Fitness Entrepreneurs Pod #1: Conditioning + Spartan Training Tips

Boy! This was an exciting podcast.  Moustafo and Hakeem, two podcasters (in their own right) and fitness entrepreneurs who live in Malaysia, joined me this morning to talk about conditioning and Spartan training.  I’m amazed how much knowledge these young individuals have in the health spectrum of everything.  Because this will be a 2-3 weekly type of podcast, I do want you guys to send your questions in.  The next podcast will be on Crossfit, so anything crossfit related would be great!

Get in touch with Fitness entrepreneurs

– The art of conditioning and Spartan training.

Links:

Hakeem Khan

 

Moustafa Sano

 

Things we discussed:

  • Introduction given by the host and his guests.
  • The differences between cardio and conditioning.
  • How the guests condition their bodies?
  • The length of their training.
  • Building of death leaps and squad.
  • Understand what your goals for training are.
  • Talking about trying marathon.
  • Moustafo shared his Rugby story.
  • Sharing about unfortunate accidents and injuries.
  • What are the basics of conditioning training?
  • Sharing about running and marathon.
  • Final thoughts by the guests.

 

Thank you for listening!

 

Thank you so much for joining me for this podcast. Please do write down some feedbacks and comments. Please do share this podcast to your social media.

 

Links:

Podcast

 

Pre-Workout: Amino Energy Review

You guys don’t know, but two days ago had to be the most terrifying moment of my life.  After sucking down two cups of coffee (1pm and 4pm), I decided to “test” out my new pre-workout, Amino Energy, at 6pm.

Yeah.  Bonehead move.  There was no effects at the moment, but I while I was walking to my bus stop after work, I got super lightheaded.  Why? Maybe too much of a surplus in caffeine.

I tried sleeping around 9:30, and everytime I closed my eyes and went into a stage of sleep before I actually fell asleep, everything felt like it was moving and I would get a jolt of warm energy from my elbows to my hands.  This ensued to 11pm, 1am, 3am….I had enough.  I was down near on a 24-hour stint and I headed to the clinic to get some medication to fall asleep.  Disclaimer: do this only during worse case scenarios…never on a regular basis because these drugs are terrible and they can affect your kidney.

I went to sleep around 4:30 am, woke up once to call in sick, and slept again until 11:30 am.  I felt so groggy and completely fatigue, but it was because of the excess caffeine.

Judgement Day

So, I was scared when I woke up.  I looked at my pre-workout and it looked at me.  I said, “should I, “and ‘it’ said, “should.”  I took only a half-a-scoop and off I went to the gym.  Now, there were no tingling effects or anything, but what I felt was an extreme amount of focus.  In this class had 4 other women and a guy.  The women I like to call “fair-weather” because some days they say good morning, other days they completely ignore you.  Didn’t matter, but it was motivation on top of the focus.

When the workout started, I was zoned it COMPLETELY.  This reminded me of the day I took Jack 3D back in 2012 and my energy was bouncing off the walls.  I didn’t give up once.  I kept it rolling for a full hour, which is unheard of.  Even during breaks, I kneeled and remained focus….normally I would chat it up or try throwing some conversation gambits out there for bait (lol).

Now, is this as good as Stimul, my absolute favorite pre-workout? Well, Stimul never gave me insomnia.  All will tell later on tonight if I can sleep or not.

Nonetheless, the ingredients, reviews and everything I saw online made me purchase this two days ago, and it surely didn’t disappoint.

  • Strength – Check
  • Quality – Check
  • Consistency – Check

 

Interviewee #17 – AJ’s Fitness Journey & Entrepreneurship

First time I met this man, I was in awe.  The size of him was unlike anything I had ever seen in my life.  If I can compare him to Evander Holyfield, one of America’s famous boxers, he’s a bit close.  Nonetheless, after chatting it up with him and hearing/seeing his charisma + his story, I decided to bring him on the show.

AJ is an NSCA Certified Personal Trainer and Strength and Conditioning coach.

​AJ’s athletic background and his ongoing curiosity to the latest nutrition and exercise research fuels his passion to assist and educate individuals in fulfilling any fitness and wellness goals. AJ strongly believes in taking a multi-dimensional approach towards optimal health and works with his clients to find ways to incorporate it in their lifestyles.

Get in touch with AJ of Bangkok, Thailand

– About fitness training, personal training and coaching.

Links:

 

Things we discussed:

  • Introduction about himself.
  • How long has AJ been in Bangkok.
  • How he started his work for the Lab and how long he’s been working for the Lab?
  • Discussing about the beginning of his fitness journey.
  • How he ended up in ESPN as a boxer.
  • How he ended up in the national championship.
  • Decision to become a personal trainer in boxing.
  • When the last time he fought in a boxing match.
  • How he ended up in other fields like engineering, teaching Mathematics, being  an online teacher, and digital nomading by travelling to Europe, India and Asia?
  • Your advice on about being a digital nomad or location – independent entrepreneurs.
  • Advise to people about being digital nomads or location – independent.
  • You need to be dedication in your work or side hustling by investing yourself.
  • Find something that is helping you and others. Think big and dare to dream.
  • Why the interviewee ended up in Thailand.
  • Applying teaching jobs from Thailand, South Korea and China.
  • When did you decide to become a fitness trainer?
  • How he branded himself as a fitness trainer?
  • Why the most fit is considered unhealthy?
  • How do you approach your fitness and your health?
  • Talking about mindfulness and personal development.
  • Talking about diets.
  • Be attentive to what and how you are doing with your body and your fitness.
  • Make the wholesome food as your priority in your health and diet.
  • You need to have quality diets between farm raised meat and plant based.
  • Your opinions on about keto-diet from a personal trainer.
  • Do your research about certain diets and lifestyles before you make a decision on which to follow.
  • Marketing about AJ’s personal branding.
  • Balance all in mindfulness, relationships, health and personal development, that’s what it’s all about being healthy.
  • What is the interviewee’s inspiration?
  • What is the interviewee’s outlook from 2 years from now?
  • What is the most difficult workout?
  • What is the number one condition for fat burning?

 

Thank you for listening!

 

Thank you so much for joining me for this podcast. Please do write down some feedbacks and comments. Please do share this podcast to your social media.

 

Links:

Why You Need To Eat Slowly – Barbell Nations’ Hakeem Khan

I was sitting across from this awesome individual who I had the special privilege of doing a podcast with in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia while sucking down some Nandos, and he told me about eating slowly can help reduce binging.  While this could’ve been true, I was very apprehensive until I saw the stats.  I couldn’t BELIEVE that this was actually true.  Here’s a breakdown from his blog, which I provided in the link down below.

Most of the research on this topic suggests that eating slowly helps you to eat less. That’s especially useful information if you’re trying to lose or maintain weight.

  • When eating quickly the women consumed 646 calories in 9 minutes.
  • When eating slowly the women consumed 579 calories in 29 minutes.

That is 67 less calories in 20 more minutes!

Now you will say that 67 calories is not that much? Imagine if you eat 4 meals a day. That is 268 calories!

What you want to do now?

You want to practice eating slowly and mindfully. Start small, in a day choose one meal, and spend 20 minutes to finish that meal. Practice this until it become your habit.

  • Sit down to eat in a calm environment with minimal distractions. Don’t eat while driving, while watching TV, while texting, etc. Pay attention to your food.
  • Choose high-fiber foods that take more time to chew, such as fresh fruits and vegetables.
  • Put down your utensils between bites. Take a moment. Breathe. If you’re eating with other people, enjoy making witty conversation for a few minutes.
  • Try setting a minimum number of chews per bite. This will feel strange at first, but give it a try and see what you discover.
  • Use smaller plates or different utensils (such as chopsticks).
  • If you find yourself rushing, that’s OK. Put your utensils down and take a minute to re-focus. If slow eating isn’t habitual for you, this will take practice.
  • Find another slow eater and pace yourselves to them. Picky little kids and chatty dinner companions who hardly stop talking long enough to take a bite are often ideal for this.
  • Set aside time to eat – at least 20-30 minutes for each meal, and preferably even longer at dinner. Don’t just eat “whenever you get around to it” or treat it as an inconvenience. You’re fueling your body and maybe spending quality time with friends and family. That’s important. It deserves an appointment.

Hakeem Khan’s Links

1) YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVZnrSCZIVEWFnhTUCHenQA

2) Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hakeeemkhan/?hl=en

3) Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/barbellnationmy/

4) Website: http://barbellnation.com.my/

Article: http://barbellnation.com.my/why-you-need-to-eat-slowly/

 

 

One Day Away – Spartan Race

Cardio, strength, core training, leg training….all of these things were done in bulk and now it’s time to put it to the test.

How do I feel going into the Spartan Super in Chon Buri, Thailand? I wouldn’t say nervous, but not really sure what to expect.  Have I trained like crazy since my Spartan Spartan Sprint in KL? Nope.  Honestly, I have done maybe two hard training sessions since mid-April.  Either I’ve grossly underestimated this race and I’m in for a grueling 13km, or I took a chance and knew what I was going to be up against.

Spartans in Thailand are far different from Malaysia.  In Malaysia, if you’re going to do a Sprint, you need to train for a Super.  If you’re going to do a Super, you need to train for a Beast.  That’s how difficult it is because the organizers set up the race on hills, rivers, gorges and so many other things.  It’s ridiculously tough.  So between now and July 28th, I will SURELY sign up with a gym and hit it hard.

Tomorrow is going to be not a test of will, but a test with the people I’m running with.  I will warn them in advance that if in the event one person begins to walk, I told them that I would meet them at the finish line.  I did not pay 66$ to walk.  I can walk at home for free.

2) It’s 13km, but I have my energy gels and everything ready to go (oh, and just by writing this blog, I just reminded myself that I need to buy some armguards for the race. YES!).

3) Now that I think of it, I think I’m seriously underestimating this race and could be in huge trouble.

Podcast

My Spartan Bag: Energy Gels

Now that the Spartan Race is over, I want to evaluate and see just how great these Energy Gels are.  In 2015, I didn’t have any protein bars on me or energy gels.  On that specific race in Melbourne, Australia, I almost gave up.  Was it because I lacked energy? Or lacked Will-Power in general? It could’ve been both.  However, I continued doing races without these bad boys for a couple of more years until the the Spartan Super in Putrajaya, Malaysia.

In that race I had 2 energy gels.  For the majority of that race, I was running.  I continued running for the longest of times, even after the 10km mark.  By the time the end of the race came, I felt pretty damn good!

Fast-forwarding to present day, I took yet another energy gel and felt absolutely amazing after the race.  So, I decided to make a video on this and show you guys an easy and affordable way to sustain your energy and give you a boost during your competitions.

Evaluating My Spartan Score

So I was practically top 25%, and almost 20%, in all categories.  If I look at the time, it’s not that good.  I don’t know exactly what happened during the race, but the obviously made it to be very difficult for attaining a good time.  I think I completed my Spartan Sprint last year in Thailand in a much better time than this, and I kinda walked the entire time!

So, how can I go about getting better? This is the best because I know where I am and where I want to be.

If you ask me, “where do you wanna be?”

Top 5%.  That’s always been a goal.  However, the terrain and everything could be so difficult to hit that mark.

I’ve gotten much stronger.  Again, I was passing so many people buy and didn’t have any stress on my body.  I’ve woken up this morning and it doesn’t even feel like I did the race yesterday.  No soreness or anything.  However, it didn’t reflect the time.  Might I say that I had to wait about 30 minutes total throughout all the obstacles, especially the one where we had to go through a creek and into a river.

I’m on a Spartan group on an app and I told everyone some vital information.

Cardio! Cardio! Cardio! There needs to be a lot of focus on cardio because that’s all part of the race.  One of the racers said, “I didn’t think I needed cardio.”  He failed miserably.  Another one said he did cardio everyday but it didn’t prepare him for the amount of hills the race had.  This is the super scary part about doing races in places like Malaysia.  They use hills and terrain to JACK YOU UP — EFFECTIVELY.

Having a very strong core can get you through most upper-body exercises.  One girl had me bust out in laughing by saying, “man, I did all that just to climb two feet over and fall.”  I laughed, but with her, not at her.  I then showed my strength by using the circles on the black-plastered wall and went all the way across with ease.  How? Strong core and utilizing it rather than using my upper-body.  It does revolve around technique, but your core is the foundation of it ALL.

Upper body, of course, is essential.  I’ve done lots of building up all areas the top and it proved to be extremely vital.

So, now in preparation for my Super, which is double the distance of the sprint, I’m going to do a lot of core building, strength on top, and tons of cardio.

 

Spartan Race: Seminyih, Malaysia…ACHIEVED! But……

WHAT. A. RACE.

Where should I begin? Let’s me take you from the beginning so I can provide some flow.

I arrived maybe around 9:15 to the station KTM – Kajang station.  This was nearest to the super rural area the where the race was being held.  From there, Ubers was stacked all around me.  I pressed it and got an immediate message – my uber was right across the street.  HOW CONVENIENT! He was a funny guy, asking me why I don’t have a girlfriend in Thailand.

Told him the truth. You guys know that story. LOL

There was a logjam about 2km outside the race area, so I had him pull over and I walked it from there.  Enthusiasts, not as many as I thought there would be, were making their way to registration.  Loads of tents and little shops were stacked within the area, giving my hope that this venue would be 1000 times better than the last at Putrajaya Heights last July.  It exceeded my expectations — and THEN SOME.  The registration line was about 10 minutes compared to 1.5 hours last time.  Bag drop was convenient with a bunch of smiley faces and women asking me how the race was (of course after) and there was a lot of area and merchandise around.

I was probably the 3rd wave of the Open.  There were a ton of people behind me, all whom were enthusiastic.  Some were first timers and others were returning.  You had people from Brunei, Hong Kong, Singapore, China and other places all around.  When the race started, it was all running, mostly uphill (as Malaysia mostly does) and then were the rocks.  That’s right.  The first obstacle, aside from the walls and things we had to jump through, under, and over, was the nastiest of them all.  This is where the fun began because the comedians started coming out in force.  Being on an obstacle course enables you to speak freely amongst your fellow samaritans who are going through the same pain.

At this time, this is when I knew I had gotten much strong since last September.  Carrying the bucket of rocks up the hill didn’t present me with a problem.  In fact, I was zooming past everyone else who seemed gassed and out of breath — 2km in?! I was screaming motivational things while hearing the echo of “aroo” deep in the forests and even nearby.  Directly following that was the rope climb.  I finally climbed up that bad boy; however, I freaked out when I was coming down and I zoomed down the rope, gripping it with my fingers and feeling fire tear apart my thumb on my left hand and my ring finger on my right, leaving a blister on one hand and two layers of skin on the rope from…..me.  This was beyond painful for about 1km.  After that, the river, which was SUEPR FUN.  There were women saying, “I HAVE A PLAN TO CATCH!”  People were laughing and just having fun at that point.  Being in a shaded, sketchy, peculiar area between two sides of a mountain, trekking through currents puts the “omg” into what Spartan should be about.

From there on out, there weren’t any noticeable or stand-outish things that came about — just more laughs and weird obstacles.  I am now 3/3 in the javelin toss, hitting my target and cheering for myself.  There were some GORGEOUS women nearby saying, “goodjob!” Another one, who must’ve been from Eastern Europe and on the same team of the 10 that were standing around, asked me “tips?”  I didn’t know what she was saying, but when I realized it, I was flabbergasted and helped two of the ladies — unsuccessfully.  This definitely had to be the funnest Spartan or any race in general.  It tips the Tough Mudder in Melbourne, Australia 3 years ago and tops the Tough Mudder in Mesa, Arizona from last year.

Towards the end, there was a Malaysian guy who was running by himself…pushing himself.  I decided to run beside him; and both him and I met up with an Indian guy.  The three of us started running alongside some other foreigners and funny Ukrainians before getting to a difficult part of the course — the end!  This mashed a bunch of obstacles together: backstroking 75 meters, another river with a current, monkey bell swings, and a few others.  When I finished, I saw a gorgeous shirt and medal waiting for me.  That was definitely a 10km beast of a race.  That wasn’t 7km….and they had Super/Beast obstacles within it, too.  The Spartan Sprint last year in Chon Buri, Thailand was a cake walk compared to this.

So, showers, chats with so many people, figuring out my next step with the trifecta and everything in ensued.  Now came the most difficult challenge of my life.

Because this race was tucked away in a jungle plantation, I wasn’t too nervous about finding a taxi until after a race.  There were taxis, also known as extortionists (and way worse than Thai taxis), sitting outside the grounds.  However, they were all taken because they had customers inside.  I never thought about that because I knew taxis were a ripoff.  I saw one taxi driver, and later saw him at my hotel.  That story will follow.

No Ubers, no grabs, no nothing! I was left walking….about 5km, hoping either someone would help take me to a town or a taxi would come.  I would’ve paid anything at any given time to get the hell out of there.  Some people pulled over, but not for me.  Next thing I know I see a car, coming towards me, flash its lights and I said, “OMG! SAVED!”  My man Anson, who is down below in the photo, probably saved me from dying.  That’s no exaggeration, either.

image1

All in all, he sent me all the way to an LRT line.  After 15 minutes, this particular line wrapped around KL and I saw Berjaya Times Square, just across the street from where my hotel was.  Instead of continuing on, I got off, talked to the guy, and I was able to exit the station and walk to my hotel.

Oh, and guess who was there? That f***er that denied me a ride to begin with.  Get this.  From the KTM Kajang to the race grounds was about 23 ringits, which equates to about 7 USD.  Kinda expensive in Thailand.  However, this guy told me someone AT MY HOTEL went to the race, too! The bad part? The taxi charged him 400 ringits there and back, equivalent to more than 100$ USD!  Could you believe that?! That’s why I NEVER TAKE TAXIS in KL and haven’t in almost five years.  They’re cheats beyond belief.

I needed to tell all of you that in case you travel here.

And with that beings said, a couple more blogs are coming up about my time and future races, so stay tuned and a podcast is here for your appetite!

Traveling + Fitness Goals = Malaysia/Singapore Spartan Is On The Board!

There’s been some hard decision-making going on my end, but I’m finally kicking off my travels this year with a minor bang.

Like I told you in the beginning with my blog, outlining the possible scenarios of traveling….it’s now evident that I will do a small travel at this juncture of the year, basically due to the fact that work is fluctuating like crazy at the moment.

Since I got some excellent feedback with crazy jobs, big projects and not quitting my main job (fully), I decided to go through with it.

I stated that I would be completing the trifecta this year in Spartan: sprint, super and beast being the races I would need to compete in to obtain that unique medal.

So, if I can take a pre-workout with the sprint in Malaysia/Singapore come March/April, compete in the Super with a massive team in May, and top if off with the Beast in Australia come November = WIN!

Now that I’ll be on a visa that enables me to travel every 2-3 months, I have even more opportunities to visit the likes of Jakarta, Bali (against), and hopefully fulfill that fantasy of doing a Tedx in Morocco later on this year.

The Problem

Airlines going to and from both KL and Singapore are infamous.  Air Asia, being a low-budget airline, forces passengers to pay for extra luggage.  Not only that, this airport is no longer in the vicinity where I live.  I would have to trek to northern Bangkok, stay at a hotel in the weeeee hours of the morning, then check in at 5:30am.  That’s a pain in the ass.  Furthermore, I have to pay for luggage and fly to the dog-house (KLIA 2 – the airport that smells like URINE – LOL).

If I go to Singapore, I can fly with scoot, who’s known for cancelling flights (like Australia’s Tiger Asia).  I get free baggage, but I might not get there.  Plane tickets are around the same cost….but Singapore’s hotels are more expensive, and the day of the race requires me taking a train and a cable car to Sentosa Island, something I seriously don’t want to do after a race.

So with the ridiculous but manageable problems, I decided to make a podcast that was just about everywhere in terms of information and throwing my arms in the air.

Podcast

https://www.spreaker.com/user/thearseniobuckshow/traveling-fitness-goals-malaysia-singapo

 

The Mastermind Group & Why You Should Form One

If you want to talk from a business aspect, forming a mastermind group is essential in personal growth because two-four minds are better than one, right?

Masterminding your way to success is pivotal.  If you can meet every week, bi-weekly – encouraging each other, networking, motivating one another…you’ll be well on your way to what Napoleon Hill calls “infinite intelligence.”

Look at Andrew Carnegie, for instance.  He had a mastermind group.  Harvey Firestone, Thomas Edison, and Henry Ford would go on wintry excursions to their mansions in Fort Meyers, Florida.  They accelerated their growth in doing so, and this is one of the best kept secrets in humanity.

A mastermind group can be composed of people not only from your industry or profession, but from all walks of life.  Example, I’m a teacher of life, among so many other things, but I just recently renewed an old relationship with a brilliant individual who introduced me to marketing geniuses who are leading a global expansion team in Taiwan, Vietnam, China and the Philippines.  The four of us will meet on video 1-4 times a month.  That’s a mastermind meeting.

What this does is bring new thoughts, new people, and new resources together.  Bring people into the group who are “above” and “ahead” of you professionally or financially and introduce you to other people.  Sometimes when we’re stuck in our own narrow field, we kind of see life through a small lens.  Henry Ford was an assembly-line expert.  Thomas Edison was an inventor.  Harvey Firestone was a corporate management genius.  So their mastermind group brought together everything, including perspectives and different daily challenges each individual faced.

Another way of looking at this would be your circle of friends.  Yes, you are comprised of your five closest friends.  If you’re shy and timid, you know exactly why.  For instance, I’ll be heading to the snowboard alps in Flagstaff, Arizona later on this year with a Nurse and Dental Hygienist or are both comical beyond belief.  This could also be a mastermind group because I’m bringing together masters of their respective fields.

Having an accountability partner is also included in the podcast down below, so if you want to hear more about this, tune in!