember the caring person thing? If you’re not a caring person now — but you desire to be a caring person — then go out and behave in caring ways.

It may take time, but you have to take the initiative.

Building Trust Accounts

Remember my famous blog “the Emotional Bank Account?” Yeah, these are similar to what Sean Covey’s dad had written about in his book 30 years ago. Let’s go over them.

Each Trust Account is unique

Recognizing uniqueness can help you build each account more effectively. A 12-year-old’s account will be astonishingly different from a mid-20’s guy.

All deposits and withdrawals are not created equal.

Often the little things can be disproportionately large. Getting an email from someone about a natural disaster or some type of imminent danger would be much different from forgetting your partner’s birthday.

What constitutes a “deposit” to one person may not to another.

I had a situation rise that was similar to this. One of my friend’s thought staying out late would be a deposit if I’m bonding with other people, but I considered that to be a significant withdrawal.

Listen to “Stephen Covey: Season 4 – Episode 32 – Second Wave – Relationship Trust” on Spreaker.

Stephen Covey’s Speed of Trust: Season 4 – Episode 23 – The Final ‘S’ in Tasks

The biggest questions of a lifetime for business owners. You know, I was thinking about the time Jack Ma had to fire employees because of the problems he was having with Ali Baba. Through what Napoleon Hill has said, “Applied Faith,” he was able to see things through and work his way out of the rut, making a billion (and soon-to-be trillion) dollar empire. Here are your questions.

The biggest questions of a lifetime for business owners. You know, I was thinking about the time Jack Ma had to fire employees because of the problems he was having with Ali Baba. Through what Napoleon Hill has said, “Applied Faith,” he was able to see things through and work his way out of the rut, making a billion (and soon-to-be trillion) dollar empire. Here are your questions.

  • How effective is your current style in approaching problems and opportunities and interacting with others?
  • Does your approaching facilitate or get in the way of accomplishing what needs to be done?
  • What can you do to improve the way in which you go about doing things?

Lots of ideas came to mind about how well I handle situations. Room for improvement is wide-open, and I need to start feeling things gaps ASAP.

I can get considerably better when it comes to approaching problems. Example, there was an issue at an old job whereas a guy called me out in a number of ways. I shouldn’t have taken that lightly, and even more, I could’ve forwarded the emails and voice messages he had sent me to the owner. Regardless, because he’s white in a very pro-white country, he would’ve gotten a free-pass. But allowing people to get away with unruly behavior is even worse.

When it comes to interacting with others, I’m almost certain that I do an incredible job in that area because that’s one of my strongest points. I pick up energy signals very easily, and this is very important because if people come to me with jobs, I should be able to point them in the right direction of a good teacher, rather than one that would just tarnish my reputation.

An example would be a new employee (or new ones every week) at my job on the weekend. It’s none of my business, but because I’m good at picking up energy, there’s one specific new teacher that has “HORRIBLE” written all over him. If you guys listened/read my blogs from early last year, you’ll know exactly what I’m talking about. I don’t give a second look or anything to these teachers. I don’t introduce myself because they’ve been the bane of my existence here. If they’re not someone who has ideas or anything, why even bother? Most of them complain or say some very sick things that pertains to under-age girls (yeah, welcome to Thailand). So, OQP (Only Quality People).

That’s in the world of business.

When it comes to my entrepreneurial world, I can seriously learn to get better at appropriating time slots for when I should be on social media. I feel if I leave notifications on all day, I can lose maybe 1-1.5 hours. So, as of today, I’ve turned them off and they’ve helped me considerably. The only messages I receive are of importance from my graphic designer. Facebook messages in the morning while commuting (anytime while commuting) is enough. Other apps at the same time. No FB at home or during my core hours.

This is how you can identify what’s working and what isn’t….so I suggest all of you do the same with the questions above!

Podcast

Stephen Covey’s Speed of Trust: Season 4 – Episode 22 – The K in Tasks

Welcome back to another Stephen Covey blog with lots of explanations! Here are some questions for you to answer.

What is your current level of knowledge in your specific field?

What are you doing to NOT stay current?

What other areas of knowledge are you pursuing?

So, lately I’ve been having some hot sweats — hot sweats of the feelings I used to feel doing things that I absolutely hated to do. 2004, a year where I was DEAD BORED with school. 2005, watching TV all day long and not learning a damn things while saturating myself with sports and other things to keep me busy and away from making rash decisions.

Hell, even when I lived in Australia, or on those boring Saturdays and Sundays off from work…..it was a life of misery, while I was going to college.

Throughout my life, I was never asked about my purpose. I was never asked “do you really like what you’re doing?”

Karen Mulcahy, an ex-university professor, asked me “why do you want to become a dental assistant?”

I replied, “well, I’ve never had a nice smile and I would love to change others smiles because that’s the first thing we see.

First part was wrong, I’ve always had a nice smile, excluding my bottom incisors. However, I didn’t have the ability to change smiles as a dental assistant.

As a dental assistant, what could I have done to improve my knowledge and skills? Oh, ok…let me learn the different types of softwares related to the dental field and possible get paid more.

Get paid more….and then?

It was a dead-end job from the beginning and I was able to escape the rat race of just saying, “let me just making money for the weekend and travel twice a year…enjoy my life only twice a year before going back to a horrendous career.”

Some of you are in that career right NOW! Doing the same tasks and hating your life. I’m inviting you to take the leap.

For those of you who have already made the leap, ask yourself your questions about your specific field.

I was just having a conversation with another English Language tutor, and she said she wanted to go back to university to learn about business, reading, and writing — three things that I’ve learned ON MY OWN. The information is everywhere. I improved my knowledge of subjects taught out here in Thailand and was paid more for doing so.

That was 4 years ago. Since then, the amount of knowledge I have now is unbelievable and continuing to increase.

Don’t Stay Current

You stay current and you will lose. Apple has taken catastrophic hits. Sure, 245 billion in hard cash, but they’re now #3 in the world because they’re no longer innovating and hiking prices even more…with the same functions. This is a dead company.

If you’re not looking 5-10 years ahead and not innovating, you will fall way behind.

The areas I continue pursuing is insight and revelation. I want to continue learning and learning from people as much as possible because i know with experiences and collaboration brings some of the greatest heights of anyone’s life. That will be talked about in another blog, but please take these questions into account and start jotting down ideas.

Listen to “Stephen Covey’s Speed of Trust: Season 4 – Episode 22 – The K in Tasks” on Spreaker.

Stephen Covey’s Speed of Trust: Season 4 – Episode 21 – The S in Tasks

We’re back to another brilliant episode! I’m actually backtracking a bit in terms of my blogs, but the podcasts are here!

So, here are your questions!

  • What skills do you currently have?
  • What skills will you need in the future that you don’t currently have?
  • To what degree are you involved in constantly upgrading your skills?

These are some excellent questions to assess where you are in your life.

First, if I look at the current skills I have, they’re finally helping me land some excellent gigs. Let me give you an example.

Since the end of 2014, I’ve learned Business English, TOEIC, TOEFL, IELTS, 4skills, Academic Writing, and so many other subjects. Not only that….that’s probably the easiest part because normally you can teach these just by being given a book. Welcome to Thailand. However, what could you possibly implement into the lessons to make them life-changing. Life-changing like someone who reads a book….they want their lives to change (or at least me). Whatever I invest my time in, I want to be able to take whatever I invest my time in and apply it to my life. If it doesn’t do that, I don’t waste my time. I would NEVER invest my time watching any sports event because the ROI (return on investment) is negative, meaning if my team loses, I’m going to throw an incredible fit and cry about something i have NO control over. Get the drift?

Stephen Covey also said in his book, “what skills do you need to stay current?”

Wrong attitude.

You never want to stay current. Look at Radioshack, Blockbuster, JCPenney, Dillards, and stores in your own neighborhood. If you don’t consistently innovate and cater to your audience/niche that you’re associated with (B to B), you will LOSE.

I consistently look for ways to improve myself, my lessons, and throw curve balls in all my lessons. If I’m giving workshops, I make sure I cater to the customer. The customer needs only what the customer wants. It’s not about what I want. If a top Asian bank asks me, “I’m interested in Leadership and Personal Development,” I won’t try persuading them otherwise.

Thinking beyond is the most important. At the beginning of last year, I preached that I would take out all these language centers because I’m not selling a book, but myself.

A year later, all of those language centers who go after top corporations around BKK, they’re going to be without and taken out by a one-man army. Why? People love authenticity and HATE middlemen.

Journal everything down and let’s keep moving!

 

Stephen Covey’s Speed of Trust: Season 4 – Episode 19 – The T in Tasks

Yes! The Stephen Covey blogs are back, and I’m super excited to present you today with the T in Tasks. Now, some of you are probably asking “what is the acronym “tasks?”

Well let’s get into it.

Talents are natural gifts and strengths. Attitudes represent our paradigms — our ways of seeing, as well as our ways of being. Skills are our proficiencies, the things we can do well. Knowledge represents our learning, insight, understanding, and awareness. Style represents our unique approach and personality.

There are all parts of what we call our capabilities. They are our means to produce results. By breaking them down into these components, we are able to more fully explore them, both independently and interdependently.

Stephen Covey

Talents: What are your unique strengths or talents? What is the highest and best use of your talents? How can you better maximize the talents you have? What talents might you have not developed yet?

Mine? Making people laugh, speaking to people, and influencing.

Did I know before that I had these talents? No. I was a shy, timid kid in 9th grade of high school that had ZERO speaking abilities. I ended up spending time with one of the funniest people I’ve ever met, and of course, I became what he was. I began making people laugh. I started to speak to people without fear. However, Australia put a huge dent in everything because being in a society where everyone is stone-faced (sorry, Aussies), it was difficult for me to be myself. I thought no one liked me. I thought I had too much personality.

It wasn’t until the magnificent Thailand, a country that believed that I was a disgusting, black criminal, when I got back into the driver’s seat of my life and developed my personality into the infectious and radiating sunlight it is today (well, maybe not that amazing…but you get the point).

So, over to you.

 

Stephen Covey’s Speed of Trust: Season 4 – Episode 18 – Core III – Capabilities Part II

So, this is a follow-up of what I’ve already written and talked about on my previous blog post. Let’s look at some of the people I’ve come across.

You could be the individual who has enormous capabilities, but be lacking in integrity, intent, or results.

For instance, you might have tremendous potential….and it remains just that — potential.

Let me give you a few examples.

There was a colleague I worked for who had a Masters in Business and Finance, yet he was in Thailand. It didn’t make much sense. Honestly, he was one of the most brilliant minds I’ve ever come across and gave me the original idea to start doing a podcast…..but he was never walking his own walk.

Another individual, who my content writer is in talks with (and has been for a while) has an insane amount of potential, is extremely smart, and the sky’s the limit….but she lacks self-trust and dooms everything right out of the gates.

Kenny, an ex-colleague at the College of Southern Nevada, was SOOO unbelievably smart. He knew about investments and anything you could ever imagine…yet, just worked as a slave in the front office of a dental faculty practice. An UNBELIEVABLY ENORMOUS AMOUNT OF POTENTIAL….but never walked his walk.

Guys and gals, capabilities mean everything in this globalizing and technologically advanced world. We’re outdating skill-sets faster than ever before. So you need to ask yourself some questions.

  • What capabilities do you have that make you credible and that inspire the trust and confidence in others.
  • What experience have you had (or not had) in developing capabilities that affects the confidence you have in yourself?
  • What impact are factors such as technology and globalization having on the relevance of your current capabilities.
  • What is your attitude and approach toward improving your current capabilities and gaining new ones?

Listen to “Stephen Covey’s Speed of Trust: Season 4 – Episode 18 – Core III – Capabilities Part II” on Spreaker.

 

Stephen Covey’s Speed of Trust: Season 4 – Episode 16 – Choose Abundance

Abundance means that there is enough for everybody. The opposite –scarcity — says that there is only so much to go earound, and if you get it, I won’t. While scarcity may be a reality in some areas (such as competitive sports or forced grading curves), in most of the important things in life – such as love, success, energy, results, and trust — abundance is not only a reality, it is an attractor and generator of even more.

Stephen Covey’s Speed of Trust

Extremely hard to believe, huh? I just went through a breakup, and although it feels like I have moved on, I’m not accepting that the other half has moved on, too. It’s almost as if I don’t want her to move on. It’s almost if I want her to regret making the decision to move on.

Ridiculous, huh?

Back in 2009, and with the last probably REAL relationship I had, I did everything it took to be ahead of her — to act more happy and everything would eventually follow. She got into a rebound relationship, and because I still hadn’t moved on at the time, I was crushed. Beyond belief.

Abundance, in terms of love, is something that is very hard for me to see. However, the other areas are definitely everywhere around us.

Questions

  • Do I believe that if i love other people, my own supply of love will be replenished — or diminished?
  • Do I believe that there’s room for other people to see things differently than I do…..and still be right?
  • Do I believe that, whatever my economic circumstances, I can share with and benefit others?

I love this following story about Oprah Winfrey.

Some role models show us clearly that whatever our past experience — even if it includes a painful and unfair childhood — we can rescript ourselves to create abundance in our lives and in the lives of others.

Consider Oprah Winfrey, who was raised in rural Mississippi by her grandparents and abused by a relative as a youth. She chose to reframe her circumstances and rise above them.

 

“I don’t think of myself as a poor deprive ghetto girl who made good. I think of myself as somebody who from an early age knew I was responsible for myself, and i had to make good.”

 

“You should not be satisfied with being a victim, nor with being a survivor. You should aim to be a conqueror. there is an extraordinary quality of spirit that leads one to aspire to conquering rather than surviving. I hope you discover that spirit in yourself.”

Stephen Covey

These powerful role models serve us as powerful practitioners.

Listen to “Stephen Covey’s Speed of Trust: Season 4 – Episode 16 – Choose Abundance” on Spreaker.