TOEFL iBT | Speaking | 1 on 1 Coaching | Questions 1-3: Her Road to a 28 In Speaking!

So, I decided to chop up a coaching session with my student who had recently gotten a 28 on the speaking section of TOEFL. My editing isn’t the best, but in this video, you’re going to hear a tremendous amount of feedback, as well as her answers to everything and those “moments of clarity.” She invested in 8 hours of coaching and got the mark of 28, and this is coaching session #3 so hear how I break everything down!

TOEFL iBT | Independent Essay | Evaluating an Essay | Progress Achieved!

So grateful to have seen the growth of one of my students.  The amazing dentist from Venezuela now understands exactly how to execute a cohesive essay.  I’m grateful that she went through with the coaching and now we’re just waiting on her result!

TOEFL iBT | Reading | Webinar Preview (This Weekend)

It’s Monday, and it’s another week for a wonderful webinar! In this week’s webinar, I will be covering TOEFL iBT (Reading). On my membership, I have blogs/exercises in which I use techniques to find the answer.  In the upcoming webinar this weekend, we will apply all of the techniques to a specific reading passage and see how everyone does! The seating is unlimited and the buy-in is just $5. After the webinar, you will have the video uploaded onto the link (for a lifetime), and the membership will be at a 5% discount, as well as the additional coaching hours (33% discount) because you bought the webinar, to begin with. 

Let me know if you’re interested in some reading techniques!

I will debut a full reading lesson later today, so stay tuned!

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TOEFL iBT | Integrated Essay | The 40/60 Rule

We’re back with an amazing TOEFL iBT Membership Sneak Peek. In today’s episode, I have a wonderful Venezuelan dentist who submitted her Integrated task, and I’m here to help her in putting the structure together. So, because she had received a 17 in her writing, being the lowest of all bands, I was a bit nervous to see her writing. However, after seeing it, I know exactly why she received a low score, and it’s because she didn’t use the 40/60 rule. Tune in!

TOEFL iBT | Listening | Lecture | 1 on 1 Coaching | The Bobo Doll Experiment

We’re here with  PQ Content (Prolific Quality) and in today’s podcast, we’ve got ourselves a cut-out coaching session for you guys! Ange, from the Philippines, wanted to do some listening in her coaching session, and it ended up turning into one of the best I had ever done to this date. You guys can also take notes, prepare your answers, choose which ones and walk with us on this journey of solving. Enjoy! Remember, TOEFL iBT Membership features many more of these, so if you’re interested, make sure you tune in! If you want to practice, listen to the audio in the podcast and then answer the questions down below!

Questions

1 According to social learning theory, how does a child learn aggressive behaviour?

  • Through playing with toys
  • Through their genetics
  • Through learning and interaction
  • All the above

2 What was done to the children who were assigned to the control group?

  • They were subjected to aggressive models
  • They received no treatment
  • They were subjected to non-aggressive models
  • They received both aggressive and nonaggressive models

3 What was an opposite-sex model in the Bobo Doll experiment?

  • The control group had equal number of girls and boys.
  • Boys were exposed to violence committed by an adult female
  • Girls were exposed to violence committed by an adult male
  • Both B and C

4 According to the lecture, which statement was used to describe the experiment?

  • The results of the experiment could be used to generalize a wide variety of situations
  • The experiment was criticized as being unethical
  • The study of behaviour led the psychologist to believe that violence is acceptable.
  • The experiment is considered to be a failure in proving social learning theory

5 From the results observed, what might be the reason for including opposite-sex and same-sex models?

  • To study the implication of gender specific violence
  • To study girls and boys separately
  • To study the differences between men and women
  • The difference in models is just random

6 What was one of the major ideas demonstrated through Bandura’s experiment?

  • Girls behaved less aggressively than boys
  • Children learned aggressive behavior through learning and imitation
  • Control groups were more aggressive than others
  • Aggression was not learned

Answers on next page

TOEFL iBT | Reading | 3 Strategies for Answering ‘Sentence Insertion Questions’

Oh, we’re back! I’m excited about this one because it’s been a long time coming! In this episode, I’ll be teaching you how to answer Sentence Insertion Questions, and if you want the full breakdown, my TOEFL iBT Membership is FREE FOR TWO DAYS! Take advantage of it and check out the other awesome things you have available! Remember to watch my video, too!

Webinar June 19th!

WELCOME, ALL!

Oh, so many of you asked, I’ve delivered. 

In the first-ever TOEFL Speaking Webinar, you guys will learn all the tips and techniques for establishing yourself as a great speaker in question 1. 

Because TOEFL Speaking question 1 is one of the most difficult (especially in developing ideas), it’s crucial to understand the HOW TO, and that’s exactly what you’ll be getting in this phenomenal webinar!

We’ll be covering agre//disagree, preferential questions, and much more — you’ll also have the ability to practice with me, speak, and I’ll be giving you live feedback.  The goal is to have around 5 students for the webinar so that we can have maximum speaking time for each student. This webinar will be a minimum of 1 hour and a maximum 1.5 hours — and don’t worry! After the webinar, you’ll have it for your lifetime!  

Not able to make it? That’s ok! You’ll be able to purchase the webinar after, too! 

In saying that, if you’re interested in other speaking questions, reading (such as the videos I’ve uploaded), listening or writing webinars, let me know!

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TOEFL iTP | Reading | Protecting the Coastline

Welcome back to another TOEFL iTP! We’re on fire with the readings, and you guys love my TOEFL iTP Reading blogs. Remember, on July the 1st, you will be able to preorder my TOEFL iTP Reading Course! Nonetheless, let’s get into this!

TOEFL iTP Structure Course (priced at $57). Or, you can buy the Written Expression (now $27) and get the Structure Course for just $30! Inquire today!

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In the first half of the nineteenth century, the U.S. government decided that it needed to set up a system for protecting its coastline. It then began building a series of forts along the coast of the eastern part of the country to facilitate its defenses.

The largest of these forts was Fort Jefferson, which was begun in 1846. This fort was built on Garden Key, a cluster of small coral islands 70 miles west of Key West. At the time of its construction, Fort Jefferson was believed to be of primary strategic importance to the United States because of its location at the entryway to the Gulf of Mexico. Because of its location at the entrance to a great body of water, it became known as the Gibraltar of the Gulf, in reference to the island located at the mouth of the Mediterranean. The fort itself was a massive structure. It was hexagonal in shape, most of the Garden Key, it was approximately half a mile in circumference.

In the latter half of the nineteenth century, during the Civil War and its aftermath, the fort was used as a prison rather than a military installation. The most notorious of its prisoners was Dr. Samuel Mudd, a physician who was most probably innocently involved in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. The actual assassin, John Wilkes Booth, broke his leg as he lept from the stage of the Ford Theater during the assassination. Dr. Mudd set Booth’s broken leg, unaware of Booth’s involvement in the assassination. As a result of this action, Dr. Mudd was sentenced to life in prison and remanded to Fort Jefferson. He was pardoned after only four years because of his courageous efforts in combatting an epidemic of yellow fever that ravaged the fort.

Continuous use of Fort Jefferson ended in the 1870s, although the U.S. Navy continued with sporadic use of it into the twentieth century. Today, the massive ruins still remain of the tiny island that stands guard over the entrance to the gulf, undisturbed except for the occasional sightseer who ventures out from the coast to visit.

Longman
  1. The passage is mainly about
  • A series of forts
  • A series of events at one fort
  • A single event at one fort
  • A series of events at several forts
  • All of the following are true about Fort Jefferson EXCEPT that
  • It is on an island
  • It was built because of its strategic location
  • It is in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico
  • It has been compared with an island at the opening of the Mediterranean
  • The word “hexagonal” in line 9 is closest in meaning to
  • Six-sided
  • Seven-sided
  • Eight-sided
  • Irregular in shape
  • The pronoun “it” in line 11 refers to
  • Fort
  • Shape
  • Moat
  • Circumference
  • All of the following are stated about Dr. Samuel Mudd EXCEPT that
  • He was a medical doctor
  • He cared for Lincoln’s assassin
  • He was imprisoned at Fort Jefferson
  • He was most likely guilty of Lincoln’s assassination
  • How was Fort Jefferson most likely used in 1865?
  • As a strategic defensive unit of U.S. military
  • As a penal institution
  • As a regularly functioning naval base
  • As a destination for tourists
  • “Yellow fever” in line 19 is most likely
  • an enemy military force
  • a prison regimen
  • a contagious disease
  • a mental illness
  • What is implied about Fort Jefferson today?
  • It is a thriving community.
  • It is a relatively quiet place.
  • It is still in use by the U.S. military.
  • It remains in good condition.
  • Where in the passage does the author describe an injury to the man who shot Lincoln?
  1. Lines 5-7
  2. Lines 13-15
  3. Lines 15-16
  4. Lines 18-19
  1. The information in the passage is presented
  • In chronological order
  • By listing examples of a concept
  • In spatial order
  • By arguing for a hypothesis

Podcast

Answers on next page!

TOEFL iBT | Speaking Q3 | Membership Exclusive | Full Tutorial

Here’s a full tutorial on the speaking question 3! I have two different variations here (easy question and hard question), as well as how to write your reading introduction, the transition, and what language to use throughout your speaking question. Speaking questions 1, 2, and 4 are available on my TOEFL iBT Membership, and if you sign up, you get a free two-day trial (two free evaluations) and you can submit the second speaking question in this video! Follow my ESL Podcast Page on IG and I’ll be seeing you there!

Podcast

TOEFL iTP | Reading | Hope Diamond

We’re back with another! I told everyone that I would be taking care of them! Ha! I’m the go-to blog for all your TOEFL iTP needs (podcasts and YouTube, too). So, in saying that, here’s a great read for you!

TOEFL iTP Structure Course (priced at $57). Or, you can buy the Written Expression (now $27) and get the Structure Course for just $30! Inquire today!

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Perhaps better known than the Cullinan Diamond is the Hope Diamond, a valuable and rare blue gem with a background of more than 300 years as a world traveler. The 112-carat blue stone that later became the Hope Diamond was mined in India sometime before the middle of the seventeenth century and was first known to be owned by Shah Jahan, who built the Taj Mahal in memory of his beloved wife. From India, the celebrated blue stone has changed hands often, moving from location to location in distant corners of the world.

In the middle of the seventeenth century, a trader from France named Jean Baptiste Tavernier acquired the large blue diamond, which was rumored to have been illegally removed from a temple. Tavernier returned to France with the blue gem, where the stone was purchased by the Sun King, Louis XIV. Louis XIV had it cut down from 112 to 67 carats to make its shape symmetrical and to maximize its sparkle. The newly cut diamond, still huge by any standards, was passed down through the royal family of France until it arrived in the hands of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. During the French Revolution, Louis XVI and his wife met their fate on the guillotine in 1793, and the big blue diamond disappeared from public sight.

The diamond somehow managed to get from France to England, where banker Henry Hope purchased it from a gem dealer early in the nineteenth century. The huge bluestone was cut into a 45.5-carat oval, and at his point, it took on the name by which it is known today. The diamond stayed in the Hope family for around a century, when deep indebtedness brought on by a serious gambling habit on the part of one of Henry Hope’s heirs forced the sale of the diamond.

From England, the Hope Diamond may have made its way into the hands of the Sultan of Turkey; whatever route it took to get there, it eventually went on to the United States when American Evelyn Walsh McLean purchased it in 1911. Mrs. McLean certainly enjoyed showing the diamond off; guests in her home were sometimes astounded to notice the huge stone embellishing the neck of Mrs. McLean’s Great Dane as the huge pet trotted around the grounds of her Washington, D.C. home. The Hope Diamond later became the property of jeweler Harry Winston, who presented the stunning 45.5-carat piece to the Smithsonian in 1958. The Hope Diamond is now taking a well-earned rest following its rigorous travel itinerary and is on display at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., where it had been since 1958.

LONGMAN
  1. The paragraph preceding the passage most likely discussed
  • Why gems are considered valuable
  • How the Hope Diamond was mined
  • A diamond other than the Hope Diamond
  • Methods for mining diamonds
  • The main idea of this passage is that the Hope Diamond
  • Came from India
  • Has moved around a lot
  • Has been cut several times
  • Now resides in the Smithsonian
  • The pronoun “it” in line 8 refers to
  • Its shape
  • The newly cut diamond
  • The royal family
  • The French revolution
  • It can be inferred from the passage that the author is not certain
  • Who bought the Hope Diamond in England
  • Who sold the Hope Diamond in England
  • How the Hope Diamond went from France to England
  • How big the Hope Diamond was in the nineteenth century
  • A “dealer” in line 12 is most likely a
  • Card player
  • Miner
  • Cutter
  • Businessman
  • It can be determined from the passage that Henry Hope most likely had how many carats cut off the Hope Diamond?
  • 21.5
  • 45.5
  • 66.5
  • 67
  • According to the passage, Mrs. McLean
  • Donated the Hope Diamond to the Smithsonian
  • Let her dog wear the Hope Diamond
  • Purchased the Hope Diamond from the French
  • Had the Hope Diamond cut to its present size of 45.5 carats
  • Which country is NOT mentioned in the passage as a place where the Hope Diamond spent some time?
  • India
  • France
  • England
  • Denmark
  • Where in the Passage does the author describe what happened to the royal French owners of the diamond?
  • Lines 7-8
  • Lines 10-11
  • Lines 12-14
  • Lines 15-16

Podcast

Answers on next page!

TOEFL iBT Membership Sneak Peek | Speaking Evaluations | Questions 2: Sculpture

We’re back with another phenomenal speaking evaluation! So, for those of you that don’t know, if you subscribe to my TOEFL iBT Membership (two-day free trial), you will get four speaking evaluations FOR FREE (priced at $4 per evaluation) and this is how I would break it down and give you feedback. These could be very useful for a lot of you out there, so here’s a 10-minute video/podcast for you. Remember, you get two free days and you can submit two free essays for review! Take advantage of this!

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